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Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas was the wife of Jefferson Thomas, Confederate officer and Georgia planter. This collection contains diaries, partially unbound, for the years 1848-1849, 1851-1852, 1855-1859, 1861-1866, 1868-1871, and 1878-1889, with the first volume in a different hand from the rest. Typed copies of the diaries are also included. The entries describe in detail Mrs. Thomas' reading; studies at Macon Female College (now called Wesleyan College) in Macon, Ga.; conversion to methodism; clothing and dress styles; gossip and social life; shopping and prices; church services; courtship by and marriage to Jefferson Thomas; and plantation life in Burke and Columbia counties.

This collection contains diaries, partially unbound, for the years 1848-1849, 1851-1852, 1855-1859, 1861-1866, 1868-1871, and 1878-1889, with the first volume in a different hand from the rest. Typed version of the diaries are also included. The entries describe in detail Mrs. Thomas' reading; studies at Macon Female College (now called Wesleyan College) in Macon, Ga.; conversion to methodism; clothing and dress styles; gossip and social life; shopping and prices; church services; courtship by and marriage to Jefferson Thomas; and plantation life in Burke and Columbia counties.

Other subjects discussed include black religion; the institution of slavery and the relations between white men and slave women; Civil War military activities, especially concerning Jefferson Thomas' career; destruction of property by Union troops; social conditions after the war; spiritualism; labor and servant problems, financial losses and poverty; school teaching; and the earthquake of 1886.

Other items include letters (two from Jefferson Thomas); photograph of a portrait of Mrs. Thomas; and a life membership certificate from the National Woman Suffrage Association of the United States (later the National American Woman Suffrage Association).

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Susan B. Anthony collection, 1870-1900 0.1 Linear Feet — 13 items

Collection comprises seven letters from Susan B. Anthony to various correspondents, one postcard written to her, a printed item, and a letter by S. J. S. Holden that mentions Anthony, Stanton, and the 1874 National Woman Suffrage Association (N.W.S.A.) convention.

Collection comprises seven letters from Susan B. Anthony to various correspondents, one postcard written to her, a printed item, and a letter by S. J. S. Holden that mentions Anthony, Stanton, and the 1874 National Woman Suffrage Association (N.W.S.A.) convention. In June 1870, Anthony wrote two letters to Edwin A. Studwell, who became her business manager, regarding payment for lectures in which she participated with Elizabeth Cady Stanton; her need to sell her serial, The Revolution, and plans for its continued success; competition with suffragists in Boston; her life insurance policies; and her general need for ready funds. There is also a Dec. 1873 letter from Anthony to Judge Henry R. Selden requesting copy for his argument made on Anthony's behalf regarding the Rights of Women in the U.S. District Court of New York, to be published in time for the upcoming N.W.S.A. convention. The postscript to this letter was written upon a flyer for a mass meeting of the New York Woman's Suffrage Society. Collection includes a copy of the final, printed version of Selden's argument, "Rights of women under the late constitutional amendments."

In 1894, Anthony wrote two letters to a suffragist concerning problems in Kansas; she wished to identify the Republican, Progressive, or other person responsible for "stirring things up," for the Republicans failed to include suffrage in their platform. On 1900 April 24, Anthony wrote to Rachel [Foster Avery?] regarding several publications in process, including forms for letters to the national conventions of the prohibition, Populist, Democratic, and Republican parties; a "memorial;" an appeal to the Ecumenical Council; along with other work to be shared by the suffrage leadership. A letter from Anthony 1900 July 22 was written to an unnamed suffragist who likely requested an autograph, "Yes indeed--you shall have my pen tracks--not only--but also my wish that you both believe in work for the protection of women in the crowning right of citizenship--the right to vote--and so help to hasten the day when ours shall be a true republic in practice as it now is in theory."

Collection also includes a postcard written to Anthony from Mary L. Lathrop in Jackson, [Miss.?] in 1874 regarding Lathrop's inability to send more money following Anthony's successful speaking engagement there; the money went toward advertising for the event. Another letter, from S. J. S. Holden to Rachel [Foster Avery?], in 1874 describes attendance at the N.W.S.A. convention, the speeches of Anthony and Elizabeth Cay Stanton, and other pastimes in Washington, D.C. Several of the letters in the collection are written on N.W.S.A. or National-American Woman Suffrage Association letterhead; Anthony's 1894 letters are stamped with the ownership mark of the Daughters of the Pioneers of Washington library. Collection includes dealer transcriptions for two of Anthony's letters.