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Axel Leijonhufvud papers, 1953-1980 and undated 4.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 3,000 Items

Swedish economist, currently professor emeritus at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and professor at the University of Trento, Italy. The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud date from 1953-1980 and consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory, especially as it pertains to finance; instability and disequilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general. A few items are in Swedish.

The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory; instability and (dis)equilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general.

The Correspondence Series includes communications from notable individuals such as Armen Alchian, Robert W. Clower (co-author), Robert Dorfman, Alan G. Gowman, Bert Hoselitz, Erik Lundberg, Gunnar Myrdal, and Joan Robinson. A few items are in Swedish. The Writings and Research Series includes Leijonhufvud's master's thesis and notes, doctoral dissertation and related research, and a variety of graduate papers in addition to drafts and published pieces; there are six subseries - Axel Leijonhufvud Writings, Class Lecture Notes, Dissertation, Graduate Work, Research and Notes, and Writings by Others. Within the latter there is a sizeable amount of unpublished and later-published manuscripts by Joan Robinson, fellow economist and close colleague.

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Edward H. Chamberlin (1899-1967) was an economist and professor at Harvard University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, and items of a personal nature.

The Edward H. Chamberlin papers document his career as an economist and professor. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on topics such as monopolistic competition, market structure, pricing behavior, economies of scale, and collective bargaining, among others. The collection also documents his correspondence with prominent economists and individuals such as Marice Allais, Luigi Einaudi, Dwight Eisenhower, Howard S. Ellis, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Gottfried Haberler, Frank Hahn, Roy Harrod, Friedrich A. Hayek, Richard Kahn, Nicholas Kaldor, Frank Knight, Emil Lederer, Wassily Leontief, Abba Lerner, Gertrud Lovasy, Fritz Machlup, Hans Neisser, J. F. Normano, Francois Perroux, Dennis H. Robertson, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, Thomas Schelling, Robert Schuman, Joseph Schumpeter, Ben Seligman, George Stigler, Frank Taussig, Gerhard Tintner, Jaroslav Vanek, Jacob Viner, and many others.

Along with his scholarship and writings, the collection documents Chamberlin's roles in the American Economic Association, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Council of Economic Advisers, and the Rockefeller Foundation project to aid refugee scholars fleeing Europe during the 1930s; his editorship of the Quarterly Journal of Economics; his speaking engagements; expert testimony in legal proceedings and before houses of the United States Congress; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Harvard. The collection also contains personal artifacts documenting Chamberlin's service in the National Guard during World War 1, his service as a member of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War 2, as well as awards and honorary degrees.

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The papers of Evsey Domar span the years 1939 through 1995, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1957 and 1989. The collection consists chiefly of professional correspondence between Domar and his colleagues, with smaller groups of materials consisting of writings; research materials; printed materials; speeches and lectures; and course materials relating to Domar's teaching career. Although Domar was interested in a wide range of subjects in the fields of economics and political science, the papers in this collection chiefly address his work on serfdom and slavery, particularly in Russia; the economics of socialist systems of government; the economics of agriculture; and theories of productivity and efficiency. Other minor topics include macroeconomics; the economies of Yugoslavia and Lithuania; value-added tax systems; economic development, and growth in general, and the American economy.

The Correspondence Series consists of professional correspondence concerning recommendations, papers, publishing, trip planning and reports, invitation responses, and other academic affairs. Frequently Domar exchanged comments on papers and other writings with fellow colleagues and former students. Important correspondents include Don Patinkin, Mark Perlman, Allan Brown, Alexander Gerschenkron, Lauchlin Currie, Alvin Hansen, Joan Robinson, and many others.

The Research Materials Series contains papers documenting Domar's research on serfdom and slavery (particularly in Russia); productivity and efficiency; value-added taxes; and other topics. Several papers discuss the economies of Yugoslavia and Lithuania. Includes many graphs and tables relating to Domar's published and unpublished work. There are very few papers by other individuals.

The Printed Materials Series is made up of mostly hardcover books from Domar's personal library. Most are editions or translations of his own published works, but there are several works by other authors. Includes microfilm of 1904 Russian work on unknown subject matter, and 1980 translation of 1861 Russian work on serfdom in Russia.

The Course Materials Series contains lecture notes and other materials related to Domar's extensive teaching career in economics. Two notebooks from 1939 and 1940 reveal aspects of his student years

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Paul Davidson papers, 1961-2004 and undated 13.5 Linear Feet — Apprpoximately 10,125 Items

Economist on the faculty at the University of Tennessee and editor of the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics. The Paul Davidson Papers span the years 1961-2004 and document his professional career and interests, including post-Keynesian economics; international monetary payments and global employment policies; monetary theory; income distribution; and energy economics. The collection almost exclusively consists of correspondence files, with the exception of a few clippings and speeches folders. The most notable group of correspondents are his fellow post-Keynesians such as Victoria Chick, Alfred Eichner, John Kenneth Galbraith, Geoff Harcourt, Jan Kregel, Hyman Minsky, Basil Moore, Luigi Pasinetti, Joan Robinson, Anthony Thirlwall, and Sidney Weintraub. Other correspondents of note include Philip Arestis, Peter Bernstein, Robert Clower, Robert Eisner, Sir John Hicks, Allan H. Meltzer, Edward Nell, Don Patinkin, James Tobin, and Paul Samuelson. Other large amounts of correspondence and other materials relate to Davidson's editorial work with many major economics journals, including the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, which he founded; these folders typically contain correspondence between Davidson, journal referees, and authors.

The Paul Davidson Papers span the years 1961-2004 and document his professional career and interests, including post-Keynesian economics; international monetary payments and global employment policies; monetary theory; income distribution; and energy economics. The collection almost exclusively consists of correspondence files, with the exception of a few clippings and speeches folders. The most notable group of correspondents are his fellow post-Keynesians such as Victoria Chick, Alfred Eichner, John Kenneth Galbraith, Geoff Harcourt, Jan Kregel, Hyman Minsky, Basil Moore, Luigi Pasinetti, Joan Robinson, Anthony Thirlwall, and Sidney Weintraub. Other correspondents of note include Philip Arestis, Peter Bernstein, Robert Clower, Robert Eisner, Sir John Hicks, Allan H. Meltzer, Edward Nell, Don Patinkin, James Tobin, and Paul Samuelson. Other large amounts of correspondence and other materials relate to Davidson's editorial work with many major economics journals, including the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, which he founded; these folders typically contain correspondence between Davidson, journal referees, and authors. In one group of folders, Davidson engages with other colleagues in sometimes heated exchanges about bias in professional journals. In addition to correspondence with colleagues and authors, the files also contain correspondence related to academic departments where Davidson held positions. Reflecting his broad background, the papers also document Davidson's involvement with politics (see the Congress folder) and consultancy work for an energy company in his early career (the Oil and Energy folders), and his role as an active public figure, documented by letters to the editor for various maistream publications.