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Seven mounted photographs and five pamphlets from the Abortion Rights Association of New York, later known as the Abortion Rights Association, Inc., dating between 1972 and 1974. Pamphlets explain abortion procedures, clinic and physician guidelines, and women's rights to abortion, largely designed to address and implement the Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade. Photographs (which contain captions) include black-and-white images of tools used in self-induced abortions; coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-induced abortions; morgue photographs of infanticide victims; and images of fetuses in utero.

Collection consists of a set of seven mounted photographs, apparently intended for exhibition, and a set of five pro-choice pamphlets created by the Abortion Rights Association of New York (later known as Abortion Rights Association, Inc.). The photographs include coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-inflicted abortions; morgue photographs of infanticides; equipment and tools used in self-inflicted abortions; and fetuses in utero, one with deformed brain. Author of the included captions is unknown. The pamphlets, written to assist New York physicians and practioners implementing the Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, address women's rights to clinical abortions, abortion laws, counseling and guidance on policies, and references to New York abortion clinics and practitioners.

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The Irish historian Alice Stopford Green writes to an unidentified editor or publisher to decline an invitation to write an article on Irish Americans for an upcoming publication.

Green writes to an unidentified male editor or publisher ("Dear Sir"), to decline his invitation to write an article for a forthcoming book. She writes that she is "overwhelmed by work this winter," and that "the subject of the American Irish is almost unknown to me and it would need a considerable time and reading to write anything worthy of your insertion." In conclusion, she writes that she is "keeping in view the idea of getting some work done which may draw attention to your publications." Written on letterhead: 36 Grosvenor Road, Westminster.

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Single, typescript letter dated 1900 January 4. The journalist, editor, collector, and Brontë expert Clement Shorter writes to thank Mrs. F.L.E. Bellfield for a book which he found helpful for his research. Shorter was in the process of editing a new edition of Elizabeth Gaskell's Life of Charlotte Brontë, originally published in 1899. Also mentioned is a forthcoming new edition of The Life of Charlotte Brontë and her sisters, edited by Mrs. Ward Humphry.

The collection consists of a single page typescript letter dated 1900 January 4 on The Sphere newspaper's letterhead. Clement Shorter writes to Mrs. F.L.E. Bellfield to thank her for giving him a book which he found helpful in his preparation for a new edition of Elizabeth Gaskell's Life of Charlotte Brontë that he was in the process of editing. The letter also mentions a forthcoming new edition published by Smith & Elder of The Life and Works of Charlotte Brontë, edited by Mrs. Ward Humphry and with an introduction by Shorter.

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Emmeline and Frederick Pethick-Lawrence were British socialist activists best known for their involvement with the suffragist movement. This collection consists of four typescript notes and two greeting cards.

The collection consists of four typescript notes and two greeting cards. The first card is headed "Votes for Women, The National Women's Social and Political Union, Greetings and Good Wishes for 1908," addressed to Mr. and Mrs. Grinling from Mr. and Mrs. Pethick-Lawrence. The second card, dated 1936-1937, has a tipped-in photograph of the Pethick-Lawrences, signed "with love from Fred and Emmeline." A typescript letter, on The National Women's Social and Political Union stationery, dated July 8, 1908, is signed by Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Mrs. Grinling, and asks to have her husband convey a resolution passed at a Woolich suffrage meeting to Prime Minister Asquith. Included is a typescript copy of the letter from Grinling to Asquith carrying out the request. A typescript note, dated September 22, 1922, signed Mrs. Pethick-Lawrence on her letterhead, declines subscribing to something sent to her by Mr. Grinling. A typescript note from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to C.H. Grinling, dated October 3, 1945, mentions a copy of a birthday telegram Grinling sent to Gandhi, who she describes as "one of the great moral and religious leaders of the present age ... his reputation and his influence will continue to grow for many years to come." A typescript note signed "Fred," dated July 9, 1945 on "The Rt. Hon. Lord Pethick-Lawrence of Peaslake" letterhead thanks C.H. Grinling for a letter of welcome.

The library also holds a number of individually cataloged printed materials owned by the Pethick-Lawrences.

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European tourist travel negatives, between 1910-1915 36 items — 1 box — 34 nitrate negatives; 2 original processing envelopes — 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches

This early 20th century collection of 34 nitrate sheet negatives features black-and-white travel images taken mainly in European cities. Subjects chiefly focus on popular tourist landmarks such as gardens, parks, bridges, buildings, and statuary. The travelers seem to be all women and at least one young child. Locations identified by library staff include Paris and Bruges, but other locations are unidentified, as are the photographer and subjects. It is assumed that some locations are in London or England, as one of two commercial photograph processing envelopes from the London firm Selfridge's accompanying the negatives is marked "English trip 1913." The negatives are sized 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches.

This early 20th century collection of 34 nitrate sheet negatives features black-and-white tourist travel images mainly taken in European cities sometime between 1910-1915. Subjects chiefly focus on landmarks such as gardens, parks, bridges, buildings, and statuary. The travelers seem to include women and at least one young child. Identified cities include Paris and Bruges, but other locations are uncertain, as are the identities of the photographer and subjects. Two commercial photographic processing envelopes are from the London firm Selfridge's; one is marked "English trip, 1913." The negatives are sized 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches.

The dating is taken in part from the 1913 date on the processing envelope and from a billboard advertising a musical being staged in Paris.

Forms part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection, acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Autograph manuscript letter with postmarked envelope from the actress and writer Fanny Kemble in London to Miss Patteson in Andover, 10 May, 1889. Kemble thanks Miss Patteson for sending photographs, mentioning that she particularly values one of Bishop Patteson. She says she is "glad Lord Coleridge thought Lenox (Mass.) pretty. It has always seemed to me a charming mountain village." Frances Anne "Fanny" Kemble was a British actress, writer, and abolitionist. She was born into a theater family; her acting career spanned the years 1829-1868. Kemble acted to support herself, but she was most passionate about writing, and was an accomplished playwright, poet, and diarist. She married the Pierce Mease Butler, an American who subsequently inherited his family' plantations. After spending time in Georgia, Kemble became an abolitionist and later divorced her husband. In 1863, Kemble published her anti-slavery memoir, Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839, which is said to have influenced the British against supporting the Confederacy in the Civil War. Kemble's own family was divided on that issue, as her elder daughter sided with her mother, while her younger daughter returned to Georgia with her father. Frances Butler Leigh published Ten Years on a Georgia Plantation Since the War (1883) as a rebuttal to her mother's memoir. Kemble's success as a Shakespearean actress enabled her to buy a cottage in Lenox, Massachusetts. Her correspondent, Miss Patteson, is the daughter of Frances Duke Patteson, a niece of the poet Samuel Coleridge Taylor; the Lord Coleridge mentioned in the letter is John Duke Coleridge (1820-1894), the 2nd Lord Chief Justice of England. Bishop Patteson refers to Miss Patteson's sister, John Patteson (1827-1871), who became an Anglican martyr after being killed doing mission work in the Solomon Islands.

Autograph manuscript letter with postmarked envelope from the actress and writer Fanny Kemble in London to Miss Patteson in Andover, 10 May, 1889. Kemble thanks Miss Patterson for sending photographs, mentioning that she particularly values one of Bishop Patteson. She says she is "glad Lord Coleridge thought Lenox (Mass.) pretty. It has always seemed to me a charming mountain village."

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In the late 18th century, Eleanor Butler (1739-1829) and Sarah Ponsonby (1755-1832), also known as the Ladies of Llangollen, left their lives in the upper tiers of Anglo-Irish society and made a home for themselves in Llangollen, Wales, to the disapproval of both their families. Butler and Ponsonby appeared to have understood their relationship as a marriage, and they were known for dressing alike in masculine clothing. They were part of an emerging culture of 'romantic friendship' between same-sex couples. While they lived a life of rural retreat, the Ladies' relative celebrity and social status meant that their home Plas Newydd became a salon. They hosted the many of the intelligensia of the day, including poets such as Wordsworth and Byron, and the reigning Queen Charlotte. The collection is largely made up of letters by the Ladies, as well as materials about Llangollen, the cultural haven of Plas Newydd, and images of the Ladies in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

The Ladies of Llangollen Collection is made up of materials both by and about Lady Eleanor Butler and Miss Sarah Ponsonby's life at their home, Plas Newydd, in Llangollen, Wales.

The largest part of the collection is the letters written by and to the Ladies. Most of the correspondence takes place between Sarah Ponsonby and her cousin Mrs. Sarah Tighe, along with letters from Eleanor Butler, their neighbor Ch. L. West, and the Fownes family, Sarah Ponsonby's cousins and former guardians. The manuscripts include poems by the Ladies, as well as an account written about the Ladies of Llangollen by Ch. L. West and an album by a visitor to Llangollen. The papers contain items and images of the Ladies of Llangollen, Llangollen Vale, and the traditions of Wales in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Guidebooks, maps, and printed materials make up the materials about the history of the Ladies' beloved Llangollen. The images of the Ladies and their home in Llangollen Vale make up the largest part of the image files.

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Lucretia Mott papers, 1848-1887 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 11 items

Lucretia Mott was a Quaker teacher of Philadelphia, Pa.; a Hicksite; an abolitionist; and a promoter of women's rights, temperance, and peace. Collection includes a quote accompanied by Mott's autograph, along with three letters, including one regarding arranging a meeting, one regarding the death of Margaret Pryor, and one written by Mott to Thomas M'Clintock regarding the death of her brother and with news of other mutual acquaintances. There are also five items from an 1879 autograph book, including albumen photographs of Mott and an unidentified man, a copy of the same quote and signature of Mott, an address for a letter, and a newspaper obituary for John G. Saxe. Includes a 5.5"x7.75" albumen studio portrait of Mott that has some hand-tinting, taken by F. Gutekunst in Philadelphia in 1861, along with an undated carte de visite of Mott, also taken by Gutekunst.

Collection includes a quote accompanied by Mott's autograph, along with three letters, including one regarding arranging a meeting, one regarding the death of Margaret Pryor, and one written by Mott to Thomas M'Clintock regarding the death of her brother and with news of other mutual acquaintances. There are also five items from an 1879 autograph book, including albumen photographs of Mott and an unidentified man, a copy of the same quote and signature of Mott, an address for a letter, and a newspaper obituary for John G. Saxe. Includes a 5.5"x7.75" albumen studio portrait of Mott that has some hand-tinting, taken by F. Gutekunst in Philadelphia in 1861, along with an undated carte de visite of Mott, also taken by Gutekunst.

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Nestia V. Lloyd diaries, 1923-1925 0.2 Linear Feet — 3 volumes

Three annual diaries (1923-1925) kept by Nestia V. Lloyd, a young woman (b. 1902) living with her parents in London and Wales.

Collection consists of three bound diaries kept by Nestia V. Lloyd for the years 1923, 1924, and 1925. The early pages of the diaries include printed matter such as calendars, tips intended for women in the home (regarding cooking, cleaning, personal hygiene and health, fashion), London theaters (including Lloyd's notes about which shows she saw at which theaters), and notes. Lloyd used the diaries regularly and discussed her personal activities, gifts sent and received for various occasions, financial expenses and housekeeping, her work and schooling, her travels and activities through London and Wales, and family news.

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"Woman: the World Over": a lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern, 1901 49 items — 1 box; 1 pamphlet binder — 48 glass lantern slides; one printed booklet — Slides measure 3 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches — 48 glass slides; 1 printed booklet.

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Collection consists of a commercially produced set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides entitled "Woman: The World Over," published in 1901 by Riley Brothers in Bradford, England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set lists 53 slides in all, and contains detailed lecture-format captions. The women in the portraits represent nations around the world. Subjects include women of different classes; married women and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, with children, and in roles which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. Other slides show women working in agricultural, service, and industrial settings, and gambling and climbing mountains. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. Lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, and changing social norms as the 20th century begins. One slide is black-and-white. All titles are original, as is the slide sequence. Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection consists of a nearly complete lecture set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides published in England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set bears the full title, "Woman: the world over. A lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern." The price appearing on the booklet is sixpence.

The booklet lists 53 slides in this set, and contains detailed lecture-format captions which would be read aloud as the slides were projected. The series is incomplete: numbers 28, 47, 48, 51, 53, and 54 are not present. Titles are also printed along the mount edges of each slide but are obscured in a few cases by black repair tape. All titles are original, as is the slide order. The titles and lecture script contain historical terms and language that may be offensive to modern-day audiences. The slides measure 3 1/4 inches square (83 x 83 mm).

The slides and lecture notes were originally arranged in six series, retained in this description: Woman in Society; The Domestic Woman; Woman in Subjection; Emancipated Woman; Woman the Breadwinner; and Angelic Woman.

The women in the portraits represent races, cultures and nations around the world, among which British Guiana, China, Iceland, India, Japan, Netherlands, the Philippines, Russia, Switzerland, Tonga, Tunisia, and the U.S. There are portraits of women with high social status, married women, and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, women with children, and in roles of subjugation which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. A few images include men.

The series "Woman the Breadwinner" includes agricultural, craft, and industrial scenes, and a slide of women nurses attending to patients. The "Emancipated Woman" series includes an actress, a group of nurses, and women mountaineering. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters for the Women's Christian Temperance Union from 1892 to 1926. Titles are present on the edges of most of the glass slide mounts, and are listed in full in the booklet.

The booklet's lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, as well as changing social norms as the 20th century begins. The series ends with romantic images of ideal women, chiefly through the lens of courtship and beauty. Most of the missing slides are from this group.

The set held by the Rubenstein is numbered 1239 in the lecture booklet. There is no date on either the slides or the booklet, but the Women's Temple in Chigago, completed in 1892, provides the earliest date. A slide entitled "Wife of the Khedive" helps provide the latest date: the Egyptian title "Khedive" was last used in 1914. The Lucerna Magic Lantern Web Resource (viewed online November 8 2017) gives the publisher as the Riley Brothers of Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and the publication date as 1901.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.