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Collection
Abigail Buttons was the daughter of Desire Clark. Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever.

Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever and asks for "... prayers for me that God would inable me to behave my self in Christian manner in whatsoever he calls me to meet with." She requests a visit from her mother and her brother, John.

Collection
Ada Lovelace was a mathematician in 19th century England and the only legitimate child of the poet George Gordon, Lord Byron. She is often recognized as the creator of the first set of instructions meant to be carried out by a machine, and is thus seen as a pioneer of what would later become computer programming. The Ada Lovelace letter is a one-page note to [Fortunato] Prandi, an Italian interpreter, regarding ten guineas Lovelace owed Prandi.

Consists of a single hand-written letter to [Fortunato] Prandi, dated Thursday 5th August. Date could be 1841 or 1847. One page, folded, written on front and back.

The letter is apparently in reply to a request for ten guineas owed by Lovelace to Prandi. She discusses putting off sending him the sum because of travel and also "disagreeable business." She goes on to say she is well in spite of being a "disconsolate widow" and will soon "leave town", "probably to Brighton". The letter closes with an apology for the lateness of repayment and includes a postscript noting her amusement at the "modesty" of his request. It is signed A. A. Lovelace.

Collection

Agnes Smedley letters, 1930s-1947 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Agnes Smedley was a journalist, writer, and left-wing activist remembered for her activity on behalf of the Communist cause in China during the 1930s. It is believed that she engaged in extensive espionage activities while she lived in Shanghai from 1929-1941. The Agnes Smedley letters consist of three letters by Smedley, the first of which was written while she lived in Shanghai, and the second two while she lived at the Yaddo artists' colony during the 1940s. The first letter is a request for a social engagement, and the second two letters discuss the particulars of her political observations and writings while she lived and worked in China.

The collection consists of three letters written by Agnes Smedley; the first to a Miss Gates, and the second two addressed to Corporal James A. Frankel. The single-page autograph manuscript letter to Miss Gates is written on letterhead stationery with Smedley's Shanghai address identifying her as the "Correspondent of the Frankfurter Zeitung in China." She asks Miss Gates to have "tiffin or tea" with her and wonders "Do you ever have extra time to see strange people?" The second manuscript letter, two leaves with text on all four sides, is dated December 27th, 1944. It primarily concerns Emily Hahn's book "China To Me." Smedley writes, “Miss Hahn spent 9 years sleeping around in Shanghai ... When the Japs took Hong Kong she wrote that she would just have died had she gone to a concentration camp like other Americans. So she went to the Japs and said, 'I’m a bad girl.' So the Japs left her free and she fooled around with them in Hong Kong, drinking and carousing, while the bastards were killing our men... But we Americans find this 'hot stuff' and put it up as a best seller... Miss Hahn is a propagandist for the Chinese reaction. She’s never seen a Chinese Communist, yet she’s agitating against them in N.Y... She led a purely personal life in two Chinese port cities but now poses as an authority on political and military matters of China." The third letter, autograph typescript dated March 23d 1947, was originally enclosed in Frankel’s copy of Smedley's book Battle Hymn of China, and addresses Frankel's questions about the Xi'an Incident of 1936 and the capture of Chiang Kai-shek. Smedley directs Frankel to her article on the topic published in The Nation magazine, as well as "her book."

Collection
The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures, including authors, poets, playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages.

The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including authors and poets, as well as twentieth-century playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. There are often letters and notes bearing autographs of the authors, some of them purchased by Taylor, or obtained with the assistance of Taylor's mother or her friend, Dorothy Kraus. Unfortunately, many of the autographed items have been removed. Pages often include handwritten or typed lists of works. There are several black-and-white photographs, along with photo postcards, and regular postcards. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages. Scrapbooks have been disbound for conservation purposes.

Collection
Collection comprises an pin with the text "American Women's Voluntary Services" on a background of red, white, and blue enamel. The back of the pin is marked "Bastian Brothers Co, Rochester, N.Y."
Collection

Anaïs Nin letter to Thomas C. DiGenti, 1962 February 21, 1962 Febuary 21 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item (2 leaves) + 1 envelope — 21 x 27 cm.

Letter from writer Anaïs Nin to American collector Thomas C. DiGenti regarding his wish to purcase a copy of Nin's literary magazine Two Cities. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Letter from writer Anaïs Nin to the American collector, Thomas DiGenti, who wants a copy of her literary magazine Two Cities. She does not have a copy, but directs him to the NYC bookshop The Phoenix, on Cornelia St. Nin has turned over distribution of Two Cities to The Phoenix at a financial loss due to constraints on her time. She writes of her desire to publish the work of new writers. She goes on to describe a recent trip to Europe where she visited London, Brussels, and Paris, where she was well-received due to her European popularity. Nin asks DiGenti if he has an extra copy of her book D.H. Lawrence: An unprofessional study. She wants to send it to her London publisher, who is interested in putting out a new edition. Nin states that she's currently busy writing Seduction of the Minotaur, the last part of her Cities of the Interior sequence which she describes as a "finale to the novels."

Collection
Anna Letitia Barbauld was an English woman of letters who had great professional success at a time when women writers were still something of an anomaly. She is remembered for her poetry, children's literature, essays, criticism, and editorial works. She was rediscovered when feminist literary critics examined her place in British literary history. Barbauld was also an abolitionist, something she had in common with fellow educator and Stoke Newington resident William Allen. This item is a single small sheet of paper with an autograph manuscript poem by Barbauld on the front dated August 23, 1823, and another one on the back by William Allen dated August 30, 1823. Both poems were aimed at a juvenile audience. It is likely that their common interests and close proximity led them to develop a friendship. Although this was written towards the end of Barbauld's life, it is evidence that they still had at least an epistolary relationship in 1823.

Collection consists of a single piece of paper (20 x 12.5 cm) with an autograph manuscript poem by Anna Letitia Barbauld on the front and a poem called "Follow Me" by William Allen on the back. Barbauld's poem reads as follows: Born to the weighty honours of a name/Whose deeds of mercy England's shores proclaim/Yet know, you may inherit lands or pelf/But must, for praise - for love, be good yourself. It's signed A.L. Barbauld and dated August 23rd 1823. The verso contains a two-stanza autograph manuscript devotional poem by William Allen titled "Follow Me." It is signed Stoke Newington 30 of 8th month 1823. Barbauld and Allen were both educators and abolitionists who lived in Stoke Newington at the time of this writing. These poems are evidence that they had at least an epistolary friendship.

Collection

Annie Besant letters, 1882-1883 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Annie Besant was a British socialist, theosophist, women's rights activist, writer and orator, and supporter of Irish and Indian self-rule. Collection comprises two autograph, signed letters written by Annie Besant. The first, written 1882 May 20, originally accompanied a copy of a petition, and asked the editor of the Evening News to publish the petition, since he published an attack upon "Dr. E. Aveling, the Misses Bradlaugh" and herself, "as teachers of the Science School of the Hall of Science." The second, written 1883 December 4 to an unidentified addressee, indicated "the place of the meeting is the Grosvenor Gallery."

Collection comprises two autograph, signed letters written by Annie Besant. The first, written 1882 May 20, originally accompanied a copy of a petition, and asked the editor of the Evening News to publish the petition, since he published an attack upon "Dr. E. Aveling, the Misses Bradlaugh" and herself, "as teachers of the Science School of the Hall of Science." The second, written 1883 December 4 to an unidentified addressee, indicated "the place of the meeting is the Grosvenor Gallery." Both items written on Besant's stationery, with her name and address printed in brown ink.

Collection

Carrie F. Young papers, 1872-1894 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 21 items

Carrie F. Young was one of the first advocates of women's suffrage in California, and was an activist for other political causes. Young eventually became a physician, the first woman to receive a medical diploma in California, from the Oakland College of Medicine in 1884. Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials.

Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials. There is a letter regarding political matters and a typescript page of general instructions for an unnamed convention, both written by Young's son, Robert E. Bush; a recommendation for Young's work on national campaigns as a Republican poltical activist and speaker, dated 1889; two advertisements for a Mrs. Dr. Tarbell's treatments of "nervous diseases and female complaints;" two pages of guidelines for a populist club; one of Young's calling cards; and an enclosure for the California Medical Journal. There is also a brochure for "photographic fern-leaf mottoes." In addition, there are 8 flyers, handbills, and broadsides, all advertising political speeches (especially for the People's Party), lectures, or medical work by Young, except for two that advertise speeches by Mrs. M. S. Singer of Chicago, and Dr. J. V. C. Smith. Collection also includes issues of the serials Life Crystals (March 1882, no. 3), edited by Young, and Pacific Journal of Health (January-September 1872, nos. 1-9), published by Young.

Collection
Charles Nordhoff (31 August 1830 - 14 July 1901) was an American journalist, descriptive and miscellaneous writer. Collection comprises a private autograph letter, signed, that Charles Nordhoff wrote to William C. Russel, acting president of Cornell University, in 1881.

Collection comprises a private autograph letter, signed, that Charles Nordhoff wrote to William C. Russel, acting president of Cornell University, in 1881. The topic of the letter is Russel's stand against Henry Ward Beecher; Nordhoff writes "to send you my congratulations & hearty good wishes, as the manly stand you have taken in [regard?] to Mr. Beecher. I am sorry that you should be made to suffer for doing what I believe was your most solemn & imperative duty as the guardian of [illegible] men & women...."

Collection

Christina Rossetti letter, 1881 December 17 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection consists of a single letter from the Pre-Raphealite poet Christina Rossetti to an unnamed recipient in the publishing industry. She grants him permission to use poems from three of her published collections in an upcoming "Fine Art Book for Christmas 1882." Rossetti states that there should be no variation of the text from the source material, and that she chose those three collections because she personally holds their copyright.

Collection consists of an autograph manuscript letter signed Christina G. Rossetti, granting the unnamed recipient, presumably a publisher, permission to reprint some of her poems. The letter is written on a single folded sheet of paper with text on two pages. She lists her address as: 30 Torrington Square - London - W.C. Rossetti refers to the correspondent's "assurance that no variation whatsoever" will appear in "your Fine Art book for Xmas 1882." Rossetti names three of her books he may use as source material: "Poems," "Pageant," and "Sing Song." She writes, "I name these, because not every piece to be found elsewhere is in every instance of my own copyright."

Collection
Lady Elizabeth Holford was born Elizabeth Lewis around 1650. She first married a merchant called Harbin, whose wealth she inherited. Her second husband was a poor baronet, Sir William Holford, who died before her. Lady Holford died on 3 November 1720, without an heir. Collection comprises a handwritten manuscript copy (70 pages; incomplete, the text ends mid-sentence) of Lady Holford's will and codicils, created around 1720, following her death. In the will, large sums of money are bequeathed to several Oxford colleges, including Christ Church, Pembroke and Worcester Colleges, and Hart Hall, along with Charterhouse School. There are also lesser legacies made to various London charity schools, along with other amounts left to individuals.

Collection comprises a handwritten manuscript copy (70 pages; incomplete, the text ends mid-sentence) of Lady Holford's will and codicils, created around 1720, following her death. In the will, large sums of money are bequeathed to several Oxford colleges, including Christ Church, Pembroke and Worcester Colleges, and Hart Hall, along with Charterhouse School. There are also lesser legacies made to various London charity schools, along with other amounts left to individuals.

Collection
Collection comprises a certificate written by Fairfax stating that he examined Alsy (Alice), who was a slave being hired out to Charles Mothershead in Westmoreland Co., Va. He found that she had procidentia uteri (her entire uterus was outside the vagina), which caused her to be unable to work. He added, "She may be made useful by the application of an instrument properly adjusted, to keep the part from coming down."
Collection

Edith Sitwell poems, circa 1940-1950 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Dame Edith Sitwell was a British poet and critic whose work helped usher in the modernist era of British poetry. This autograph manuscript contains the text of two of her poems: "Lullaby" and "Serenade: From Any Man to Any Woman." Both poems were inspired by the early years of World War II and were published in her 1942 collection "Street Songs."

The five leaf holograph manuscript with text on the front side of each numbered page consists of two poems both titled at the top and signed "Edith" at the bottom. Both poems, "Lullaby," and "Serenade: Any Man to Any Woman" appeared in her 1942 collection "Street Songs." In this manuscript, "Serenade" is titled "Any Man to Any Woman." Both were inspired by the early years of World War II and are ironically titled. "Lullaby," sung by a baboon, describes a chaotic, primeval world destroyed by wartime chaos and despair in which, "All is equal - blindness, sight/There is no depth, there is no height." "Serenade" spoken by a dying soldier, regards his love through the lens of death and destruction. He identifies his love with a cannon and invites her to "die with me and be my love" in a reversal of the famous Marlowe line.

Both poems are referenced in the Edith Sitwell papers at the Ransom Humanities Center. Viewed March 9, 2017

Source: Misko, Ellen, "A Study of Dame Edith Sitwell's Later Poems: 1940-1945" (1972). Dissertations. Paper 1211. Viewed March 9, 2017

Collection
Eleanor Vere Boyle (1825-1916) was an British artist of the Victorian era whose work consisted mainly of watercolor illustrations in children's books. Collection comprises an autograph letter, signed E. V. B., written by Boyle to Mr. [L?]awley on May 11, regarding payment for wine glasses and his portrait in the Pall Mall Magazine.

Collection comprises an autograph letter, signed E. V. B., written by Boyle to Mr. [L?]awley on May 11, regarding payment for wine glasses and his portrait in the Pall Mall Magazine. On her Huntercombe Manor, Maidenhead, letterhead.

Collection
Elizabeth Arden was a pioneering cosmetics entrepreneur. In this letter, she writes to advise a potential customer on matters relating to health and beauty. Arden advises her to get plenty of rest, eat a balanced diet, and to use products from Arden's Venetian line in order to soothe her chapped hands. Arden writes, "I know that where one is a busy housewife and has many duties in a country home, it is hard to get rest and relaxation. Perhaps you are of the naturally alert, quick, nervous type and use up a lot of energy everyday."

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter dated 1926 June 26 written by Elizabeth Arden to a Mrs. Hyatt, who had contacted her for advice after hearing her speak on the radio. Arden writes, "I know that where one is a busy housewife and has many duties in a country home, it is hard to get rest and relaxation. Perhaps you are of the naturally alert, quick, nervous type and use up a lot of energy everyday." Arden advises her to "get a little rest period at least once a day and relax in a quiet room or take a soothing, warm bath and a little nap," as well as to eat a healthy diet. She goes on to recommend products in her Venetian Preparations line that will soothe chapped hands, and encloses her booklet "The Quest of the Beautiful." On letterhead stationery from 673 Fifth Avenue embossed with the Venetian trademark.

Collection
Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz (December 5, 1822 – June 27, 1907) was an American educator, and the co-founder and first president of Radcliffe College. Collection comprises an autograph, signed letter Elizabeth Cary Agassiz wrote to Dr. Thomas Hill on January 20 [1886] regarding his article on her husband published in the Unitarian Review in December 1885. Also includes a printed photograph of her.

Collection comprises an autograph, signed letter Elizabeth Cary Agassiz wrote to Dr. Thomas Hill on January 20 [1886] regarding his article on her husband published in the Unitarian Review in December 1885. She notes that she was unable to follow his entire argument, "for the kingdoms of geometry are closed to me. But in reading it I am nonetheless conscious of a law which binds all things together...." Also includes a printed photograph of her.

Collection
Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was a novelist and short-story writer. Collection contains a letter Elizabeth Gaskell wrote to Ellen Nussey on [1855] July 27 regarding her work on her biography of Charlotte Brontë, and making arrangements to meet with Nussey to review any letters "which you may think it right to entrust me with." She refers to having already reviewed letters held by Mr. Nichols, Brontë's husband, but never mentions Brontë by name.

Collection contains a letter Elizabeth Gaskell wrote to Ellen Nussey on [1855] July 27 regarding her work on her biography of Charlotte Brontë, and making arrangements to meet with Nussey to review any letters "which you may think it right to entrust me with." She refers to having already reviewed letters held by Mr. Nichols, Brontë's husband, but never mentions Brontë by name.

Collection
Harrogate College Union is the alumnae association for Harrogate Ladies' College in Harrogate, England. The Union was established in 1895. Elizabeth Wilhelmina Jones, or M. E. Jones, was headmistress of the school 1898-1935. Collection comprises materials related to a celebration, hosted by the college union in 1959, of Elizabeth Wilhelmina Jones' 90th birthday, along with items related to her memorial the following year.

Collection comprises materials related to a celebration, hosted by the college union in 1959, of Elizabeth Wilhelmina Jones' 90th birthday, along with items related to her memorial the following year. Includes two newspaper clippings regarding the birthday; a related luncheon invitation, menu, and college union pin; two items associated with her memorial service; and a notice regarding a memorial fund to be established in her name. In addition, there are three black-and-white photographs of the birthday luncheon and one color photograph of Jones. The rest of the collection items are mainly forms related to photographic orders.

Collection
Collection comprises a full-color, four-page manuscript metamorphosis book, with verses and pen-and-watercolor illustrations by Elizabeth Winspear, who was possibly a resident of New England. Each page features two flaps that fold out in stages to reveal new illustrations. Characters include Adam and Eve, along with a lion, griffin, and eagle, and themes include the attainment of wealth, and impact of sickness and death. Includes a clamshell box.