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Carrie F. Young papers, 1872-1894 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 21 items

Carrie F. Young was one of the first advocates of women's suffrage in California, and was an activist for other political causes. Young eventually became a physician, the first woman to receive a medical diploma in California, from the Oakland College of Medicine in 1884. Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials.

Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials. There is a letter regarding political matters and a typescript page of general instructions for an unnamed convention, both written by Young's son, Robert E. Bush; a recommendation for Young's work on national campaigns as a Republican poltical activist and speaker, dated 1889; two advertisements for a Mrs. Dr. Tarbell's treatments of "nervous diseases and female complaints;" two pages of guidelines for a populist club; one of Young's calling cards; and an enclosure for the California Medical Journal. There is also a brochure for "photographic fern-leaf mottoes." In addition, there are 8 flyers, handbills, and broadsides, all advertising political speeches (especially for the People's Party), lectures, or medical work by Young, except for two that advertise speeches by Mrs. M. S. Singer of Chicago, and Dr. J. V. C. Smith. Collection also includes issues of the serials Life Crystals (March 1882, no. 3), edited by Young, and Pacific Journal of Health (January-September 1872, nos. 1-9), published by Young.

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Physician's account ledger and assorted papers from Dr. Charlotte Evans Page, a physician practicing in Lowell, Massachusetts, in the 1880s and 1890s.

Physician's account ledger with entries dating from 1884 through 1899, and miscellaneous correspondence and financial papers related to Page's family history and operations of her medical practice.

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M. Almina Stratton was a student in the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia. She received her M.D. in the second class the college graduated in 1859. Collection comprises manuscript notes (61 pages) maintained by M. Almina Stratton for her class in Materia Medica, entitled "Lectures on Materia Medica By Prof. Roerig, delivered in the Female Medical College In the session of 1858-9." Contains an additional 8 pages of her rules and advice for young ladies regarding gentlemen callers, proper behavior, and letter writing.

Collection comprises manuscript notes (61 pages) maintained by M. Almina Stratton for her class in Materia Medica, entitled "Lectures on Materia Medica By Prof. Roerig, delivered in the Female Medical College In the session of 1858-9." Contains an additional 8 pages of her rules and advice for young ladies regarding gentlemen callers, proper behavior, and letter writing.

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Dr. Mary J. Scarlett was a Quaker, born in 1822 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She devoted her early years to being a teacher in Chester County, Pennsylvania, then entered and graduated from the Woman's Medical College in 1857. In 1862, she became professor of anatomy at Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania.

Collection contains seven letters (22 pages) M. J. Scarlett wrote between 1845-1864. Two letters were addressed to her sister, Elizabeth (1845, 1849), and five to her niece (1858, 1860, 1863, 1864). In the letters she discussed details of her life at the time, from the teaching of students to the choosing of proper fabric for sewing a dress, making a comfortable sitting room, or studying public health and hygiene. She also mentioned many family matters. She commented on her hopes for the abolition of slavery and the infighting among abolitionists at a recent national meeting, and noted her puzzlement that those Quakers who would quickly speak as abolitionists would not also speak up on issues of faith within the Society of Friends. During the Civil War, she described the effect of the draft in Philadelphia, recorded the general concern that the Army of the Potomac needed to be successful, and pointed to camps nearby as well as to funerals passing. Collection also includes an undated broadside for "An Introductory Lecture to a Course on Physiology" to be delivered by Scarlett. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections (Duke University), the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection, and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Norma Taylor Mitchell was an American History professor at Troy University in Alabama and a lay leader in the United Methodist Church. These materials document her research and teaching career, as well as her church leadership.

The collection contains material documenting Mitchell's dissertation research on the Virginia politician David Campbell (1779-1859). Boxes 2-5 consist entirely of information on loose index cards. These materials also document Mitchell's research on the enslaved women who lived on Campbell's estate in Abington, VA. The collection also contains materials related to Mitchell's research on the Alabama physician Louise Branscomb. There are materials documenting Mitchell's professional activities and teaching career at what was then known as Troy State University. Mitchell's extensive service work in the Methodist Church at the local, regional, and national levels is also documented.