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Elizabeth Johnson Harris memoir, 1923 .1 Linear Feet — 22 x 35 cm. — Includes preservation photocopy and use photocopy

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85-page handwritten memoir supplemented with photographs and clippings documenting the personal and family history of poet and writer Elizabeth Johnson Harris of Augusta, GA, daughter of formerly enslaved parents. It includes her reflections on race relations, the place of African-Americans in society, as well as the importance of religion, education, and music in her life.

85-page handwritten manuscript in a bound notebook. It starts on the front side of the pages until the end of the notebook, where it continues from back to front on the backs of the pages. It covers her life in chronological order with the exception of some earlier stories recounted in later sections.

Harris divided the memoir into two sections: her childhood years and her life during and after her courtship and marriage. The manuscript also includes tipped in photographs and newsclippings. The photograph on the inside front cover above the dedication is an image of Johnson's adult daughter, Mattie Louise. The appendix contains the majority of the clippings, which consist of her poetry, several folk tales, and news stories about the Harris family.

The memoir describes Harris' childhood in Augusta, GA, race relations, her ambivalence about her place in society as an African-American, and the importance of religion and education in her life. She includes the story of her courtship and marriage, as well as descriptions of the adult lives of several of her children. Her son Charles Jacob Harris (1885-1988), was a classically trained pianist, composer, and teacher whose papers are also held by the Rubenstein Library.

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Collection comprises a deed of manumission for a "negro woman slave named Sophy and a negro girl named Sarah and a negro boy named Henry, children of said Sophy," former property of Sarah E. Murray of Anne Arundel County, Md., and then assigned to J. Nevett Steele of Baltimore, Maryland. The deed was signed and sealed by J. Nevett Steele and the administrator of Sarah E. Murray's personal estate, Mary Murray, then recorded in the [Howard?] District of Anne Arundel County on 1846 December 4. The deed was witnessed by Abner Neal and T.[Thomas] Hanson Belt.

Collection comprises a deed of manumission for a "negro woman slave named Sophy and a negro girl named Sarah and a negro boy named Henry, children of said Sophy," former property of Sarah E. Murray of Anne Arundel County, Md., and then assigned to J. Nevett Steele of Baltimore, Maryland. The deed was signed and sealed by J. Nevett Steele and the administrator of Sarah E. Murray's personal estate, Mary Murray, then recorded in the [Howard?] District of Anne Arundel County on 1846 December 4. The deed was witnessed by Abner Neal and T.[Thomas] Hanson Belt. Sophy was 37 years old, Sarah was 13 years old, and Henry was 10 years old at the time.

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The Noyes and Balch families resided primarily in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone. The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. There is a photograph album containing 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are also loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. She described the challenges of her teaching situation, social events and celebrations, local attitudes about freed blacks and her teaching them, black funeral and religious practices, and general conditions on the islands. She included her hand-drawn maps of the area, indicating its relation to the mainland. In addition to these letters from the Sea Islands, there are letters Catharine wrote while she was in Illinois and at the family home in Jamaica Plain, Mass., before she made her trip South (1854-1863). There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone.

The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. Common topics in all the letters include family news, health matters, visiting, travel plans, reading, lectures and church services attendance, theater performances, and pastimes. The photograph album contains 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are 31 cartes-de-visite and one tintype; two of the cartes-de-visite have been hand-painted. The majority of the photographs are labeled, several in ink in a later hand. In addition to the photograph album, there are 17 loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957, including 4 cartes-de-visite, 6 tintypes, and 2 photo postcards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Parker Pillsbury diaries, 1864-1896 2 Linear Feet — 33 pocket diaries

Parker Pillsbury (1809–1898) was an American minister, lecturer, newspaper editor, and advocate for abolition and women's rights. The collection is composed of 33 pocket diaries Parker Pillsbury kept for the years 1864 to 1896. The diaries offer a consistent, uninterrupted record of Pillsbury's life during these years, particularly his work fighting for the rights of women and African Americans and promoting Free Religion. Pillsbury records his interactions with leading social reformers of the nineteenth century, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Abby Kelley and Stephen S. Foster, Gerrit Smith, Wendell Phillips, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott, Robert Ingersoll, Charles Sumner, Henry Ward Beecher and Theodore Tilton among many others. His entries occasionally are accompanied by tipped in newspaper clippings about national events.

The collection is composed of 33 pocket diaries Parker Pillsbury kept for the years 1864 to 1896. The diaries contain a consistent, uninterrupted record of Pillsbury's life during these years.

Pillsbury wrote daily or nearly daily about the details of his life recording both the mundane and the profound. A typical entry begins with the weather and his location before providing the names of those with whom he met or correspondeded that day, events he attended, lectures he gave, or work he did. Pillsbury writes about his interactions with William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Abby Kelley and Stephen S. Foster, Gerrit Smith, Wendell Phillips, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott, the Allcott family, Robert Ingersoll, Charles Sumner, Henry Ward Beecher, Theodore Tilton and many other leading social reformers of the nineteenth century. His entries are occasionally accompanied by tipped in newspaper clippings about national events.

Due to their consistency and span, the diaries provide a decades' long chronology of Pillsbury's involvement with and importance in the major social reform movements of the late nineteenth century, and in particular, the women's rights movement with which he closely associated during these years. The diaries show him to be a ceaseless traveler, moving up and down the east coast, throughout New England, and through western New York and the Midwest, as he lectured, preached, attended women's suffrage conventions, and otherwise attempted to advance the causes of equal rights for women and African Americans and Free Religion.

The diaries illustrate his close and sustained relationship with major figures in the women's rights movements. He writes of his work as joint editor with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony of the Revolution from 1867 to 1870, and his continued friendship and partnership with Anthony in the following decades. He often visited her in Rochester, they lectured together, and he served as her advisor when she was put on trial in Albany by the State Supreme Court for voting without the right to do so.

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Thomas Smith was a resident of the burrough of Norfolk, Va. Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.