Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Names Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture Remove constraint Names: Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture
Number of results to display per page
View results as:

Search Results

Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham, NC records, 1894-1992

110 Linear Feet
The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the African-American community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a racically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the AfricanAmerican community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a radically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

1 result in this collection

World War II propaganda collection, 1939-1945

0.5 Linear Feet — 400 items
The collection includes pro-Allied, anti-Allied, pro-Axis, and anti-Axis propaganda leaflets and broadsides that were distributed in Europe and the Pacific war zones with the aim of damaging enemy morale and sustaining the morale of the occupied countries. Also includes a set of Special Service I.B.S. posters warning soldiers against venereal disease.

The collection includes pro-Allied, pro-Axis, and anti-Allie and anti-Axis propaganda in the form of flyers, broadsides, and leaflets that were distributed or dropped in the United States, England, Germany, occupied France, and the Pacific arena from 1939 and 1945. The majority of the leaflets are in German and were dropped by the Political Warfare Executive (PWE) over Germany. There is also a significant run of anti-Semitic, anti-Bolshevik, pro-German broadsides published by Theodor Kasse and the Deutscher Fichte-Bund of Hamburg, Germany, in English and intended for Allied audiences. The collection also contains propaganda leaflets from the Psychological Warfare Branch, U.S. Army Forces, Pacific Area, APO 500, most of which are in Japanese (most with English translations), some of them in Tok Pisin. There are also leaflets from the French exile government dropped over occupied France (in French, most accompanied by English translations); some propaganda newsletters, magazines and newspapers from France and the Netherlands (in English translation); German propaganda in English intended for dropping over Great Britain; some examples of Japanese propaganda (in Japanese); and a few single leaflets in Finnish, Russian, and Burmese. One notable portion of the collection is a set of broadsides illustrated by Pvt. Franklyn, printed by Special Service I.B.S., targeting American soldiers and warning them against loose women who may be infected with venereal disease. These posters often include the campaign's catchphrase, "Leave 'Em Alone! Don't be a Dope with a Dose."

1 result in this collection

Workers' Defense League records, 1940-1949

0.2 Linear Feet — 38 items
The Workers' Defense League was an American socialist organization devoted to promoting labor rights. Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization.

Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers' Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization. The main case was that of Odell Waller, a Virginia sharecropper sentenced to death in 1940 for killing his white landlord. Arguing that the landlord had cheated Waller and that he had in any case acted in self-defense, the WDL raised money for Waller's defense, lobbied for the commutation of his sentence, and mounted a nationwide publicity campaign on his behalf. The effort was unsuccessful, and Waller was executed on July 2, 1942. Other cases included Alton Levey, Rosario Chirillo, and Tee Davis; the organization worked in support of federal regulation to repeal poll taxes. Items include brochures on the Waller case, luncheon and dinner invitations, a tear sheet for an advertisement, action alerts, flyer announcing a contest and a mass meeting in New York, and contribution forms with mailing envelopes.

Also includes a fundraising mailer (1946 May 16) related to Tee Davis and sent by Lillian Smith, the author of the novel STRANGE FRUIT. Tee Davis was an African American from Arkansas who was sentenced to ten years in prison for assault with intent to kill. His crime was firing a shotgun towards the bottom of the front door to his home while an intruder tried to break in. The intruder was a white sheriff looking for thieves.

1 result in this collection

Womonwrites records, 1979-2014

3.0 Linear Feet — 1875 Items
Womonwrites is an annual conference of lesbian writers. Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, meeting evaluations, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

RESTRICTIONS: Membership mailings lists, in Box 3, are CLOSED until 2020.

1 result in this collection

Women Work! records, 1975-2009

17.1 Linear Feet
Women Work! improved women's economic security through job training, education, lobbying policymakers, and partnering with other national organizations. It was originally known as the Displaced Homemakers Network, and operated from 1978 until 2009. Accession (2009-0163) (12,375 items; 16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0163) (16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. CDs and other electronic data files have been removed and transferred to Duke's ERM server. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2015-0112) (0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1975-1990) is an addition that includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, administrative records, correspondance, and copies of the Network News, the publication for the Displaced Homemakers Network.

1 result in this collection

Women's Worship Circle records, 1992-2001

.2 Linear Feet
Materials documenting the Women's Worship Circle activities including correspondence, invitations, programs, handouts, liturgies, member reflections, photographs, planning and meeting notes and agendas.

The Women's Worship Circle records document the creation and operation of the organization, in which members engaged with and performed feminist theology through the development of their own worship services. The records consist of correspondence, liturgies, programs, meeting notes, handouts, members' reflections, photographs and invitations.

1 result in this collection

Women's Social and Political Union scrapbook, 1908-1917, undated

Online
0.9 Linear Feet
Collection comprises a scrapbook (96 pages) featuring primarily newspaper and magazine clippings that document the leaders, activists, actions and activities of the Women's Social and Political Union between 1908 and 1917. The unidentified compiler was likely a member of the organization, for she included handwritten labels identifying unnamed participants and often provided handwritten commentary on actions taken or the treatment of women imprisoned. In several cases, she was also able to obtain autographs of individual suffragists. Events documented include the 1913 Suffrage Pilgrimage, the memorial for Emily Wilding Davison, Rosa May Billinghurst, the Coronation procession, and the suffragist's bombing of Westminster Abbey. Other topics include what men did to get the vote; voting as a right; forcible feedings and other injuries the women sustained; marches, speeches, and gatherings of support; the work of the Pankhursts; women's activities in support of the war in Europe; the organization's offices; and international supporters of women's suffrage. Includes several items laid-in.
1 result in this collection

Women's Health Project poster, undated

1 Linear Foot
Collection comprises a poster that promotes the organization's "aims to make knowledge about women's bodies and health available to women," and to "develop policy about women's health with women." Important issues illustrated include affordable health care, stopping the spread of AIDS, and a woman's right to choose contraception. There is also contact information.
1 result in this collection

Women's Guild of Arts records, 1902-1949 and undated

0.2 Linear Feet — 88 items
The Women's Guild of Arts was founded in England in 1907 by textile designer and jeweller May Morris, and grew to about 60 members. The organization offered female artists an alternative to the Art Workers' Guild, the artists' association established in 1884 to encourage excellence in the fine and applied arts, and from which women were excluded until the 1960s. Collection comprises primarily 81 letters from 29 members of the Women's Guild of Arts between 1902 and 1949. There are 7 additional documents, including draft resolutions, certificates, lists, and notes.

Collection comprises primarily 81 letters from 29 members of the Women's Guild of Arts between 1902 and 1949. There are 7 additional documents, including draft resolutions, certificates, lists, and notes. Three letters predate the founding of the organization in 1907. The primary topic of the letters is the crisis within the Guild regarding its women-only status, an argument regarding how restrictive the Guild should be. Pamela Colman Smith wrote to May Morris (22 January 1913) that the reason she joined the Guild was that it made a point of asking its members not to exhibit at women-only shows, as it lowered the standard of work and that the Guild was never intended to be a purely woman's affair. Other letters on the subject come from Evelyn de Morgan, Feodora Gleichen, and Ethel Sandell. Gleichen's letter was circulated to members, and the collection contains a list of those who agreed with her; several letters are marked up to indicate a position on the matter. There is also a draft resolution welcoming any move to widen the scope of the Guild "such as stimulating and interesting lectures not only from our own members but from men and women outside....It is with this in view that we supported the resolution passed at the recent Annual Meeting, inviting as Honorary Associates a few people with whose work we are in sympathy..." (22 January 1913). Other topics in the letters include the role of the president, exhibitions, lectures, and the work of the organization, along with the William Morris Centenary Commemoration in 1934.

1 result in this collection

Women's Education Ephemera collection, 1806-1948

0.5 Linear Feet
Collection contains assorted examples of ephemeral manuscripts and printed materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin relating to women's education, largely dating from the 19th and early 20th century. Formats include: school catalogs and prospectuses (for both New England and Parisian institutes for young women); school certificates and merit awards; tuition receipts and other financial ephemera; some images of school buildings; student workbooks, penmanship books, and other classroom exercises; examples of correspondence between female students and their family or friends; and other assorted items including a journal kept by student Sophia Jane Griffith and a student list maintained by penmanship instructor J. P. Webster.
1 result in this collection

Women's and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Movements (LGBT) periodicals collection, 1957-2017

63 Linear Feet — 98 boxes
Since the 1960s, and particularly after the Stonewall uprising of 1969, the modern women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) have produced their own magazines, journals, newspapers, and newsletters as a strategy for unifying and galvanizing their constituencies. These periodicals served to inform movement activists about pertinent actions, news stories, and cultural trends unreported by the mainstream media. The Women's and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Periodicals Collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. A wide variety of periodical genres are represented here, including literary and art journals, newspapers, organizational newsletters, and popular culture magazines. The periodicals in this collection were donated by individuals, purchased, or separated from manuscript collections. Manuscript collections held by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library from which periodicals were separated are the Catherine Nicholson Papers; the Dan Kirsch Papers; the Kate Millett Papers; the Irene Peslikis Papers; the Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers; the Margaret McFadden Papers; and the Charis Books and More-Charis Circle Records. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The original collection numbered forty-one boxes. Additions in 2009, 2011 and 2012 expanded the collection.

1 result in this collection

Women-In-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc., Durham Chapter records, 1968-1998 and undated

Online
20.7 Linear Feet — 9000 Items
Non-profit, inter-racial organization founded in Durham, N.C. in September 1968; Elna Spaulding was founder and first president. Collection comprises correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, as well as information about the organization's relationship to the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C. Documents the organization's involvement in the Durham community on a variety of issues, including easing racial tensions; smoothing the way for court ordered school integration in 1970; providing for the recreational and cultural needs of disadvantaged youth; and establishing a clearinghouse to offer information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of social problems.

The records of Women-In-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc. (WIAPVC), an interracial community service non-profit organization based in Durham, North Carolina, span the years 1968 to 1998. Materials document the organization's history beginning with its foundation in 1968, and include correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, clippings, photographs, a scrapbook, awards, and other documentation of its activities and milestones. The records contain information about the organization's various projects and workshops, and its relationship with the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C., Inc. Persons associated with the organization included business, political, and community leaders and activists, among them Ann Atwater, Mrs. William A. Clement, Mrs. James E. Davis, Dr. Juanita Kreps, Mrs. H.M. Michaux, Mrs. Kenneth C. Royall, Margaret Rose Sanford, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, and Mrs. Albert Whiting. There are also letters of support from Senators B. Everett Jordan and Sam Erwin.

The bulk of the early items in the Correspondence Series, dating from 1968 to 1969, reflects the tenacity and persistence on the part of Spaulding, the first president, in seeking money for the organization's activities. She sought funding from national and North Carolina foundations and local businesses. Among the contributors were the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Grant Foundation, and the City of Durham. Money was also raised by dues paid by its members, which became a point of controversy for the organization.

The Administrative Files include agendas and minutes for WIAPVC's general, board, executive, and advisory committees. Agendas and programs for general meetings indicate that the leaders in the organization attempted to maintain a balance between focusing on some aspect of the group itself (such as its by-laws and self-evaluation) and programs of community-wide importance. The advisory committee evolved from the steering committee and was made up of subcommittee chairs.

Folders in the Subcommittees Series generally contain correspondence, reports, and guidelines. Records show that the number of subcommittees waxed and waned depending on the need for them. Subcommittees for which records exist include Civic Improvement, Education, Human Relations, and Police-Community Relations. The subcommittees undertook outreach and programs that were significant to Durham's community.

The organization's outreach activities are also documented in the Conferences, Workshops, and Projects series. Conferences and workshops sponsored by the organization reflect the group's efforts to improve itself, support other organizations, and reach out to provide service to the community. In the same series, WIAPVC projects indicate the wide range of interests and responsibilities which the organization sought to undertake. Among those represented in the files are the Center for School Support; the Clearinghouse, which offered information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of concerns; Cornwallis Housing Project, which helped provide recreational needs for youth residing in the project; the Cultural Experience Pilot Project, which allowed for 37 Durham junior high school students from low income families to spend three days in Washington; the Durham Emergency Energy Committee, which helped provide fuel to needy families in the Durham community; and various intern projects, in which students from the Duke Divinity School Field Education Program participated.

The bulk of the processed collection consists of the early records of the WIAPVC. Later years (1980s-1990s) are represented in Accession 1996-0164 and Accession 2008-0104, which include financial activities, projects, administrative files, reports, event planning information, newsletters, and awards ceremonies.

1 result in this collection

"Woman: the World Over": a lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern, 1901

Online
49 items — 1 box; 1 pamphlet binder — 48 glass lantern slides; one printed booklet — Slides measure 3 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches — 48 glass slides; 1 printed booklet.
Collection consists of a commercially produced set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides entitled "Woman: The World Over," published in 1901 by Riley Brothers in Bradford, England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set lists 53 slides in all, and contains detailed lecture-format captions. The women in the portraits represent nations around the world. Subjects include women of different classes; married women and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, with children, and in roles which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. Other slides show women working in agricultural, service, and industrial settings, and gambling and climbing mountains. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. Lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, and changing social norms as the 20th century begins. One slide is black-and-white. All titles are original, as is the slide sequence. Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection consists of a nearly complete lecture set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides published in England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set bears the full title, "Woman: the world over. A lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern." The price appearing on the booklet is sixpence.

The booklet lists 53 slides in this set, and contains detailed lecture-format captions which would be read aloud as the slides were projected. The series is incomplete: numbers 28, 47, 48, 51, 53, and 54 are not present. Titles are also printed along the mount edges of each slide but are obscured in a few cases by black repair tape. All titles are original, as is the slide order. The titles and lecture script contain historical terms and language that may be offensive to modern-day audiences. The slides measure 3 1/4 inches square (83 x 83 mm).

The slides and lecture notes were originally arranged in six series, retained in this description: Woman in Society; The Domestic Woman; Woman in Subjection; Emancipated Woman; Woman the Breadwinner; and Angelic Woman.

The women in the portraits represent races, cultures and nations around the world, among which British Guiana, China, Iceland, India, Japan, Netherlands, the Philippines, Russia, Switzerland, Tonga, Tunisia, and the U.S. There are portraits of women with high social status, married women, and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, women with children, and in roles of subjugation which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. A few images include men.

The series "Woman the Breadwinner" includes agricultural, craft, and industrial scenes, and a slide of women nurses attending to patients. The "Emancipated Woman" series includes an actress, a group of nurses, and women mountaineering. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters for the Women's Christian Temperance Union from 1892 to 1926. Titles are present on the edges of most of the glass slide mounts, and are listed in full in the booklet.

The booklet's lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, as well as changing social norms as the 20th century begins. The series ends with romantic images of ideal women, chiefly through the lens of courtship and beauty. Most of the missing slides are from this group.

The set held by the Rubenstein is numbered 1239 in the lecture booklet. There is no date on either the slides or the booklet, but the Women's Temple in Chigago, completed in 1892, provides the earliest date. A slide entitled "Wife of the Khedive" helps provide the latest date: the Egyptian title "Khedive" was last used in 1914. The Lucerna Magic Lantern Web Resource (viewed online November 8 2017) gives the publisher as the Riley Brothers of Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and the publication date as 1901.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

1 result in this collection

Woman's suffrage realia collection, 1894-1915 and undated.

45 items
Collection comprises 43 woman's suffrage movement buttons, pins, pencil, and badges, along with a contemporary hair pins tin used to hold 32 of the items. There are materials from suffrage movements in both the United Kingdom and the United States. Also includes two "Votes for Women" souvenir and program paper napkins for a march and a demonstration in London.

Collection comprises 43 woman's suffrage movement buttons, pins, pencil, and badges, along with a contemporary hair pins tin used to hold 32 of the items. There are materials from suffrage movements in both the United Kingdom and the United States. Organizations present include the Woman's Peace Party, Catholic Women's Suffrage Society, Women's Freedom League, National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, Cymeric Suffrage Union, Men's League for Women's Suffrage, Women's Social and Political Union (W.S.P.U.), and the Woman's Suffrage National Aid Corps, an organization for which there is a badge as well. One pin advocates "Votes for Women, 1915," another, "Votes for Women, Patriotism." Includes a pencil from the Women's Freedom League, which was intended to be worn on a necklace. There are several anti-suffrage buttons and pins from the United States, as well, along with buttons featuring portraits of women suffragists, and a Woman's Christian Temperance Union Liberty Bell pin. Includes a badge to the 37th annual convention of the New York State Woman Suffrage Association, held in Rochester, October 24-27, 1905. Consists of a yellow ribbon with pin at top and a medallion portrait of Susan B. Anthony attached at bottom of ribbon. Also present is a "Votes for Women" enamel flag pin that was worn by supporters in both countries.

Also includes two "Votes for Women" souvenir and program paper napkins for a march and a demonstration in London. The napkins feature decorative borders.

1 result in this collection

Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences graded embroidery examination with stitch samples, 1919

0.1 Linear Feet — 11 items
Collection comprises a four-page embroidery examination completed in ink by Mrs. Fred Kennedy in Norfolk, Nebraska, including 6 stitch samples. The exam did not provide the questions, and has been annotated by the person who graded it, who also attached four typed comments to the stitch samples. Includes original mailing envelope.
1 result in this collection

We want aid that advances women [poster], undated

1 Linear Foot
Group of Ten Lakas ng Kababaihan, Inc. was established in 1962 as an informal group of countries that contribute to General Arrangements to Borrow (GAB). Collection comprises a poster protesting against IMF that Aggr[e]vates Inequality and Disempowerment of "poor southern women." Published in Quezon City, Philippines.

Collection comprises a poster protesting against IMF that Aggr[e]vates Inequality and Disempowerment of "poor southern women." Published in Quezon City, Philippines. Images reflect the areas women wish funding to be directed instead, including ecofeminism, reproductive health, leadership organizing, education, economic development, and promoting programs that end violence against women.

1 result in this collection

Warren G. Harding letter to Harriet Taylor Upton, 1917 February 11, 1917 February 11

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Collection comprises a letter written by the United States Senator from Ohio Warren G. Harding to the suffragist Harriet Taylor Upton regarding support for women's suffrage. Harding responds to a telegram from Upton asking him to use his influence on Ohio State Senator U.G. Murrell in support of women's voting rights. Harding replies that he is "reluctant" to advise Murrell on the matter because of his previous experience with Murrell while Harding was a member of the Ohio General Assembly.

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter on Senator Warren G. Harding's United States Senate letterhead dated 1917 February 11. Senator Harding writes to suffragist Mrs. Harriet Taylor Upton of Warren, Ohio, "I beg to acknowledge your telegram of February 4. By reason of my former experience as a member of the Senate of Ohio General Assembly, I would be reluctant to advise Senator Murrell of Clinton County as to his ultimate action on the suffrage matter." Murrell was a member of the Ohio General Assembly. By 1917, Senator Harding was prepared to vote in the affirmative on the issue of women's suffrage. Harriet Upton was was hoping to leverage his influence to generate similar support in their home state of Ohio.

1 result in this collection

Vita Sackville-West papers, 1953-1961 and undated

0.1 Linear Feet — 7 items
The collection consists of five typescript letters, one photocopied Encyclopedia Britannica article regarding Sackville-West's book "Aphara Behn" in the "Representative Women" series, along with a poem. The first letter, one page addressed to Sackville-West, dated 1953 May 22, signed "A. Purvis," discusses the birthplace and date of Aphra Behn. A photocopy of the Encyclopedia Britannica article on Behn is included. A typescript note dated 18 July, 1961, signed V. Sackville-West on Sissinghurst letterhead, was written in response to a letter from Sylvia Haymon about Aphra Behn, and Sackville-West's article on Behn in the Encyclopedia Britannica. Included are copies of three letters, all dated 1961, sent to Sylvia Haymon, two to Sackville-West, and one to Miss J. Parfitt, Acting Editor of the Women's Page of The Times in London. The topics of the undated, one-page "Diary-Poem" have to do with Sackville-West's loss of her given name upon her marriage to Harold Nicolson in 1913, and the loss of Knole, her family's estate in Kent, in 1928 because of patriarchal inheritance laws.

The collection consists of five typescript letters, one photocopied Encyclopedia Britannica article regarding Sackville-West's book "Afara Behn" in the "Representative Women" series, along with a poem. The first letter, one page addressed to Sackville-West, dated 1953 May 22, signed "A. Purvis," discusses the birthplace and date of Aphra Behn. A photocopy of the Encyclopedia Britannica article on Behn is included. A typescript note dated 18 July, 1961, signed V. Sackville-West on Sissinghurst letterhead, was written in response to a letter from Sylvia Haymon about Aphra Behn, and Sackville-West's article on Behn in the Encyclopedia Britannica. Included are copies of three letters, all dated 1961, sent to Sylvia Haymon, two to Sackville-West, and one to Miss J. Parfitt, Acting Editor of the Women's Page of The Times in London. The topics of the undated, one-page "Diary-Poem" have to do with Sackville-West's loss of her given name upon her marriage to Harold Nicolson in 1913, and the loss of Knole, her family's estate in Kent, in 1928 because of patriarchal inheritance laws.

1 result in this collection

Virginia Woolf's oak writing desk, between 1904-1907

2.5 Linear Feet — 67.4 x 126 x 87.7 cm; 26.5 x 49.5 x 34.5 inches
Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath. Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath.Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

1 result in this collection

Virginia Woolf letter and photograph, around 1930

0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items
Virginia Woolf was an English writer and publisher, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

1 result in this collection

Victoria Ortiz papers, 1923-1999 and undated, bulk 1960-1990

12.2 Linear Feet — 19.0 linear feet; approx. 14,999 Items

The Victoria Ortiz Papers span the years 1923 to 1999, with the majority of the papers dating from 1960 to 1990. The main collection (2003-0204) comprises materials separated from the Bobbye S. Ortiz Papers and consists of one series; the accession number 2003-0204 was assigned to this grouping. Viki Ortiz's political and intellectual interests can be gleaned from the topics in the Victoria Ortiz Subject Files Series, which has been divided into seven subseries to facilitate its use. The first three subseries contain newspaper and magazine articles, organizational materials, photographs, pamphlets, speeches, and reports related to Cuba, Mexico, and Latin America. Scholars of U.S. anticommunism and student movements in the 1960s may find of interest materials related to Ortiz's 1963 trip to Cuba, taken with 58 other college students in defiance of U.S. policy. Each subseries is organized alphabetically by topic or title.

The parallels and differences between Viki's and Bobbye's political interests are reflected in their subject files. Both maintained extensive collections of materials on international women's liberation; like her mother, Viki was most interested in the status of women in Latin American nations. Yet while they shared similar social values and political beliefs, Viki's interests often diverged from her mother's. Viki's general files reflect her involvement in International Year of the Woman activities and her interest in population control, as well as her interest in such topics as reproductive rights, family structure, and economic justice.

Viki's great interest in adoption and parenting grew out of her own experiences as a single adoptive parent of a Mexican-born child. The subseries on adoption and parenting includes newsletters and publications of organizations for single parents; research for a book on single adoptive parenting; and miscellaneous clippings, notes, and other materials on issues such as adoptive parenting, international adoption, and gay/lesbian parenting. These materials are arranged alphabetically by topic or title.

The final subseries contains Viki's extensive notes and other materials related to literature. This subseries is organized into coursework, general literature, and Latin American literature, and is arranged alphabetically therein.

The addition (2003-0066) consists primarily of professional and subject files documenting Ortiz's law career, writings, and feminist and social activism. Her work on the literature and women's issues of Latin America are particularly well-represented. Portions of this addition are closed to use until 2050.

Addition (05-024) (3759 items, 7.7 lin. ft.; dated 1923-1997 and n.d) comprises research materials pertaining to gender, women, and the law; artist Elizabeth Catlett; and experimentation with LSD by the U.S. military. Includes family documents about Camilo, Ortiz's adopted son; teaching materials; files from CUNY law school; correspondence, appointment calendars; videotapes; travel diaries; photographs, printed material; and ephemera. This addition is closed to use until 2050.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Veteran Feminists of America records, 1971-2017

30.4 Linear Feet — 30.4 lin. ft.
Veteran Feminists of America (VFA) is a nonprofit organization for veterans of the Second Wave of the feminist movement. It was founded by Jacqueline Ceballos and held its first feminist reunion in 1993. The organization continues to operate today, sponsoring reunions, programs, and publications honoring feminists throughout the United States. The accession (2008-0286) includes administrative files, program and reunion materials, obituaries, correspondence, financial information, newsletters, periodicals, and photographs relating to the activities and programs of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs, floppy disks, and CDs, some of which have been withdrawn for electronic preservation. There are also medals and other ephemera. The addition (2008-0254) consists of DVDs of VFA events and interviews. Addition (2009-0131) includes administrative files, events files, and other organizational information. Addition (2010-0097) includes program information and other organizational files, predominately from VFA's conference, The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders, held in Dallas in March 2010. Addition (2010-0128) includes honoree information forms and materials from the Dallas conference. Addition (2012-0083) includes a program from the Tribute to Helen Reddy event (2006) and two copies of an associated commerically-available music compact disc by Sandy Rapp; along with the souvenir program from the VFA salute to feminist lawyers (2009). Addition (2017-0058) includes conference programs from several conferences that took place in the early 2000's and 2010's. The addition also includes meeting minutes from the annual VFA board meeting. Addition (2017-0139) includes administrative files and planning materials for different events that documented the history of VFA and the Second Wave Feminist Movement; along with a history of VFA (2013). Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection (2008-0286) includes administrative files, program and reunion materials, obituaries, correspondence, financial information, newsletters, periodicals, and photographs relating to the activities and programs of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs, floppy disks, and CDs, some of which have been withdrawn for electronic preservation. There are also medals and other ephemera. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The addition (2008-0254) (64 items; 1.2 lin. ft.) consists of DVDs of VFA events and interviews.

The addition (2009-0131) (900 items; 1.8 lin. ft., dated 2001-2008) consists of board minutes, administrative materials, program files, some correspondence, and publicity. Program files include reunions, special presentations, conferences on feminist history and issues, and other educational and commemorative events. In particular, the accession includes materials from the Salute to Feminist Lawyers event put on in June 2008 at the Harvard Club in New York.

The addition (2010-0097) (300 items; 0.6 lin. ft., dated 2005-2010) includes miscellaneous newsletters, dated 2005-2008; board meeting minutes from 2007; event and program files from a 2009 Pompano Beach, FL awards gala and a Dallas conference entitled The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders, held March 2010. The Dallas event files include copies of materials on 22 honorees, as well as the program text and other promotional materials. Other topics in this accession include website initiatives and the Feminists Who Changed America book launch.

The addition (2010-0128) (150 items; 0.6 lin. ft., dated 2009-2010) includes materials submitted by honorees at the "The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders" conference held by the VFA in Dallas. Materials include information forms, resumes, essays, and other miscellaneous biographies.

The addition (2012-0083) (4 items; 0.1 lin. ft., dated 2006, 2009) includes a program from the Tribute to Helen Reddy event (2006) and two copies of an associated commerically-available music compact disc by Sandy Rapp; along with the souvenir program from the VFA salute to feminist lawyers (2009).

The addition (2015-0069) (1800 items; 3.0 lin. ft., dated 2011-2014) consists of event information, program and administrative files relating to the activities of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs of event programming, including the Kate Millett festival (2012), and Labor and the Women's Movement (2014).

The addition (2017-0058) (.2 lin. ft., dated 2002-2017) consists of program and administrative files related to the operation of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media includes two DVDs; one is of the Harvard Club Luncheon (2014) and the other is of the Veteran Feminist Association South Florida Luncheon (2009).

The addition (2017-0139) (.2 lin. ft., dated 2007-2017 consists of administrative and program files related to the activities of the Veteran Feminists of America.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Vera Brittain letter to John Middleton Murry, 1946 September 13

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Vera Brittain was an English writer and pacifist activist best known for her World War I memoir Testament of Youth. The Vera Brittain letter to critia and editor John Middleton Murry concerns matters relating to the publishing and financing of Murry's literary, socialist, and pacifist magazine The Adelphi. Brittain also writes of her pacifism as it relates to concerns about nuclear warfare in the immediate aftermath of World War II.

Consists of a single typescript letter from Brittain to the critic and editor John Middleton Murry dated September 13, 1946. Single-page, with text on front and back written on letterhead reading "2 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea S.W.3." Brittain comments on the revival of Murry's The Adelphi, and on strategies to finance such literary magazines. The second part of the letter discusses her opinions on methods of pacifist activism, particuarly as related to nuclear war. The postscript discusses the forthcoming publication of John Hersey's 1946 book Hiroshima. She comments, "If only the world could read it, the 'next war' would move much further off." It is signed "Vera."

1 result in this collection

Triangle Raging Grannies records, 1998-2015

.5 Linear Feet
Raging Grannies is an activist organization that promotes peace, justice and social and economic equality by raising consciousness through song and satire. They also aim to challenge stereotypical assumptions about advocacy and aging. This collection contains materials documenting the Triangle chapter of the Raging Grannies in North Carolina from 1998-2015.

The Triangle Raging Grannies records consist of photographs, newspaper clippings, protest song lyrics, member lists, flyers and other paraphernalia related to the activities of the organization around the Triangle area of North Carolina.

1 result in this collection

Triangle Community Works records, 1974-2008

5.5 Linear Feet — 4125 Items
Triangle Community Works! was formed in 1994 and consists of a coalition of groups, including ASPYN (A Safer Place Youth Network), The Gay and Lesbian Helpline, P-FLAG (Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays), and RRNGLE (Raleigh Religious Network for Gay and Lesbian Equality). Collection includes historical documents from several groups in Triangle Community Works!, including ASPYN, RRNGLE, and the Gay and Lesbian Helpline. Materials date from the 1970s to 2008.

This collection (Accession 2009-0276) includes historical documents from several groups in Triangle Community Works!, including ASPYN, RRNGLE, and the Gay and Lesbian Helpline. Materials date from the 1970s to 2008 and include news clippings, newsletters, publicity materials, meeting minutes, organizational records, and administrative files.

1 result in this collection

Triangle Business and Professional Guild records, 1970-2006

1.5 Linear Feet — 900 items
According to the Triangle Business and Professional Guild bylaws, the TBPG aims to establish a network of business and professional resources, to encourage fellowship and support among businesses, professionals, and charitable pursuits, and to provide and promote positive role models in the gay and lesbian community, particularly in the Triangle (Raleigh, Chapel Hill, and Durham) area of North Carolina. This organization was founded in the early 1990s and is based in Raleigh. Accession (2008-0168) (900 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1970-2006) includes TBPG newsletters from 1993-2006, news clippings highlighting the lesbian and gay communities, and some administrative material. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2008-0168) (900 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1970-2006) includes TBPG newsletters from 1993-2006, news clippings highlighting the lesbian and gay communities, and some administrative material. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Tijuana Bibles collection, 1930s-1998

3 Linear Feet — 500 items
Tijuana Bibles, also known as eight-pagers or dirty little books, were small eight-page publications of cartoon erotica and pornography that became popular during the 1930s and 1940s. This collection includes about 400 Tijuana Bibles, some of them duplicates; a few folders of erotica drawings and drafts by an unknown artist; and printed material about Tijuana Bibles, published from the 1970s through the 1990s.

The Tijuana Bibles Collection consists of about 400 Tijuana bibles, some printed material about the bibles and the phenomenon as a whole, and an anonymous author's sketches and drawings of characters and plots.

The Tijuana bibles include a wide range of characters, many inspired by (or lifted from) mainstream media and celebrities. The most frequently used characters were from newspaper comic strips, including Andy Gump, Betty Boop, Blondie and Dagwood, Dick Tracy, Ella Cinders, Dumb Dora, Wimpy, Pete the Tramp, Tillie the Toiler, and Popeye. Other bibles include generic figures such as travelling salesmen (including a vacuum cleaner man, a book salesman, a radio salesmen, and so on); parodies of real people, including Nazis, boxer Joe Louis, and other celebrities; or versions of popular movie heroines, such as Snow White or Mae West.

The collection held in Rubenstein Library consists largely of Tijuana bibles, but also include other small pornographic cartoon or comic joke books, similar in design and in manufacturing quality, but not entirely true to the "traditional" form of a Tijuana bible. There are also Tijuana bible reproductions in this series.

The manuscript materials accompanying the bibles consist of drafts and sketches for two strips, one featuring Wahoo and the other featuring Li'l Abner and Daisy Mae. Also included is a draft of "Fritzi Ritz in 'Kisses for Sale'." This series also includes pornographic drawings of generic female characters, some with and some without text. These do not appear to be taken from any particular Tijuana bible. All of the manuscript material is anonymous and undated.

Finally, the collection also includes a series of books about Tijuana bibles, compiled by the collector, including reprints of some of the bibles as well as essays or historical introductions to the genre. These books were published between 1971 and 1998.

1 result in this collection

Thomas Smith deed of manumission, 1803 July 19

1.0 Linear Foot — 1 item
Thomas Smith was a resident of the burrough of Norfolk, Va. Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

1 result in this collection

Third Wave Foundation records, 1992-2011

3.5 Linear Feet — 2600 Items
Feminist activist organization that works nationally to support young women and transgender youth. Collection includes administrative files, fundraising materials, grant partner information, photographs, clippings, and conference materials. Also includes restricted electronic information. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes some administrative files, grant materials, research, fundraising, and conference files from the duration of Third Wave's existence, with the majority of files dating 1997-2006. Also includes photographs and clippings collected by Third Wave documenting various events and activities. Some materials are restricted, including board meeting minutes, electronic records, and audiovisual tapes. Please contact Research Services before visiting the library to use this collection.

Collection acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Third Side Press records, 1991-2003

13.2 Linear Feet — 8775 items
Third Side Press, a feminist publisher of women's health and lesbian fiction books, was founded in 1991 and ceased active publication in 1998. It was dissolved as a corporation in 2003. During the years of active publication, Third Side Press produced between 20 and 25 titles, mostly in paperback, including top sellers such as CANCER AS A WOMEN'S ISSUE and THE WOMAN-CENTERED ECONOMY. Midge Stocker is the founder and publisher of Third Side Press. Materials include correspondence, financial records, book proofs and files, book reviews, and other records relating to the operation of Third Side Press publishing house. Also includes copies of several Third Side Press publications. Floppy disks and other electronic materials have been removed for preservation. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Materials include correspondence, financial records, book proofs and files, book reviews, and other records relating to the operation of Third Side Press publishing house. Also includes copies of several Third Side Press publications. Floppy disks and other electronic materials have been removed for preservation. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

The way it was, or at least how I remember experiencing it, 1980-1986

0.6 Linear Feet — 1 upright hollinger, 1 upright half-hollinger — 956 typescript pages
Collection comprises Lola Frances Wilson Smith's 920-page typescript autobiography, including Wilson and Carroll family history, focusing on the period between 1909, when her parents married, and 1944, when she gave birth to her first child. Includes an additional 36 pages of introductory material where Smith describes herself. Smith accompanies her narrative with hand-drawn maps and illustrations or photocopies of illustrative material from other sources. She also includes copies of documents (marriage licenses, government documents, certificates, etc.) obituaries, genealogical charts, newspaper articles, family photographs, and private letters. Pages 885 to 920 are included as representative of Smith's working draft for the piece.
1 result in this collection

The United Family Gazette and envelope, 1840-1895

0.1 Linear Feet
Collection comprises a handwritten copy of the Gazette (11 pgs, handstitched), plus an envelope. The Gazette contained a personal and detailed account of the marriage of Charlotte Elizabeth Octavia Collinson (1817-1850) to Charles Stansfield Rawson (1812-1863). The writer of the account was unidentified, but was probably one of Collinson's sisters. There are sections on the bridesmaids, ceremony, cake, wedding breakfast, and other celebrations, as well as desciptions of various family members. Rawson lived at Nether Wasdale, Cumberland, and married Charlotte at Boldon Church on Feb. 18, 1840. Later, two of their sons went to Queensland, where they made a fortune in ranching and pioneered the settlement of Mckay. The envelope, postmarked 1895, is illustrated and addressed to E. Rawson, Imperial Hotel, Brisbane, Queensland.

Collection comprises a handwritten copy of the United Family Gazette (11 pgs, handstitched), plus an envelope. The Gazette contained a personal and detailed account of the marriage of Charlotte Elizabeth Octavia Collinson (1817-1850) to Charles Stansfield Rawson (1812-1863). The writer of the account was unidentified, but was probably one of Collinson's sisters. There are sections on the bridesmaids, ceremony, cake, wedding breakfast, and other celebrations, as well as desciptions of various family members. Rawson lived at Nether Wasdale, Cumberland, and married Charlotte at Boldon Church on Feb. 18, 1840. Later, two of their sons went to Queensland, where they made a fortune in ranching and pioneered the settlement of Mckay. The envelope, postmarked 1895, is illustrated and addressed to E. Rawson, Imperial Hotel, Brisbane, Queensland.

1 result in this collection

Theresa El-Amin papers, 1960s-2010

Online
30 Linear Feet — 22,500 Items
Activist and union organizer who was involved with the Coalition of Labor Union Women, the Service Employees International Union, the Black Radical Congress, the Black Workers for Justice, Jobs with Justice, Solidarity, and the Durham NAACP. El-Amin was also a founding member of the Labor Party and the Southern Anti-Racism Network. Organizational and subject files from El-Amin's years of activism and organizing in the Service Employees International Union, the Black Radical Congress, the Southern Anti-Racism Network, and numerous other groups and causes. Also includes publications, photographs, videotapes, and correspondence.

The Theresa El-Amin Papers have been divided into series: Organizations and Movements, Subject Files, Conferences, Personal Files and Correspondence, Printed Materials, Photographs and Audiovisual, Black Liberation Historical Documents, Realia, and Oversize Materials. The largest series, Organizations and Movements, features materials from El-Amin's long career as an activist and union organizer with groups such as Black Workers for Justice, the Service Employees International Union, Jobs with Justice, the Green Party of the United States, the NAACP, the Coalition of Labor Union Women, the Black Radical Congress, Solidarity, and the Southern Anti-Racism Network. Other highlights of the Organizations and Movements series include the Black Liberation movement and the Free Mumia Abu-Jamal movement. There are also numerous other groups and movements represented within this series. Contents typically include handouts and fliers from various events; email correspondence; reports and publications from different groups, including some newsletters; and clippings with coverage of different campaigns and activities.

The Subject Files series was largely created by El-Amin, with additional subjects added in processing to account for loose pages in the collection. Topics heavily represented include Muhammad Ahmad, community organizing and its many components, healthcare, South Africa and apartheid, North Carolina, and workplace safety. There are also subject files for several countries, as well as materials about Hurricane Katrina.

The Printed Materials series includes newsletters, magazines, journals, fliers, handouts, and other miscellaneous materials from a wide variety of sources. The first box contains runs of various periodicals, including Forward Motion, In Defense of Marxism, and Labor Notes. These runs are incomplete and represent only a sampling of the publication. The second box of printed materials relates largely to El-Amin's union involvement, and features miscellaneous union publications from the 1980s-2000s. There is a small amount of earlier material, mainly in the Historical Pamphlets folder, which includes publications on desegregation and its impact on unions. The remainder of the series is also largely miscellaneous, with one or two issues of a wide range of newsletters, magazines, or organizational reports.

The small Conferences series contains conference books, fliers, correspondence, and handouts from various conferences El-Amin attended between 1985 and 2010. There is some overlap between this series and the Organizations and Movements series. Another small series is El-Amin's Personal Files and Correspondence, which consists largely of certificates and other remnants of her professional organizing education and career. This series also includes copies of her resumes and a 1997 oral history transcript.

The Photographs and Audiovisual Materials series includes large amounts of loose photographs, labeled by El-Amin, documenting many of the organizations, activities, and events referenced in earlier portions of the collection. It also includes some personal photographs of El-Amin's family and friends. The VHS tapes in this series document a range of protests and issues important to the BWFJ and El-Amin's union organizing.

Articles and pamphlets acquired by El-Amin relating to the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation movement of the 1960s are included in the Black Liberation Historical Documents series. Highlights include a transcript of Stokely Carmichael, Chairman of SNCC, speaking at the 1966 Berkeley conference on "Black Power and its Challenges." Includes articles on the condition of African Americans by Bayard Rustin, as well as coverage of the Watts riot and recovery of the Watts area. Also includes several issues of Commentary Reports from the 1960s.

The Realia series is largely unsorted, but includes three boxes of t-shirts and one box of buttons and other ephemera collected by El-Amin in her years as an activist.

Finally, the Oversize Materials contains objects withdrawn from their respective series due to their large size. These include Jobs with Justice foam boards and posters.

1 result in this collection

Takey Crist papers, 1944-2002 and undated

64.6 Linear Feet — 21,903 Items

Accession 2002-149(778 items, 22.0 linear feet; dated 1971-2001) contains files of abortion, pregnancy, and hysterectomy malpractice cases in which Crist served as a consultant or codefendant along with the Crist Clinic. There is also printed material on reproductive topics. Also includes 2 VHS videocassettes; 6 color slides; 30 black-and-white and 2 color photographs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition 2003-007 (67 items, 7.3 linear ft.; undated) is composed of 16mm films used by "Crist Clinic Audio Visuals" in health education programs (undated). The clinic also offered the films for sale or rent to educators, students, doctors, parents, and others. The majority of the films focus on sex education for children and teenagers. Topics include puberty and menstruation, sex and sexuality, sexual orientation, lifestyle choices, and sexually transmitted diseases. Other topics include abortion; pregnancy and childbirth; infant care and nutrition; marriage and parenting; and drug and alcohol abuse.

Addition 2003-118 is comprised of materials related to the issue of abortion and the anti-abortion movement, and consists primarily of documents pertaining to lawsuits involving Dr. Crist as a litigant or witness, including correspondence, transcripts, depositions, photographs, and other legal papers (1975-1993). Also contains files on organizations including the National Abortion Federation and NARAL (1982-2002 and undated); subject files; research material assembled by Dr. Crist, including publications; correspondence; and newspaper clippings.

Addition 2004-098 (10,158 items, 16.7 lin. ft.; dated 1962-1980s, bulk 1962-1972) comprises personal and professional correspondence and subject files (1960s-early 1970s) documenting Crist's medical training, internship, residency, and then his position as Assistant Professor at UNC Chapel Hill, especially his involvement in increased access to therapeutic abortions and health services; the development of abortion techniques; and sex and contraceptive education on and off campus. Also includes writings and speeches; patient notes (redacted); grant, research, and conference files; and printed materials, including clippings, articles, and pamphlets. Some anti-abortion materials in boxes 3-5 contain graphic imagery.

Addition 2006-098 (400 items, 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 1944-1978) consists of personal files, including medical licenses and report cards; abortion series files, 1971-2000, including general correspondence, correspondence concerning the National Organization of Women and the National Coalition of Abortion Providers; newsletters; printed material about the ordinance lawsuit; photographs of demonstrators, 1985; and subject files, 1960-1972, created while at UNC including files about conferences, homosexuality, consultation work for family planning, studies conducted while at UNC Medical School, speaking engagements on sex education; and Health Education Clinic finances. Interfiled in existing collection.

Addition 2007-043 (13,125 items, 21.0 linear feet) contains subject files that chronicle the history of the Crist Clinic from the opening of the clinic in 1973 to the early 21st century. The majority of the files contain Takey Crist's clippings on medical topics and issues relating to sex education and women's health care. Many files also refer to issues of significance for physicians running a private clinic.

1 result in this collection

Sylvia Norton papers, 1926-1938

0.6 Linear Feet — 200 Items
Resident of Stockton and San Francisco, California. Collection consists of manuscript and typewritten letters, written primarily to Sylvia Norton from her family, dealing with their financial struggles during the Great Depression. Also contains manuscripts of poetry and short stories written by either Sylvia or Lillian Norton under the name (Frances) Elliott Norton. Correspondence with author and critic Laurence D'Orsay discusses Elliott Norton's writing abilities. There are also a few news clippings, legal documents, and some biographical materials. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of manuscript and typewritten letters, written primarily to Sylvia Norton from her family, dealing with their financial struggles during the Great Depression. Also contains manuscripts of poetry and short stories written by either Sylvia or Lillian Norton under the name (Frances) Elliott Norton. Correspondence with author and critic Laurence D'Orsay discusses Elliott Norton's writing abilities. There are also a few news clippings, legal documents, and some biographical materials.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Sybil Thorndike letter to Elizabeth Robins, 1922 September 21

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Dame Sybil Thorndike was a distinguished British actress best known for her work on stage. In this letter to the actress and playwright Elizabeth Robins, Thorndike thanks her for the gift of some heather from Yorkshire. She also sends her regards and thanks to "Lady Bell" for her support. The letter is addressed to Robins at Rounton Grange, the North Yorkshire estate which was the family home of the writer Florence Bell ("Lady Bell"). Bell and Robins were close friends and collaborators. Thorndike refers to a play; at the time of this letter, she was in rehearsals for the 1922-23 London production of Shelley's The Cenci at the New Theater, directed by her husband, Lewis Casson. This letter connecting three key female figures of the London stage is evidence of the strong support network these women formed in a male-dominated arena.

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter from Sybil Thorndike to Elizabeth Robins at Rounton Grange, Northallerton in North Yorkshire. In the letter, Thorndike thanks Robins for sending her a piece of heather from Rounton Grange. Thorndike writes, "I am sure it is going to bring us luck, and I love having something from Rounton on my dressing table. How lovely to think of you up there among the peacocks and the glorious moors! I really think the play is going to be a success." The letter is signed "yours affectionately, Sybil" with a manuscript postscript asking Robins to give her love to Lady Bell, and to thank Lady Bell for her support. The letter is composed on Thorndike's own letterhead stationery, "Miss Sybil Thorndike" at the address of the New Theater, London and listing her husband, Lewis Casson, as Director. The play in production Thorndike refers to is Shelley's The Cenci, in which she played the lead, Beatrice. With stamped, postmarked envelope.

1 result in this collection

Susan Wicklund papers, 1970-2013

8 Linear Feet — 16 boxes
Dr. Susan Wicklund is a former abortion provider from Wisconsin. The papers chiefly document her professional career, centering on her work in the Midwest, where she operated abortion clinics in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and Wisconsin from the 1990s to 2013. Materials include many items of correspondence from patients, supporters, and opponents; files on national and local abortion rights and women's movement groups; articles and newspaper clippings; conference papers; materials related to anti-abortion groups; legal documents, including court case records; a recording of her 1992 "60 Minutes" television interview, and drafts of her book, This Common Secret: My Journey as an Abortion Doctor (2007). A few clinic documents also exist in the form of leasing records, sample charts, manuals, and anonymized guestbooks. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Susan Wicklund papers include personal correspondence and professional papers regarding her work as an abortion provider in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. Materials relate mostly to her work at Mountain Country Women's Clinic in Livingston, Montana in the 1990s, and include newspaper clippings, letters of support, patient reviews, donations, and administrative documents relating to the clinic in the form of sample charts, manuals, and anonymized guestbooks.

Materials relating to Wicklund's 1992 television interview on the "60 Minutes" program include a VHS tape of the interview, clippings, and many letters of support as well as hate mail.

The collection also contains materials related to anti-abortion groups and their harassment of Wicklund; these records also include legal documents referring to a related court case.

Also present in the collection are materials about various women's health organizations, support groups, conferences, and other clinics and centers, including Planned Parenthood, National Women's Organization, and the National Abortion Rights Action League. Drafts of Wicklund's book, This Common Secret: My Journey as an Abortion Doctor (2007) are also in this collection.

1 result in this collection

Susan P. Parrott account book, 1839-1846

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Susan P. Parrott was a widow who probably resided in Maine during the mid-nineteenth century. Collection comprises an handmade account book with paper covers (35 pages, some blank, with an additional 5 leaves excised) maintained by Susan P. Parrott from 1839-1846, mainly to track her payments to at least 30 women she hired to work for her from one day to several months at a time. It is not clear in what capacity she hired the women, although one, Martha Brackett, was a seamstress.

Collection comprises an handmade account book with paper covers (35 pages, some blank, with an additional 5 leaves excised) maintained by Susan P. Parrott from 1839-1846, mainly to track her payments to at least 30 women she hired to work for her from one day to several months at a time. It is not clear in what capacity she hired the women, although one, Martha Brackett, was a seamstress. A few entries are accompanied by notes on the women: Martha White was African American, and on 1842 July 1, Parrott noted that she engaged Bridget(t) O'Boyle "to stay two months from this date--and to behave herself better." Other payments were recorded for tobacco, cider, gin, pills, medicine, bonnets, dresses, corsets, slippers, ribbons and a lace collar, cloth, gloves, crockery, and letters. Parrott also recorded cash entries.

1 result in this collection

Susan Hill papers, 1976-2003 (bulk 1981-1999)

24 Linear Feet — 15,972 Items

Collection consists primarily of newspaper clippings (local, national, and international) pertaining to abortion, the anti-abortion movement, and other women's health issues, kept by staff of the National Women's Health Organization (NWHO) and its regional clinics (WHOs) in Raleigh, N.C.; Columbus, Ga.; Wilmington, Del.; Jackson, Miss.; Fargo, N.D.; Fort Worth, Tex.; Orlando, Fla.; and Milwaukee, Wis. Also contains NWHO legal files, largely pertaining to the NOW (National Organization of Women) v. Scheidler case (1986-2003), and to RICO (the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act), which plaintiffs in the case applied to the anti-abortion movement. Regional WHO clinics were among the plaintiffs for NOW v. Scheidler, and Hill acted as a key witness. The collection also includes a small number of general office/subject files. Arranged into three categories: Clippings, General Office/Subject Files, and Legal Files. The Clippings were received in chronological groupings, and are thus described in more detail than the General Office/Subject Files and Legal Files, which are less organized.

Accessions (2008-0114 and 2009-0110) consist largely of operational and legal files from the NWHO and its regional clinics, including Raleigh, N.C.; Columbus, Ga.; Delaware; Central Florida; Fargo, N.D.; Fort Wayne, Ind.; and Summit (Milwaukee), Wis. Materials include facilities management files; leases and other real estate information; litigation records and lawsuits between NWHO and anti-abortion groups; police and case reports; statutes about abortion procedures; and NWHO board meeting files.

Accession (2010-0019) consists of audiovisual material: 24 VHS tapes plus 2 DVD copies (master and use) of each tape. Contents include news specials relating to NWHO and the abortion debate; also includes testimony footage, interviews, and other NWHO events.

1 result in this collection

Susan B. Anthony letter to Friend Campbell, 1868 September 2

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Collection comprises a letter Susan B. Anthony composed to "Friend Campbell" (Cornelius Bowman Campbell), discussing arrangements for her and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to meet with him and outlining potential discussion of "our political proclivities." Written on letterhead for THE REVOLUTION.

Collection comprises a letter Susan B. Anthony composed to "Friend Campbell" (Cornelius Bowman Campbell), discussing arrangements for her and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to meet with him and outlining potential discussion of "our political proclivities." Written on letterhead for THE REVOLUTION. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Susan B. Anthony letters to Minnie C. Rodey, 1905

0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items
Collection contains two letters Susan B. Anthony wrote on National American Woman Suffrage Association letterhead in February 1905 to Minnie C. Rodey, who was chair of the "Women's Club" in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In the letters, Anthony described informational material she will be sending Rodey, including a history of woman suffrage. In addition, she recommended a process by which the territory would vote on the issue of woman's suffrage before it acquiring statehood, since she considered the legislature and governor more likely to pass it than the general male voters in the state. She added, "... I read yesterday of the number of Indians and Mexicans and negroes that were in the territories. It is amazing that people want to make a state out of a territory composed of a majority of what we should term 'incompetents' Voting should be confined to intelligent beings." She also inquired of mutual friends and recommends her relatives who are visiting Albuquerque.

Collection contains two letters Susan B. Anthony wrote on National American Woman Suffrage Association letterhead in February 1905 to Minnie C. Rodey, who was chair of the "Women's Club" in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In the letters, Anthony described informational material she will be sending Rodey, including a history of woman suffrage. In addition, she recommended a process by which the territory would vote on the issue of woman's suffrage before it acquiring statehood, since she considered the legislature and governor more likely to pass it than the general male voters in the state. She added, "... I read yesterday of the number of Indians and Mexicans and negroes that were in the territories. It is amazing that people want to make a state out of a territory composed of a majority of what we should term 'incompetents' Voting should be confined to intelligent beings." She also inquired of mutual friends and recommends her relatives who are visiting Albuquerque. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Susan B. Anthony collection, 1870-1900

0.1 Linear Feet — 13 items
Collection comprises seven letters from Susan B. Anthony to various correspondents, one postcard written to her, a printed item, and a letter by S. J. S. Holden that mentions Anthony, Stanton, and the 1874 National Woman Suffrage Association (N.W.S.A.) convention.

Collection comprises seven letters from Susan B. Anthony to various correspondents, one postcard written to her, a printed item, and a letter by S. J. S. Holden that mentions Anthony, Stanton, and the 1874 National Woman Suffrage Association (N.W.S.A.) convention. In June 1870, Anthony wrote two letters to Edwin A. Studwell, who became her business manager, regarding payment for lectures in which she participated with Elizabeth Cady Stanton; her need to sell her serial, The Revolution, and plans for its continued success; competition with suffragists in Boston; her life insurance policies; and her general need for ready funds. There is also a Dec. 1873 letter from Anthony to Judge Henry R. Selden requesting copy for his argument made on Anthony's behalf regarding the Rights of Women in the U.S. District Court of New York, to be published in time for the upcoming N.W.S.A. convention. The postscript to this letter was written upon a flyer for a mass meeting of the New York Woman's Suffrage Society. Collection includes a copy of the final, printed version of Selden's argument, "Rights of women under the late constitutional amendments."

In 1894, Anthony wrote two letters to a suffragist concerning problems in Kansas; she wished to identify the Republican, Progressive, or other person responsible for "stirring things up," for the Republicans failed to include suffrage in their platform. On 1900 April 24, Anthony wrote to Rachel [Foster Avery?] regarding several publications in process, including forms for letters to the national conventions of the prohibition, Populist, Democratic, and Republican parties; a "memorial;" an appeal to the Ecumenical Council; along with other work to be shared by the suffrage leadership. A letter from Anthony 1900 July 22 was written to an unnamed suffragist who likely requested an autograph, "Yes indeed--you shall have my pen tracks--not only--but also my wish that you both believe in work for the protection of women in the crowning right of citizenship--the right to vote--and so help to hasten the day when ours shall be a true republic in practice as it now is in theory."

Collection also includes a postcard written to Anthony from Mary L. Lathrop in Jackson, [Miss.?] in 1874 regarding Lathrop's inability to send more money following Anthony's successful speaking engagement there; the money went toward advertising for the event. Another letter, from S. J. S. Holden to Rachel [Foster Avery?], in 1874 describes attendance at the N.W.S.A. convention, the speeches of Anthony and Elizabeth Cay Stanton, and other pastimes in Washington, D.C. Several of the letters in the collection are written on N.W.S.A. or National-American Woman Suffrage Association letterhead; Anthony's 1894 letters are stamped with the ownership mark of the Daughters of the Pioneers of Washington library. Collection includes dealer transcriptions for two of Anthony's letters.

1 result in this collection

Summons, 1785 May 31

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
New York County's Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery was the court of criminal jurisdiction, especially for crimes punishable by life imprisonment or death. Collection comprises a manuscript summons from the Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery in New York City dated 1785 May 31 for Doctor Charles M. McKnight, James J. Beekman, Sarah Conolly (Conoly), and Ann McClean (McClain) to serve as witnesses the following day against the African American prisoner Hannah, who was indicted for "Murder of a Bastard Child."

Collection comprises a manuscript summons from the Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery in New York City dated 1785 May 31 for Doctor Charles M. McKnight, James J. Beekman, Sarah Conolly (Conoly), and Ann McClean (McClain) to serve as witnesses the following day against the African American prisoner Hannah, who was indicted for "Murder of a Bastard Child."

1 result in this collection

Sue Coon papers, 1920-2017

3.0 Linear Feet
Personal papers of longtime Duke administrator Sue Coon documenting her family life and history. Consists chiefly of correspondence, photograph albums, the diary of Jane Dunihue, and the scrapbook of Mary Louise Newburn.

Collection consists chiefly of personal correspondence comprising letters and cards, family photograph albums, the diary of Coon's aunt Jane Dunihue, and the scrapbook of Mary Louise Newburn.

1 result in this collection

Studio Girl Cosmetics Records, bulk circa 1950s-1970s

0.1 Linear Feet
Studio Girl Cosmetics Records include promotional materials related to the multi-level marketing and direct sales cosmetics company. Collection includes leaflets and a pamphlet with beauty tips as well as sales team recruitment materials. Also contains an LP record with the voice of company Chairman Harry Taylor.

The Studio Girl Cosmetics Records include promotional materials related to the Glendale, California-based multi-level marketing and direct sales cosmetics company. This one-folder collection includes two promotional leaflets with beauty tips for customers: “Your Studio Girl Way to Loveliness,” and “Studio Girl: Hollywood Coiffure Blend Hair Fashions of Permalon.” There is also one pamphlet for potential Studio Girl sales representatives called “From a Man’s Point of View.” Other items are recruitment materials including a sales team member application, identification cards, stamped paper bags for products, and branded mailing envelopes. Also contains a plasticized LP record with the voice of company Chairman Harry Taylor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Strong Women Organizing Outrageous Projects records, 1996-2016

3.0 Linear Feet
Strong Women Organizing Outrageous Projects (SWOOP) was a non-profit organization in Raleigh, NC that performed community service projects to help people and organizations in need of home repair and landscaping. The collection includes a series of photo albums and binders documenting SWOOP projects, as well as administrative materials. The binders include correspondence with partner organizations and SWOOP members as well as newsletters and notices about upcoming projects. Board meeting minutes, organizational efforts in the wake of Hurricane Fran, and publicity materials are also included in the collection.

The collection consists of a group of albums and binders that document SWOOP's projects, and a series of materials that document the group's organizational history. The albums contain photographs that document project work days, as well as descriptions of the projects and their locations. The binders contain correspondence with partner organizations and other relevant parties, information about ongoing projects, as well as newsletters and notices about upcoming events and projects. The administrative files comprise mostly board meeting materials, as well as newspaper clippings and publicity.

1 result in this collection

Stone Circles records, 1995-2012

11.4 Linear Feet — 19 boxes
The Stone Circles records contain materials documenting the history of the organization. These include press clippings, board meeting minutes. staff and financial information, program files, newsletters, event information, and correspondence.

Established in 1995, Stone Circles is a leading organization in the national movement toward a more spiritually-based form of activism. SC has introduced thousands of social change leaders and organizations to spiritual and reflective practice through workshops, retreats, trainings and strategic convenings. Stone Circles at the Stone House is located in Mebane, NC on 70 acres of farmland.

1 result in this collection

Southern Feminist, Inc. records, 1975-1990

5.5 Linear Feet
Southern Feminist, Inc. was an organization in Athens, GA from 1984-1989 that served as a communications device for women's political activism in the southern states. Their records consist chiefly of administrative files, which includes correspondence, article drafts, and subscription information. Also included is a group of feminist periodicals including Southern Feminist.

The collection includes the records of the periodical The Southern Feminist, which was founded by editor and publisher Sharron Hannon in Athens.The records of Southern Feminist Inc. chiefly consist of sdministrative files, such as correspondence, drafts of articles, subscription files. Printed materials are mostly feminist peridocals and include issues of The Southern Feminist and The Southern Feminist Extra.

1 result in this collection

Southerners on New Ground records, 1993-2015

17.3 Linear Feet
According to the organization's website, Southerners on New Ground (SONG) is an intersectional activist organization that works to build, connect, and sustain those in the South who believe in liberation across all lines of race, class, culture, gender and sexuality. It was established in 1994 following a National Lesbian and Gay Task Force meeting. SONG is currently headquartered in Atlanta with regional offices across the South. The accession (2009-0098) (9.6 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2004) includes administrative and financial records, programming materials, and organizational files, all stemming from retreats, training, workshops, and community events sponsored or promoted by SONG. The accession also includes SONG materials from the Bayard Rustin project, People of Color activities, Pride at Work, and the Highlander Economy Educational Institute, among others. The accession (2015-0113) (2.9 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2015) was donated by Caitlin Breedlove, Co-Director of SONG from 2006-2015. It includes administrative and financial records, programming information, flyers and promotional materials and research related to campaign initiatives from her time in the SONG leadership.

The accession (2009-0098) (9.6 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2004) includes administrative and financial records, programming materials, and organizational files, all stemming from retreats, training, workshops, and community events sponsored or promoted by SONG. The accession also includes SONG materials from the Bayard Rustin project, People of Color activities, Pride at Work, and the Highlander Economy Educational Institute, among others. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2015-0113) (2.9 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2015) was donated by Caitlin Breedlove, Co-Director of SONG from 2006-2015. It includes administrative and financial records, programming information, flyers and promotional materials and research related to campaign initiatives from her time in the SONG leadership. The accession also contains cards and artwork given to Caitlin by others, assorted photographs from events, two interview recordings, and many of her personal notebooks. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Sophia Foord letter to Robert Adams, 1843 May 8

1 item — 1 folder
Sophia Foord was a 19th century teacher in Massachusetts who was involved with the abolitionist, utopian socialist, and feminist movements. The Sophia Foord letter to Robert Adams mainly concerns the Northampton Association of Education and Industry, a utopian socialist community.

Three-page letter from Sophia Foord of Northampton, MA to Robert Adams of Pawtucket, RI regarding the Northampton Association of Education and Industry. Abolitionists Lydia Maria Child and William Lloyd Garrison are also mentioned, as is the Underground Railroad. A section is missing from the top of the first leaf, affecting text on the second page.

1 result in this collection

Shirley Chisholm presidential campaign position papers, 1972

0.1 Linear Feet — 7 items
Shirley Anita St. Hill Chisholm (1924-2005) was an American politician, educator, and author. On 1972 January 25, she became the first major-party black candidate for President of the United States and the first woman to run for the Democratic presidential nomination. Collection comprises 7 mimeographed position papers Chisholm distributed via her California State Headquarters in Los Angeles to promote her candidacy in the Democratic primary. Topics include foreign aid (paper no. 1, 3 pages), the economy (paper no. 4, 4 pages), justice in America (paper no. 5, 6 pages), equal rights for women (1 page), the busing dilemma (1 page), and the Middle East crisis (2 pages). Includes a statement on welfare reform (2 pages) Chisholm made before the House of Representatives, 1971 June 18.

Collection comprises 7 mimeographed position papers Chisholm distributed via her California State Headquarters in Los Angeles to promote her candidacy in the Democratic primary. Topics include foreign aid (paper no. 1, 3 pages), the economy (paper no. 4, 4 pages), justice in America (paper no. 5, 6 pages), equal rights for women (1 page), the busing dilemma (1 page), and the Middle East crisis (2 pages). Includes a statement on welfare reform (2 pages) Chisholm made before the House of Representatives, 1971 June 18.

1 result in this collection

Sara M. Evans papers, 1959-2005

26.7 Linear Feet — 16,688 items
Sara M. Evans is a Regents Professor Emeritus in the history department at the University of Minnesota. She specializes in American social and women's history of the 20th century. Collection consists of subject files, course materials, research files, publication materials, lectures, correspondence, project documentation, student course work and student activist work accumulated by Evans during her career as first a student, then a professor and historian, of women's history. Topics include feminism, minority women, religion, violence, civil rights, labor activism at Duke University, lesbianism, motherhood, feminist theology, employment, socialist feminism, Christian feminism, National Organization for Women, Organization of American Historians, and student activism. Collection contains materials used in the preparation of her publications, including Personal Politics. There are also lectures, academic correspondence, and administrative materials from her tenure at the University of Minnesota. Audiocassette tapes from a series of interviews conducted by Evans in her research for Personal Politics, as well as a slide show from a feminist organization are also included. Originals of the audio cassette tapes are closed to use. Patrons must request use copies to access the content of this material. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The material in this collection includes subject files, course materials, research files, lectures, conference materials, professional correspondence, publication materials, project documentation, student course work, student activist work, and academic administrative documents. It was accumulated by Evans during her career as first a student, then a professor and historian of women's history. Materials range in date from 1959 through 2005.

Topics in the Subject Files and Course Materials series include feminism, minority women, religion, violence, civil rights, lesbianism, motherhood, employment, and socialist feminism. There are course outlines and syllabi from women's history courses Evans taught at the University of Minnesota dating from the 1970s through the 1990s. There are also materials docmenting student activist work by Evans while at Duke University. It includes petitions, newsletters, and other printed material supporting the activities of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees of the AFL-CIO at Duke University. The Publications series contains materials accumulated by Evans during the research for and the publication of her books. These materials include research notes, publicity, reviews, and illustrations. Most significantly, it includes interview transcripts, chapter notes, and a name index of feminist leaders for Evans' book Personal Politics. The Audiocassettes series contains interviews Evans recorded during her research for Personal Politics. It also contains research interviews Evans conducted in the early 1980s, as well as interviews with Evans. The Lectures series contains notes and transcripts from lectures Evans gave outside the University of Minnesota. The Correspondence, Projects, Feminist Theology, and Miscellany series contains professional correspondence, documentation of grant-funded projects, feminist theology conference materials, and Evans' early course work, including her dissertation and notes from a history class at Duke taught by Anne Firor Scott. Also notable are documentation of the University of Chicago's Vietnam War draft policies, and papers outlining Students for a Democratic Society policies from 1962-1963. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Originals of the audio cassette tapes are closed to use.

1 result in this collection

Sarah Wood Zine collection, 1990s

2 Linear Feet — 150 Items
Sarah Wood was the co-owner of GERLL Press, a zine distro based in Chicago, Ill., in the early to mid-1990s. The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Many of these zines come directly from the GERLL Press inventory, or were submitted to Wood and Curry by their authors to be considered for sale through the distro. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Sarah Orne Jewett letters, 1877 June 15-circa 1890s

0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items
The Sarah Orne Jewett letters consist of two pieces of correspondence written by the author to an editor, Mr. Sawyer, and to Lucy Coffin. Sarah Orne Jewett was a well-known 19th century author whose fiction is set in her native rural Maine. In the first letter, Jewett declines to send Mr. Sawyer anything to print in the first issue of his magazine, as she has been ill and busy, and doesn't want to write something in a hurry, although she wishes him well with his new publication. The second is a condolence letter to Lucy Coffin of Newbury, Massachusetts on the loss of her father. The Coffins were a prominent Massachusetts family.

Collection consists of two autograph manuscript letters written by Sarah Orne Jewett. The first is addressed to a Mr. Sawyer, the editor of a new journal, declining to send him anything to print in his first issue, as she has been ill and doesn't wish to write something in a hurry. She sends him "hearty good wishes for the success of his magazine," asks him to send her a prospectus, and "suppose[s] that, like all editors, you have more verses than you wish to print." The letter is on a single sheet of folded paper with writing on three pages dated 1877 June 15 and written from South Berwick, [Maine]. The second letter is a sympathy note written on mourning stationery and addressed to Miss [Lucy] Coffin dated 26 December, but lacking a year. A Boston address appears at the top. Jewett expresses sympathy for the loss of Miss Coffin's father from both her and her companion Mrs. Field, and reminisces about a day they had spent together in Newburyport. Jewett references John Greenleaf Whittier, who was a student of Lucy's cousin Joseph while at Dartmouth College. The Coffin Family was prominent in New England and lived in Newbury, Massachusetts for many generations.

1 result in this collection

Sarah Maitland Zine collection, 1997-2009

4 Linear Feet — 500 Items
Virginia-based writer Sarah Maitland began producing zines around 2001 and ran a zine distro for about three years. She was a founder of the Richmond Zine Fest which started in 2007. Approximately 220 titles from Sarah Maitland's personal zine collection, most dating between 1998 and 2008 and discussing a wide range of subjects. Also contains some material from Maitland's personal projects, as well as buttons, cassettes, stickers, and other ephemera.

This collection contains approximately 220 titles (some with multiple issues) from Sarah Maitland's personal zine collection, most dating between 1998 and 2008. The zines are largely about women, feminism, sexuality, and personal stories; specific subjects include feminism, sexual assault, political activism, parenting, vegan recipes, racism, bisexuality, pop culture, television shows, love, sex, mental disorders, higher education, sizism, punk rock, sex dichotomy, transgender issues, and media. Also contains some material from Maitland's personal projects, such as promotional materials from the Richmond Zine Fest, as well as buttons, cassettes, stickers, and other ephemera.

1 result in this collection

Sarah J. Hale letter to Mathew Carey, 1823 March 9

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Collection comprises a letter from the 19th century writer and editor Sarah J. Hale to the prominent Philadelphia publisher Mathew Carey thanking him for his contribution to Hale's charity benefiting Boston seamen.

The collection consists of a single signed autograph letter with text on one side from Sarah J. Hale to the Philadelphia publisher Mathew Carey. Hale thanks Carey for his subscription to her charity, the Seaman's Aid Society and Mariner's House of Boston for the year 1822-1823. Hale also inquires about local interest in a Philadelphia organization that teaches needlework as a means of economic empowerment to poor women.

1 result in this collection

Sarah J. Ewing diary, 1868 December 17-1869 July 17

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Collection comprises a diary (49 pages) Sarah Ewing maintained in ink, focusing on the domestic abuse she suffered from her husband, including verbal and physical abuse. One entry also records her husband's arrest for an assault that took place outside the home. By the end of the diary, Sarah has left her husband in fear for her safety, taking with her the baby. After visiting the house in order to retrieve more clothing, she ends the diary with a note that she is not a thief, "I had never in my life before removed or taken away from H.H. [Haydon House] any articles of clothing or jewelry of any sort." Marginal notes made by an unidentified writer in pencil indicate that the diary may have been used in legal or other proceedings on her behalf.
1 result in this collection

Sarah Grand autograph statement and letter, 1898?-1908

0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items
Sara Grand was a pseudonym for author and feminist Frances Elizabeth Bellenden Clarke (1854-1943), of Great Britain. Includes a signed statement and a letter, both written from Tunbridge Wells.

Includes a signed statement and a letter, both written from Tunbridge Wells. In the statement (approximately 1898), Grand notes that it is in the condition of the hope and lives of the masses that sets the tone for a nation. She calls on all right-thinking people in power to work for the elevation of the masses and a universal federation that will make patriotism obsolete. The letter (1908) to writer Miss [Matilda] Betham-Edwards includes descriptions of Grand's recent activities, and notes that she is enclosing an almanac and a card. Includes an attempted transcription of the letter.

1 result in this collection

Sarah E. Goodwin needlework patterns, circa 1865-1898 and undated

0.4 Linear Feet — Approx. 300 Items
Resident of South Berwick, Maine. The centerpiece of this collection is a late 19th century scrapbook belonging to Sarah E. Goodwin of Maine, into which manuscript and printed instructions and patterns for the creation of tapestries, collars, edging, capes, mittens, afghans, hoods, curtains, infant shoes, slippers, and other items were pasted and pinned. Collection also includes a commonplace book of knitting and crocheting patterns, home remedies for illnesses and diseases, and a variety of household tips, as well as poems, literary quotations, and miscellaneous lists of information; as well as a catalog for a Baptist church in South Berwick, Maine (1898), numerous patterns for embroidered monograms, and many loose patterns. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The centerpiece of this collection is a late 19th century scrapbook belonging to Sarah E. Goodwin of Berwick, Maine, into which manuscript and printed instructions and patterns for the creation of tapestries, collars, edging, capes, mittens, afghans, hoods, curtains, infant shoes, slippers, and other items were pasted and pinned. Patterns for knitting, crocheting, quilting, embroidery, tatting, and other types of handwork are included. Collection also includes a commonplace book of knitting and crocheting patterns, which also contains home remedies for illnesses and diseases, and a variety of household tips, as well as poems, literary quotations, and miscellaneous lists of information. Other items in the collection include a catalogue for a Baptist church in South Berwick, Maine (1898), numerous patterns for embroidered monograms, and many loose patterns.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Sarah Dyer Zine collection, 1985-2005

18.3 Linear Feet — 2050 Items
Approximately 2000 individual zines and nearly 800 titles, most self-published by women and girls 1985-2000. Most were produced in the United States, a few come from Canada and other countries. In-house database with subject access available. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, sexual abuse, music, mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, and erotica. The collection includes four audiocassette tapes and one VHS tape. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition #1 (2002-0319) contains approximately 150 titles.

Addition #2 (2006-0068) contains approximately 150 titles and are separated into two groups: those authored by women and those authored by men.

Addition #3 (2008-0030) contains approximately 175 titles and one VHS tape.

1 result in this collection

Sarah Brown Capron letter, 1865 December 26, December 28.

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Sarah Brown Capron was born in Lanesboro, Massachusetts, in 1828, the daughter of Henry Brown Hooker and Martha (Chickering) Hooker. The family subsequently moved to Falmouth, Massachusetts. Sarah graduated from Wheaton Seminary, and married William Capron on October 1, 1856. Over the course of their marriage, the Caprons had 3 children. On November 24, 1856, the Caprons sailed to Ceylon, India, as missionaries of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Mission. Arriving in Madras in March of 1857, they labored in Tirupuvanum and Mana Madura for the next sixteen years. Collection comprises a copy of a letter (10 pages) written by Sarah B. Capron in Mana Madura, India, to unidentified recipients on 1865 December 26 and 28.

Collection comprises a copy of a letter (10 pages) written by Sarah B. Capron in Mana Madura, India, to unidentified recipients on 1865 December 26 and 28. Sarah was in southern India, with her two daughters, practicing medicine and treating residents of the town, although her medical training was minimal. She stated that "more knowledge of medical services would save me a vast amount of care.... when I go to America, I must have some Hospital experience & practice, somehow" (page 1). She then narrated a typical day for her, telling of the various patients she treated, including a man with stomach pain, a woman with knee pain, a young boy who was gored by a cow, a man with ear discharge, a woman with eye pain, children with dysentery, a beggar with sores, and an infant with lung congestion.

1 result in this collection

Sarabande Books records, 1992-2020

120 Linear Feet
Sarabande Books is a non-profit literary press publishing poetry and fiction. The Sarabande Books records include materials documenting the founding of the company as well as yearly publishing materials.

This collection (accession #2000-0306) (4150 items, dated 1992-1996) documents the founding of the company. Many files mention editor and president Sarah Gorham and include start-up files, correspondence and author files, marketing materials, financial records, and other materials generated by the press. Also includes Gorham's memoir written during the first days of the press; files on prizes offered by the press (the Mary McCarthy Prize for short fiction and the Kathryn A. Morthon Prize for poetry); correspondence with authors Jane Mead, Lee Martin, Richard Frost, Sharon Bryan, Laura Jenson, Medbh McGuckian, and Liliana Ursu; and correspondence with Sallie Bingham about the formation of the press. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2001-0022) (2911 items, 4.4 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) continues to document the company's activities. Materials include correspondence files; author files; sales and marketing files; 24 color and 4 black-and-white photographs; 11 electronic (computer) files; and material relating to Sarabande's non-profit operations from 1996 to 1997. Much of the correspondence tracks letters to and from Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham. Authors represented include Dick Allen, Brian Griffin, Sharon Solwitz, Belle Waring, and Baron Wormser.

Addition (2002-0062) (2260 items, 6.3 linear feet; dated 1996-1998) comprises primarily author binders, files, and correspondence (1996-1998); and marketing and sales records, including examples of advertisements and reviews (1998). Also includes correspondence between Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham (1998); poetry and fiction galleys; documents related to the press' nonprofit activities, including 2 audio cassette tapes and paper records documenting board meetings (1998); 2 color and 10 black-and-white photographs and 1 black-and-white negative; and 18 electronic (computer) files originally received on one 3.5" diskette. Authors represented include Cathleen Hagenston, James Kimbrell, Stefanie Marlis, Shara McCallum, Jean Valentine, and Kate Walbert.

Addition (2003-0021) (2,300 items, 5.30 linear feet; dated 1995-2002) consists largely of author files (1997-2000) and printed material comprising journals and review publications (1998-1999). Also includes office correspondence (1995-2002); sales analyses, grant proposals, and marketing files (1996-2001); and documents related to conferences and events, special projects, board meetings, and nonprofit activities.

Addition (2004-0018) (4000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2001) includes author binders and files, correspondence, financial and marketing archives, and manuscript galleys. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2005-0019) (3695 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2001) primarily comprises authors' binders, including incoming and outgoing correspondence, as well as typescript drafts and galleys. Also includes reviews, press releases, and advertisements; notes from sales conferences and board meetings; consortium sales analyses; a non-profit activity file; and organizational materials for Sarabande-in-Education, a website program for college students and teachers. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2006-0025) (3,750 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2002) comprises correspondence, drafts, galleys, marketing and biographical files, contracts, press releases, and book reviews. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2007-0041) (6,000 items, 9.2 lin. ft.; dated 1996-2003) contains autographed books, authors' files, manuscripts, the contents of author binders, marketing files, board meeting files, nonprofit activitiy files, Lila Wallace materials, sales kits, a Writer's Almanac CD, and a Sallie Bingham rehearsal tape for Short Fiction Series.

Addition (2008-0028) (4,500 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains author files, correspondence, marketing files and galleys for books published in 2004-2005. Also included are 2 CDR's of the Writer's Almanac.

Addition (2009-0092) (8325 items; 11.1 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2009) includes administrative files, book reviews, press releases, author files and correspondence, and manuscripts and drafts from authors published by Sarabande.

Addition (2010-0028) (9000 items; 12.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2010) includes administrative files, Sarabande correspondence with authors, author files, poetry and fiction finalists, and various book reviews and advertisements.

Addition (2011-0076) (6750 items; 9.0 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2011) includes materials from conferences, non-profit activities, grants, correspondence, marketing, staffing, finances, and author files.

Addition (2012-0046) (3188 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2011) includes correspondence, publicity files, author files, and manuscripts.

Addition (2013-0158) (5625 items; 7.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2012) includes author files, reviews, manuscripts, author correspondence and administrative materials.

Addition (2015-0150) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2014) includes administrative materials and author correspondence, foundation research and correspondence, and author files.

Addition (2015-0151) (2250 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2009-2015) includes administrative files, author files and author binders.

Addition (2016-0311) (3.0 lin. ft; dated 2011-2016) consists chiefly of author files. Also contains files related to prizes and awards.

Addition (2018-0011) (4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2016-2018) consists of publicity and author files that contain drafts of recently published works.

Addition (2019-0093) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2015-2017) consists of author files, including Sallie Bingham's publishing agreement and drafts of works.

Addition 2021-0075 (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2019-2020) includes author files for books published in 2019 and 2020, Sarabande Writing Labs brochure, 2019 and 2020 catalogs, press releases and reviews for 2019 and 2020 books, and annual reports.

1 result in this collection

Saltar family correspondence, 1759-1880 and undated

0.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes
Over 200 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over a third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, her daughters Lucy Saltar and Frances "Fanny" Saltar, and Elizabeth's cousins Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon. Dozens of other letters come from family friends and relatives, male and female, from prominent families in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, New York, and some from the Midwest and New England states. Topics include courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and some discussions of finances. There are a few references to slavery and to enslaved people and servants. Letters sent during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863; one discusses African American troops and their role in the war, and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman. A few earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially in and around Baltimore and Philadelphia. Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The papers consist almost entirely of 266 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over one-third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, the family matriarch, Lucy Saltar, Frances "Fanny" Saltar, Mary Gordon, and Polly Gordon. There are also single letters from other female members of the Saltar family and a handful of letters from men, some of whom were Saltar family members. The letters are organized by correspondent name, ending with a group of letters addressed to unidentified individuals.

The manuscript pages total approximately 765, primarily bifolios, almost all written in ink. There are also four additional manuscripts: an invitation; a sheet of paper with receipts; and a memorandum and bond concerning a land sale. A number of later letters are accompanied by addressed envelopes, some with stamps.

The correspondence is almost entirely comprised of women writing to other women: mothers to daughters; daughters to mothers; and cousins to cousins; and friends to each other. Over half of the collection comprises letters to and from a family matriarch, Elizabeth Gordon Saltar, living at her residence at Magnolia Grove (near Frankford, Pa.), and a large group of letters sent by various correspondents to her daughter Fanny Saltar, who was one of the family's historians. Also present is a large group of correspondence between cousins Elizabeth Gordon Saltar and Mary Gordon, as well as letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's other daughter Lucy Saltar, and letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's cousins, Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon.

Other families who correspond and/or are mentioned often in the letters: Bowne, Brooks, Bunyan, Coleman, Drexel, Hartshorne, Howell, Lardner, McMurtrie, Morgan, Morris, Stillman, Tilghman, Ulstick, Van Dykes, and Wharton. Many of these are prominent families from Pennsylvania or Maryland. One letter from a Bowne in series 7 contains a partial family tree of the Bownes and Saltar families. Most of these letters are found in the Fanny Saltar series.

Among the places from which letters were sent are areas in Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York State, New Jersey, Illinois, Ohio, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Paris (France), and Rome (Italy). Cities represented are Boston, Baltimore, Charleston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, and others. Many letters were sent to or from Magnolia Grove, the Saltar plantation home near Philadelphia.

Topics tend to focus on societal mores and customs of the times as experienced by married and single women of land-owning classes: courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses such as measles, bowel complaints, eye conditions, diphtheria, tumors, and mental illness, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and fairly frequent mentions of finances.

The letters written during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863, as well as a comment on friends going off to war, and one letter discusses African American troops and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman, whom the Saltars knew from Philadelphia. Earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially of events around Baltimore.

Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Sally Tatnall papers, 1953-2016 and undated

13.5 Linear Feet
Sally Tatnall is a self-described radical feminist and community and political activist from Cleveland Heights, Ohio. Her work centers on lesbian rights, feminism, women's spirituality, reproductive health, anti-racism, and back-to-the-land projects. The collection includes personal materials such as journals, correspondence and photographs, as well as documentation of Tatnall's activism, and printed materials including 1970s sex education pamphlets.

The collection consists of journals, correspondence, meeting minutes, clippings, workshop materials, conference materials, research, and printed materials. Materials document lesbian feminist activism in Cleveland, Ohio, including marches, demonstrations, a feminist Land Project, Restore Cleveland Hope, an art project based on Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party, and the Radical Thought Conference. Printed materials include What She Wants: Cleveland's Monthly Feminist and Lesbian newspaper, 1970s sex education pamphlets, and a group of zines made by high school students in response to Tatnall's work.

1 result in this collection

Sallie Bingham collection of Lefroy, Caperton, and Montague family papers, 1866-1959 and undated

0.8 Linear Feet
Family papers documenting the Lefroy, Caperton, and Montague familes, representing the families in Sallie Bingham's matrilineal line. These materials belonged to Sallie Bingham's mother, Mary Caperton Bingham, until her death, when they went to Sallie; her sister, Eleanor Bingham Miller; and their niece, Emily Bingham. Two figures documented in these papers, Helena Lefroy Caperton and Sallie Montague Lefroy, are the focus, along with her mother, of Sallie Bingham’s 2014 book, The Blue Box. Includes genealogies, letters, wills, a bill of sale, short stories and other writing, speeches, a prayer book, list, a few clippings, and Irish and English postcards.

Family papers documenting the Lefroy, Caperton, and Montague familes, representing the families in Sallie Bingham's matrilineal line. These materials belonged to Sallie Bingham's mother, Mary Caperton Bingham, until her death, when they went to Sallie; her sister, Eleanor Bingham Miller; and their niece, Emily Bingham. Two figures documented in these papers, Helena Lefroy Caperton and Sallie Montague Lefroy, are the focus, along with her mother, of Sallie Bingham’s 2014 book, The Blue Box. Includes genealogies, letters, wills, a bill of sale, short stories and other writing, speeches, a prayer book, list, a few clippings, and Irish and English postcards. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Ruth W. Morgan collection of Oxford N.C. Women's Conference records, 1999-2004

0.6 Linear Feet — 126 Items
Ruth "Peach Pie" Webb Morgan is an African American native of Granville County, North Carolina. The collection contains material collected by Morgan from the church-related "Women's Conference" held at the Oxford Public Works Complex in Oxford, North Carolina in 1999, 2001, 2002, and 2004. Items include handouts, photographs, meeting agendas, and notebooks. The materials offer insights into the status and relationships of African American women in North Carolina, and their church-related affiliations and activities. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection contains material collected by Ruth Webb Morgan from the church-related "Women's Conference" held at the Oxford Public Works Complex in Oxford, North Carolina in 1999, 2001, 2002, and 2004. Items include handouts, photographs, meeting agendas, and notebooks. The materials offer insights into the status and relationships of African American women in North Carolina, and their church-related affiliations and activities.

The cookbooks originally in this collection have been cataloged separately for the Rubenstein Library collections. They may be located by performing a title search for the following items: FAVORITE RECIPES, FAVORITE RECIPES FROM THE FARMERS' ALMANAC, COUNTRY COOKIN' RECIPES, THE SENSATIONAL NIGHTINGALES COOKBOOK, ROYAL QUEEN COOKWARE TREASURY OF COOKING.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Ruth Finlay papers, 1960-2011, bulk 1969-2011

6.8 Linear Feet — 300 Items

The first accession of the collection comprises diaries (39 volumes) written by Ruth Finlay documenting the details of and her emotional reactions to her daily life, activities, behavior, social life, and family life between 1960 and 1994. Topics include her hospitalization, ongoing treatment for, and life following cancer (1985 and onward); her relationships with her husband, children, and grandchildren; and the death of an adult son (December 1988).

The second accession (2006-0030) comprises diaries written by Finlay between January 1995 and August 2004.

The third accession (2011-0191) comprises 12 diaries written by Finlay between September 2004 and July 2010, a wedding log book, two day minders, correspondence, and family photographs.

All accessions acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Rose Pastor Stokes letter to Benjamin Butler Davenport, 1914 August 6

0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items
Collection comprises a letter Stokes wrote to dramatist Benjamin Butler Davenport regarding her plan to attend his play "The Silent Assertion" with her husband. Includes enclosure.
1 result in this collection

Reproductive Rights National Network records, 1970-1982

0.2 Linear Feet — 200 items
The Reproductive Rights National Network formed in 1978 in response to the nationwide abortion debate launched by Roe v. Wade. It eventually included about 50 feminist organizations and devoted itself to making reproductive choices available for all women. R2N2 campaigned for safe abortions; for the right of gay couples to adopt and raise children; and against the sterilization of poor or unfit mothers. It disbanded in 1984. Collection includes an International Planned Parenthood Federation report (Spring 1970); Reproductive Rights National Network newsletters and other coverage of the abortion debate; and administrative materials from the operations of the R2N2, including proposed platforms and policies, clippings and testimonials, and other miscellaneous notes and material. Subjects include abortion rights and protests; birth control; women's sterilization, particularly of Hispanic women; and gay and lesbian rights. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes an International Planned Parenthood Federation report (Spring 1970); a Reproductive Rights National Network newsletters; publicity and pamphlets from the abortion debate; and administrative materials from the operations of the R2N2, including proposed platforms and policies, clippings and testimonials, and other miscellaneous notes and materials. Subjects include abortion rights and protests; women's sterilization, particularly of Hispanic women; and gay and lesbian rights. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Reproductive Health Ephemera Collection, 1910s-2009 and undated

0.5 Linear Feet
The Reproductive Health Ephemera Collection consists of pamphlets, flyers, brochures, booklets, bumper stickers and other items that document the work of organizations concerned with women's reproductive health and reproductive rights. Collections contains items from both pro-choice and pro-life organizations. Also includes advertisements and information about products related to birth control and to ideas of vaginal hygiene (such as diaphragms, suppositories, and douching products).

The Reproductive Health Ephemera Collection includes pamphlets, newsletters, flyers, booklets, bumper stickers, and other miscellany from a range of organizations and events related to abortion rights, sexual health, and reproductive health care. Collection contains items from both pro-choice and pro-life organizations. Also includes advertisements and information about products related to birth control and to ideas of vaginal hygiene (such as diaphragms, suppositories, and douching products).

1 result in this collection

Renee Chelian Papers, 1981-1995

6 Linear Feet — 5 boxes
Renee Chelian founded the Northland Family Planning Center, a women's healthcare and abortion clinic in the Detroit area. The Renee Chelian papers include professional papers related to the Northland Family Planning Center, including materials related to anti-abortion groups picketing the clinic, as well as materials related to Chelian's involvement with national women's healthcare organizations.

The Renee Chelian papers include professional papers related to Chelian's clinic, Northland Family Planning in Detroit, Michigan, and her work with national organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Organization for Women. Materials relate mostly to her work at the Northland Family Planning clinic during the 1990s and include newspaper clippings, photographs, pro-choice and anti-abortion materials, completed surveys from patients, family, and friends who visited the clincs, and administrative documents related to escort training, office supplies, and staff information.

The collection also contains materials, such as hate mail and pamphlets, related to anti-abortion groups and their picketing of the Northland Family clinic. Folders titled Saturday contain photographs of the picketors and picketing information of the anti-abortion protesting at the clinic. Materials also relate to other anti-abortion materials, including papers related to the harassment of other abortion providers and the murder of Dr. David Gunn, and anti-clinic organizations such as Operation Rescue, Life Dynamics, Prolife Action League, Feminists for Life, crisis pregnancy centers and leaders such as Randall Terry and Joe Scheidler.

Also included are materials from other women's health organizations and campaigns, including Stand Up For Women, Project Choice, and Operation Rescue. Some of the anti-abortion materials contain explicit images.

1 result in this collection

Rebecca West note, 16 August 1931

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item — 12.5 x 16.5
Rebecca West was a British writer and critic. The Rebecca West note consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown correspondent reading, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

The collection consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown recipient which reads, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

1 result in this collection

Photographs of women's college production of a Sanskrit drama, circa 1905

0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 62 images on 14 card mounts
Set of 62 captioned black-and-white photographic prints mounted on 14 cardstock boards, documenting an elaborate stage production of a well-known, classical Sanskrit drama, the S´akuntala¯. The play was probably produced at the Northfield Seminary for Young Ladies in Northfield, Massachusetts around 1905, at a time when Indian dramas were popularized and produced by many women's colleges. The photographs are mounted on the front and back of cardstock mounts, and portray individual young female actors playing male and female roles, as well as tableaus with groups of actors. The images vividly capture the actors' expressions and gestures and portray detailed Oriental costumes and props. Most of the handwritten ink captions name the characters depicted, and many also list quotes from the particular act or scene. One image features a scenic view of Northfield Seminary from across the Connecticut River. The images range in size from range in size from 5.5 x 3.75 to 8 x 13.75 inches, with the mounts measuring 9x14 inches. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Set of 62 mounted and captioned black-and-white photographic prints documenting an elaborate stage production of a well-known, classical Sanskrit drama, the S´akuntala¯; the play was probably produced at the Northfield Seminary for Young Ladies in Northfield, Massachusetts around 1905. The photographs are mounted on the front and back of 14 heavy card stock boards. The images range in size from range in size from 5.5 x 3.75" to 8 x 13.75", with the mounts measuring 9x14" with one exception measuring 10x16. There are a few near-duplicates among the images.

The images feature portraits of costumed female actors playing male and female roles, as well as groups of actors and several long shots of the stage, in which the curtains, scenery, and part of an orchestra pit can also be seen. The images vividly capture the actors' expressions and gestures, and portray detailed Oriental costumes and props (these argue against it being Smith College's 1904 production, as it was reported as using Americanized costumes and music). Most of the handwritten ink captions name the characters depicted, and many also list quotes from the particular act or scene. One image features a scenic view of Northfield Seminary from across the Connecticut River, with small white tents visible on the lawns to the left; the play may have been produced at Northfield during a summer conference. One of the school's alumna, Ruth St. Denis, was an important modern dancer who popularized Oriental dances and dramas; she appeared in Sakuntala in 1905, perhaps giving the impetus to a staging of the play at Northfield Seminary.

The card stock mounts, with their associated images, are arranged in their original order based on the negative numbers visible in each still image: 1-31, 33-38, and 40-62, with numbers 32, 39, and 59 absent. The view of the campus is unnumbered.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

1 result in this collection

Paula Kamen papers, 1970-2006 and undated, bulk 1991-2002

57 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items
Paula Kamen was born in Chicago and grew up in Flossmoor, Illinois. She received a bachelor's degree in journalism in 1989 from the University of Illinois. Kamen is a Chicago-based (current as of 2007) journalist, playwright, and the author of a number of books, including one of the first books to describe the third wave of feminism. Articles and book reviews by Kamen have been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, Ms., Chicago Tribune, among others, and more than a dozen anthologies. Kamen is also a frequent public speaker and has appeared at over 70 universities. A focus of the collection, which spans the years 1971-2006, is on Generation X women, feminism, and sexuality. Contains a Writings Series which includes research files, drafts, and publicity-related files for all of Kamen's major works as of 2006, as well as drafts of and materials related to articles and other shorter pieces written by Kamen. Works represented are the nonfiction books All In My Head: An Epic Quest to Cure an Unrelenting, Totally Unreasonable, and Only Slightly Enlightening Headache, Feminist Fatale: Voices from the Twentysomething Generation Explore the Future of the Women's Movement, Her Way: Young Women Remake the Sexual Revolution, and the plays Jane: Abortion and the Underground and Seven Dates with Seven Writers. Other series in the collection are Conferences and Engagements, with files relating to Kamen's frequent speaking engagements, particularly at universities; Subject Files, an extensive array of clippings and articles maintained by Kamen on a wide range of feminist subjects primarily in the 1990s; Audiovisual Materials, and Printed Materials.

The Paula Kamen Papers span the years 1970-2006, with the bulk of the material dating from 1991 to 2002. The collection documents Kamen's career as a writer and journalist. Specific topics covered by Kamen and addressed in the collection are Generation X women, feminism, and sexuality, abortion, popular culture, and chronic pain. The collection is organized into five series: Writings, Conferences and Engagements, Subject Files, Audiovisual Materials, and Printed Materials.

The Writings Series includes research files, drafts, and publicity-related files for all of Kamen's major works as of 2006, as well as drafts of and materials related to articles and other shorter pieces written by Kamen. The Other Files subseries primarily includes correspondence related to the publishing of Kamen's writings, and also contains pieces in which Kamen is cited. Works represented in the Writings Series are the nonfiction books All In My Head: An Epic Quest to Cure an Unrelenting, Totally Unreasonable, and Only Slightly Enlightening Headache, Feminist Fatale: Voices from the "Twentysomething" Generation Explore the Future of the "Women's Movement," Her Way: Young Women Remake the Sexual Revolution, and the plays Jane: Abortion and the Underground and Seven Dates with Seven Writers.

Materials in the Conferences and Engagements Series document Kamen's frequent speaking engagements at college and university campuses, bookstores, and conferences throughout the 1990s. A significant number of these talks were in support of her books Feminist Fatale and Her Way.

The Subject Files Series contains files maintained by Kamen on a wide range of subjects pertaining to her writing interests. Topics covered in this series include feminism, activism, politics, popular culture, and sex, along with many others. These files consist primarily of clippings from magazines, newspapers, and other publications.

The Audiovisual Materials Series contains audio cassettes, micro cassettes, compact discs, videotapes, and photographs. A majority of these materials are recordings of interviews conducted by Kamen during the course of researching her books and articles. Other recordings are from conferences attended by Kamen, a production of Kamen's play, Seven Dates with Seven Writers, and copies of television programs which included appearances by Kamen. Photographic material consists of photographs taken at the 1993 March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights and at an undated production of Kamen's play, Seven Dates with Seven Writers.

Items in the Printed Materials Series consist of 20 issues of the magazines Deneuve and Curve. Other magazines and a number of zines are filed separately, with the Bingham Center's Women's, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Movements Periodical Collection, and with the Bingham Center's Women's Zine Collection, respectively. A complete list of these titles may be found in the Items Separated section of this document.

1 result in this collection

Parker Pillsbury diaries, 1864-1896

2 Linear Feet — 33 pocket diaries
Parker Pillsbury (1809–1898) was an American minister, lecturer, newspaper editor, and advocate for abolition and women's rights. The collection is composed of 33 pocket diaries Parker Pillsbury kept for the years 1864 to 1896. The diaries offer a consistent, uninterrupted record of Pillsbury's life during these years, particularly his work fighting for the rights of women and African Americans and promoting Free Religion. Pillsbury records his interactions with leading social reformers of the nineteenth century, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Abby Kelley and Stephen S. Foster, Gerrit Smith, Wendell Phillips, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott, Robert Ingersoll, Charles Sumner, Henry Ward Beecher and Theodore Tilton among many others. His entries occasionally are accompanied by tipped in newspaper clippings about national events.

The collection is composed of 33 pocket diaries Parker Pillsbury kept for the years 1864 to 1896. The diaries contain a consistent, uninterrupted record of Pillsbury's life during these years.

Pillsbury wrote daily or nearly daily about the details of his life recording both the mundane and the profound. A typical entry begins with the weather and his location before providing the names of those with whom he met or correspondeded that day, events he attended, lectures he gave, or work he did. Pillsbury writes about his interactions with William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Abby Kelley and Stephen S. Foster, Gerrit Smith, Wendell Phillips, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott, the Allcott family, Robert Ingersoll, Charles Sumner, Henry Ward Beecher, Theodore Tilton and many other leading social reformers of the nineteenth century. His entries are occasionally accompanied by tipped in newspaper clippings about national events.

Due to their consistency and span, the diaries provide a decades' long chronology of Pillsbury's involvement with and importance in the major social reform movements of the late nineteenth century, and in particular, the women's rights movement with which he closely associated during these years. The diaries show him to be a ceaseless traveler, moving up and down the east coast, throughout New England, and through western New York and the Midwest, as he lectured, preached, attended women's suffrage conventions, and otherwise attempted to advance the causes of equal rights for women and African Americans and Free Religion.

The diaries illustrate his close and sustained relationship with major figures in the women's rights movements. He writes of his work as joint editor with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony of the Revolution from 1867 to 1870, and his continued friendship and partnership with Anthony in the following decades. He often visited her in Rochester, they lectured together, and he served as her advisor when she was put on trial in Albany by the State Supreme Court for voting without the right to do so.

1 result in this collection

OutRight records, 1983-1995

5.25 Linear Feet
OutRight is a Triangle-area organization that was founded in 1990 and is now disbanded. OutRight provided support for gay youth and other young people with questions about their sexual orientation. The OutRight records consist of meeting minutes, correspondence, financial records, resources and programs (including clippings, flyers, and pamphlets), and literature on AIDS and sexuality. The materials also include reports on nationwide trends and LGBTQ issues.

The OutRight Records chiefly consist of minutes from meetings, correspondence, financial records, publicity (including clippings, flyers, and pamphlets), and literature on AIDS and sexuality. Also included are reports on nationwide trends and LGBTQ issues, the organization's by-laws, fundraising, correspondence, program planning, and administrative information.

1 result in this collection

Olive Company publicity and order form for the National Bust Developer, 1915-1920 and undated

0.1 Linear Feet
The Olive Company was based in Clarinda, Ia. Collection comprises printed material supporting the purchase of the National Bust Developer, a vacuum appliance. Includes an advertising pamphlet (15 pgs.) for "perfect bust development," an order blank, and a sheet of endorsements. The advertising pamphlet explains flat-chestedness as follows: "In the natural order of things, maternity would have occurred early enough to prevent the loss of the busts. The development of the busts is greatly dependent upon the maternal instincts. The tendency of the day is to postpone marriage much beyond the age demanded by Nature. Hence it is that there are a multitude of women who are well developed in all other respects, but find to their chagrin that the busts are gradually disappearing." (p. 6)

Collection comprises printed material supporting the purchase of the National Bust Developer, a vacuum appliance. Includes an advertising pamphlet (15 pgs.) for "perfect bust development," an order blank, and a sheet of endorsements. The advertising pamphlet explains flat-chestedness as follows: "In the natural order of things, maternity would have occurred early enough to prevent the loss of the busts. The development of the busts is greatly dependent upon the maternal instincts. The tendency of the day is to postpone marriage much beyond the age demanded by Nature. Hence it is that there are a multitude of women who are well developed in all other respects, but find to their chagrin that the busts are gradually disappearing." (p. 6)

1 result in this collection

Noyes-Balch family papers, 1854-1957 and undated

1.6 Linear Feet — 4 boxes
The Noyes and Balch families resided primarily in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone. The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. There is a photograph album containing 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are also loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. She described the challenges of her teaching situation, social events and celebrations, local attitudes about freed blacks and her teaching them, black funeral and religious practices, and general conditions on the islands. She included her hand-drawn maps of the area, indicating its relation to the mainland. In addition to these letters from the Sea Islands, there are letters Catharine wrote while she was in Illinois and at the family home in Jamaica Plain, Mass., before she made her trip South (1854-1863). There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone.

The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. Common topics in all the letters include family news, health matters, visiting, travel plans, reading, lectures and church services attendance, theater performances, and pastimes. The photograph album contains 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are 31 cartes-de-visite and one tintype; two of the cartes-de-visite have been hand-painted. The majority of the photographs are labeled, several in ink in a later hand. In addition to the photograph album, there are 17 loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957, including 4 cartes-de-visite, 6 tintypes, and 2 photo postcards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

NOW products order form, circa 1992

1 Linear Foot
The National Organization for Women (NOW) is a feminist activist organization founded in 1966. Collection comprises one product order form on newsprint, offering feminist and activist-themed items (books, buttons, t-shirts, jewelry, stickers, etc.) available for sale from the National Organization for Women office in Washington, D.C.

Collection comprises one product order form on newsprint, offering feminist and activist-themed items (books, buttons, t-shirts, jewelry, stickers, etc.) available for sale from the National Organization for Women office in Washington, D.C.

1 result in this collection

Norma Taylor Mitchell papers, circa 1930s-2020

49.5 Linear Feet
Norma Taylor Mitchell was an American History professor at Troy University in Alabama and a lay leader in the United Methodist Church. These materials document her research and teaching career, as well as her church leadership.

The collection contains material documenting Mitchell's dissertation research on the Virginia politician David Campbell (1779-1859). Boxes 2-5 consist entirely of information on loose index cards. These materials also document Mitchell's research on the enslaved women who lived on Campbell's estate in Abington, VA. The collection also contains materials related to Mitchell's research on the Alabama physician Louise Branscomb. There are materials documenting Mitchell's professional activities and teaching career at what was then known as Troy State University. Mitchell's extensive service work in the Methodist Church at the local, regional, and national levels is also documented.

1 result in this collection

Niku Arbabi Zine collection, 1999-2007 and undated

0.5 Linear Feet — 34 Items
Arbabi is an artist, DJ, writer, filmmaker, and zinester from Durham, NC and Austin, TX. She is the author of several craft and activist zines, including Radical South, Chicks Rock, and Polaroid-Celluloid. The collection consists of 34 zines (27 titles, produced between 1999 and 2007) collected by Arbabi. Eight of the zine titles in the collection were written or co-written by Arbabi. The majority of zines in the collection focus on either craftmaking and the do-it-yourself lifestyle or women's personal stories, including stories of abuse. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of 34 zines (27 titles, produced between 1999 and 2007) collected by Niku Arbabi. Eight of the zine titles in the collection were written or co-written by Arbabi. Arbabi acquired several of the zines in her collection from Parcell Press, a zine distro located in Richmond, Va. Zines authored by Arbabi that were purchased directly from Parcell Press are also included in this collection. The zines in the collection focus on craftmaking and the do-it-yourself lifestyle; feminist activism; and women's personal stories, including stories of abuse. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

New York Radical Feminists records, 1969-2011

1.2 Linear Feet
The New York Radical Feminists (NYRF) was a radical feminist group founded by Shulamith Firestone and Anne Koedt in 1969. Collection contains organizing and theory documents as well as photographs from the New York Radical Feminists, as well as groups associated in some way with the NYRF or NYRF members dating from 1969-2011.

The first 14 folders of the collection (acc. 2008-0262; dated 1969-1985) contain organizing and theory documents of the New York Radical Feminists, such as the first introduction to the group completed on December 5, 1969 by Shulamith Firestone and Anne Koedt with other members of its founding Stanton-Anthony Brigade (formed on October 3, 1969). Also included are consciousness raising topics and guidelines, lists of accomplishments and activities from 1971-1976, as well as notes from a 1971 session of the Lucy Stone Brigade; materials documenting speak-outs, conferences, and other activities; public relations and financial documents; and copies of the NYRF newsletter (1970-1977). Documents include originals as well as photocopies.

The collection includes a USB flash drive with images from the collection. These images are page scans of the entire collection except for the newsletters. Contents of the flash drive have been transferred to a library server.

Folder 15 in box 1 (acc. 2010-0203; dated 1972-1984) contains a selection of materials documenting enterprises that NYRF members participated in such as Mother Courage Restaurant, Womanbooks, Women’s CoffeeHouse, the New York Feminist Federal Credit Union, and the Women Like Me Oratory Group. Included are clippings, fliers, handouts, programs, press releases, conference schedules, newsletters, fund-raising letters, and photographs.

Box 2 of the collection (acc. 2011-0114; dated 1970-2011) contains material documenting NYRF member participation in other groups. Included are clippings, fliers, and other documents related to a range of events and spaces such as Women's Equality Day events, 35 West 22nd Street Women’s Center, East 5th Street Abandoned Women's Shelter Takeover, and the 1974-1975 New York City Feminist Community Coalition.

1 result in this collection

New York Ladies' Southern Relief Association broadsides and programs, 1867 and undated

0.1 Linear Feet — 13 items
Collection comprises thirteen programs and broadsides for private benefit musical concerts and dramas performed primarily in 1867. The majority feature dramas performed at Mr. Jerome's Private Theater. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.
1 result in this collection

New England girls' summer camps photograph album, 1916-1917

0.6 Linear Feet
Collection comprises a photograph album in two sections, containing a total of 261 black-and-white prints that feature the athletic and social activities of young female campers. The photographs were taken by an unidentified teenage girl. The first section of the album comprises 51 photographs (with captions) taken during the summer of 1916, twenty-six of them at Camp Mascoma, in Enfield, N.H., including shots of the Shaker Bridge and scenes of campers canoeing and swimming, among other activities. There are also 8 photos taken at Lost River, near North Woodstock, N.H.; 6 photos of girls with other family members at Wollaston Beach in Quincy, Mass.; and 11 photos of Boston's Franklin Park, a children's May Party, and other activities. The second section of the album contains 210 photographs (of which only 35 have captions and 10 are loose) taken during the summer of 1917 at Camp Teconnet on China Lake in China, Me. These photographs picture campers swimming, canoeing, playing basketball, doing calisthenics, posing singly and in small groups, etc. There are also many photographs of campers dressed in elaborate costumes (of dowagers, gypsies, clowns, Native Americans, etc.), including several featuring campers in male attire, impersonating Charlie Chaplin, WWI soldiers, playboys, waiters, etc.

Collection comprises a photograph album in two sections, containing a total of 261 black-and-white prints that feature the athletic and social activities of young female campers. The photographs were taken by an unidentified teenage girl. The first section of the album comprises 51 photographs (with captions) taken during the summer of 1916, twenty-six of them at Camp Mascoma, in Enfield, N.H., including shots of the Shaker Bridge and scenes of campers canoeing and swimming, among other activities. There are also 8 photos taken at Lost River, near North Woodstock, N.H.; 6 photos of girls with other family members at Wollaston Beach in Quincy, Mass.; and 11 photos of Boston's Franklin Park, a children's May Party, and other activities. The second section of the album contains 210 photographs (of which only 35 have captions and 10 are loose) taken during the summer of 1917 at Camp Teconnet on China Lake in China, Me. These photographs depict campers swimming, canoeing, playing basketball, doing calisthenics, posing singly and in small groups, etc. There are also many photographs of campers dressed in elaborate costumes (of dowagers, gypsies, clowns, Native Americans, etc.), including several featuring campers in male attire, impersonating Charlie Chaplin, WWI soldiers, playboys, waiters, etc.

1 result in this collection

Nestia V. Lloyd diaries, 1923-1925

0.2 Linear Feet — 3 volumes
Three annual diaries (1923-1925) kept by Nestia V. Lloyd, a young woman (b. 1902) living with her parents in London and Wales.

Collection consists of three bound diaries kept by Nestia V. Lloyd for the years 1923, 1924, and 1925. The early pages of the diaries include printed matter such as calendars, tips intended for women in the home (regarding cooking, cleaning, personal hygiene and health, fashion), London theaters (including Lloyd's notes about which shows she saw at which theaters), and notes. Lloyd used the diaries regularly and discussed her personal activities, gifts sent and received for various occasions, financial expenses and housekeeping, her work and schooling, her travels and activities through London and Wales, and family news.

1 result in this collection

Nava Atlas papers, 1970s-2020

Online
12.5 Linear Feet — 5 Megabytes
Fine artist and author of many cookbooks and other works of nonfiction. Collection includes materials from Atlas' dual careers as a fine artist, book artist, and as the author of vegetarian/vegan cookbooks and other works of nonfiction. Includes book proposals, correspondence, proofs and dummies, reviews, and promotional pieces from many of Atlas' published works, as well as artwork, articles, and drafts from various freelance pieces. Also contains a number of slides of Atlas' early artwork, exhibit-related correspondence and files, publisher and agent materials, and other miscellaneous files relating to her works.

This collection has been sorted into two series, reflecting the presence of materials from Atlas' dual careers as a book artist and as a vegetarian chef and cookbook author. Both series includes book proposals, correspondence, proofs and dummies, reviews, and promotional pieces from many of Atlas' published works, as well as artwork, articles, and drafts from her various freelance pieces. The collection also contains a number of slides of Atlas' early artwork, exhibit-related correspondence and files, publisher and agent materials, and other miscellaneous files relating to her works.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

National Women's Studies Association Journal records, 1990-2008

49.5 Linear Feet — 49.5 Linear Ft.
NWSA Journal, an official publication of the National Women's Studies Association, publishes interdisciplinary, multi-cultural feminist scholarship linking feminist theory with teaching and activism. Accession 2003-0263 (26,100 items; 43.5 lin. ft.; dated 1990-1998 and undated) comprises administrative files, records of the site search and other editorial board policy matters, correspondence, annual and semi-annual reports, copyedited manuscripts, readers' reports, and published manuscripts; and revisions of issues from each volume. Addition (06-006) (7 items, .1 lin. ft.; dated 1990-1998) comprises 7 issues of the NWSAction newsletter, Fall 1990-Summer 1998.Addition (06-039) (375 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2003) contains final page proofs, abstracts, advertising, research and proposals, and correspondence generated for the special issue Gender and Modernity, Fall 2003, volume 15, number 3. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2003-0263) (26,100 items; lin. ft.; dated 1990-1998 and undated) comprises administrative files, records of the site search and other editorial board policy matters, correspondence, annual and semi-annual reports, copyedited manuscripts, readers' reports, and published manuscripts; and revisions of issues from each volume.

The 2006 addition (2006-0006) (7 items, 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 1990-1998) comprises 7 issues of the NWSAction newsletter, Fall 1990-Summer 1998.

The 2006 addition (2006-0039) (375 items, 0.2 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2003) contains final page proofs, abstracts, advertising, research and proposals, and correspondence generated for the special issue Gender and Modernity, Fall 2003, volume 15, number 3.

The 2007 addition (2007-0118) (2630 items; 4.8 lin. ft.; dated 2003-2007) contains manuscripts, journal submissions, proofs, and editorial files related to 2005-2007 issues. Also included are a procedure manual, correspondence, administrative and editorial files, copies of published journals (2004-2007), and newsletters. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The 2009 addition (2009-0007) (29 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 2003-2008) contains 4 published journals (2007-2008) and electronic materials used in the creation of the journal, including 19 CDs, 5 zip discs, and 1 USB key. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The 2015 addition (2009-0098) (0.3 lin. ft.; dated 1978-2011) contains 1 box of material documenting the work of the National Women's Studies Association Journal from Margaret (Maggie) McFadden. It comprises administrative files, records of the site search and other editorial board policy matters, correspondence, journal proposals and information about applicants considered for employment. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Nancy Blood papers, 1967-1977

1.5 Linear Feet — 750 items
Nancy Blood is a retired Durham County Public Libraries librarian and is also a feminist and LGBT rights activist. Accession (2009-0101) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1967-1977 and undated) consists of a subject file of printed materials discussing women's health, employment, art, feminism, academics, law, motherhood, etc. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0101) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1967-1977 and undated) consists of a subject file of printed materials discussing women's health, employment, art, feminism, academics, law, motherhood, etc. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Nadia Boulanger note to R.I., 1963 October 6

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Collection comprises a single autograph manuscript note dated 1963 with a Paris return address from the conductor and composer Nadia Boulanger to her friend "R.I." Boulanger inquires after his recent illness and encourages him to carry on his work in the future. The note's recipient is likely the composer Robert Irving.

The collection consists of a single autograph manuscript note (dated 1963 October 6) from the French composer and conductor Nadia Boulanger to a sick friend identified as "R.I." It's likely that the recipient was the conductor Robert Irving. Boulanger inquires as to what advice he's received from his doctors, and mentions her own recent illness. She says that her faith has "brought moral relief to the physical suffering." She asks after his plans and hopes for the future, "in spite of all that makes regular work so difficult." Boulanger writes her address at the bottom of the note: 35 Rue Ballu, Paris IX.

1 result in this collection

Minnie Bruce Pratt papers, 1870s-2005, bulk 1975-2005

94 Linear Feet
Minnie Bruce Pratt was born in Selma, Alabama in 1946 and raised in nearby Centreville. She received a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa and a doctorate in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. An award-winning poet, Pratt has published collections of both poetry and essays. Pratt began teaching and grass roots organizing in North Carolina in the 1970s, and has continued her work as a professor and activist through 2008, the time of this writing. Pratt frequently makes speaking appearances at conferences and universities across the United States. Pratt has two sons, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, from her marriage (1966-1975). As of 2008, Pratt resides with longtime partner, transgender activist and author Leslie Feinberg. The collection dates primarily between 1975 and 2005 and focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. A Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Major works represented are Pratt's poetry and essay collections The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, and The Dirt She Ate. Other series in the collection are Correspondence; Family, consisting of early correspondence, mementos, photographs, and genealogical information; Activism, files of newspaper clippings, fliers, and correspondence related to Pratt's grass roots organizing; Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera. Notable correspondents include Mumia Abu-Jamal, Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers contain materials dating from the 1870s to 2005, with the bulk of the collection dating between 1975 and 2005. Materials in the collection document Pratt's work as a teacher, poet, writer, and activist. Specifically, the collection focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. The collection is organized into ten series: Writing, Correspondence, Family, Activism, Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera.

The Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Subseries include: Journals, The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, The Dirt She Ate, Feminary, Workers World, Other Writings, Grant Applications, Interviews, Gigs, and Manuscripts by Others.

The Correspondence Series contains correspondence Pratt sent and received after 1966, the year of her marriage. Subseries include: Personal Correspondence, Literary Correspondence, and General Correspondence. Notable correspondents include Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Family Series contains materials related to Pratt's childhood and relatives, including legal and business papers, genealogical information, correspondence, mementos, and photographs. The bulk of the material dates to the twentieth century, but a few documents and several photographs date to the nineteenth century. Subseries include Brown-Carr Family, Pratt Family, Minnie Bruce Pratt, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, and Leslie Feinberg.

The Activism Series documents Pratt's work as an activist supporting diversity and fighting intolerance. The series comprises newspaper clippings, fliers, correspondence, and logisitical arrangements pertaining to Pratt's organizing, conference attendances, and personal research. Subseries include: Anti-Ku Klux Klan, Fayetteville, National Endowment for the Arts, and Other Issues.

The Teaching Series documents Pratt's work as an educator at various universities, primarily The Union Institute and Hamilton College. The series comprises course syllabi, materials to supplement teaching, seminar evaluations, contracts, general faculty documents, catalogs, newspaper clippings, and correspondence. The series contains correspondence from Mumia Abu-Jamal during his application process to The Union Institute for graduate studies.

The Financial Series consists of tax returns for the years 1981 to 2004 as well as detailed narratives carefully documenting deductions taken by Pratt related to her writing and teaching career.

The Photographs Series contains photographs documenting events and individuals in Minnie Bruce Pratt's life, with descriptions provided by the donor.

The Audiovisual Material Series contains miscellaneous audiovisual material pertaining to Pratt's speaking engagements, interests, and personal life. The series includes speeches and readings given at gigs, interviews, audio correspondence, programs related to lesbian issues, and instructional materials. Materials are organized into subseries depending on format and include Audio Cassettes, Compact Discs, and Videos. Use copies will need to be created before items can be accessed by researchers. Additionally, interviews are restricted unless permission from the interviewee is obtained.

The Printed Material Series contains periodicals, booklets, printed essays, and chapbooks arranged alphabetically by title. Subjects represented include poetry, women's studies, feminism, lesbianism, and the Ku Klux Klan. A number of periodicals were removed from this collection and added to the Women's and LGBT Movements Periodicals Collection. Minnie Bruce Pratt's personal library comprising several hundred books including her own work and anthologies containing her work have been cataloged separately.

The Ephemera Series comprises miscellaneous items collected by Pratt and chiefly contains t-shirts, buttons, and posters related to Pratt's activism, the conferences and demonstrations she attended, and Feminary. Posters also document Pratt's book relases, speaking appearances, seminars, and courses. Additional items include candlesticks given to Pratt upon her marriage to Marvin Weaver, a birthday coffee mug from Leslie Feinberg, pens with printed logos, a stamp, and a vibrator, and pair of handcuffs given to Pratt by students from Iowa.

1 result in this collection

Millicent Fawcett autograph notes, 1879-1908

0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items
Millicent Garrett Fawcett (1847-1929) was an English politician, writer, and feminist. Collection comprises three autograph notes written by Fawcett.

Collection comprises three autograph notes written by Fawcett. Two (1879, 1882, with covers) were written to Mrs. Thorne at the London School of Medicine for Women, one regarding a subscription to a fund for the hospital, the other with an agreement to speak at a distribution of prizes. The final note was written to Mrs. Dalby (1908), regarding a check for traveling expenses, and her pleasure regarding meeting and talking about supporters of justice for women.

1 result in this collection

Meredith Tax papers, 1956-2016

125 Linear Feet — 213 boxes
Meredith Tax is a feminist writer and organizer who has been active since the 1960s. This large collection of her papers includes many files of records documenting her activism in feminism and her role in founding feminist organizations; drafts and manuscripts of her writings, music, and art; personal and professional correspondence; research materials; and subject files. Organizations well represented include Bread and Roses; Women's WORLD; CARASA (Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse); PEN American Center Women's Committee; and the International PEN Women's Writers Committee, as well as many other materials on other organizations. There are also 89 audio cassettes and a few VHS tapes and optical media containing Tax's research interviews as well as interviews with Tax. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

The Meredith Tax papers include materials from the activist organizations she was involved with, as well as drafts and manuscripts of her written work, some personal correspondence, teaching materials, and audio/visual materials.

The largest group of materials at over 130 boxes documents Tax's long career as an activist, beginning with her involvement in Boston's Bread and Roses, a socialist-feminist collective through her continued work with Women's WORLD, a global free speech network Tax cofounded in 1994 to fight gender-based censorship. Other organizations Tax was involved in are also well documented in the collection, including CARASA (Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse); PEN American Center Women's Committee; and International PEN Women's Writers Committee. Smaller amounts of material come from Tax's work with the October League, Chicago Women's Liberation Union, National Writers' Union, and the West Side Community School, as well as other organizations. These materials include committee and board materials, events files, conferences, and many files of organizational notes and records.

Tax's work as a writer, including books, both fiction and nonfiction, articles, essays, and speeches as well as songs, is represented in the Writings, Speeches, and Songs series. The Correspondence series includes both personal and professional correspondence. The Subject Files were created by Tax for research related to her activism and her writing.

Finally, there are 89 audiocassettes, 53 of which contain Tax's research interviews and 36 of which contain interviews with Tax, readings by Tax and board meetings. Other interviews are on several VHS videocassettes and optical discs.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

1 result in this collection

Melanie Dornier photographs, 2013-2016

1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 110 color inkjet prints — 11 3/4 x 8 inches
Collection consists of two documentary photography series taken in India by Melanie Dornier. "Mahila Thana: All Women Police Station" is comprised of 56 color digital photographs, taken in 2016, recording daily life inside the walls of the All Women Police Station of Gurugram, Haryana. The images convey the human impacts of woman-specific crimes and social justice, and the role of the police station and its female officers as a safe haven for distressed and abused women. The 54 color digital prints in "Punch My Face: Women's Boxing in India" document the daily life and experiences of Meena Kumari, a wife, mother, daughter, police officer, and boxer, 2013-2016. All prints measure 11 3/4 x 8 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection consists of two documentary photography series by Melanie Dornier taken in India. "Mahila Thana: All Women Police Station" is comprised of 56 color digital prints. The photographs - taken during 2016 - record daily life inside the walls of the All Women Police Station of Gurugram, Haryana. The 54 color digital prints in "Punch My Face: Women's Boxing in India, document the experiences of Meena Kumari, a wife, mother, buffalo owner, police officer, and boxer, between 2013 and 2016.

In an artist's statement Dornier describes that in 2012, "...the safety issues of the Indian women and gender violence were brought to the fore by the news of the gang rape and death of a young student in New Delhi, India. Since then funding and action plans have been implemented all around the country. In Gurugram, the millennium city in the state of Haryana, it was decided to open an All Women Police Station (AWPS) as in each of Haryana's districts and this was completed in August 2015. The project 'Mahila Thana,' which is 'All Women Police Station' in Hindi, documents the daily life inside the walls of the AWPS of Gurugram."

On "Punch My Face," Dornier reflects that, "Meena Kumari was born in December 1982 to a modest rural family. Now she is reaching the end of her boxing career and she hopes to soon become a police inspector. In 2001, Meena was one of the first Indian women to become a boxer and enjoyed visibility on the international scene. Her first major fight was confronting her father who believed boxing was not a respectable activity for a woman. Despite this Meena worked harder and harder and quickly reached the national and international stage in the flyweight category (51KG). Back then, female boxers were trained with young boys due to the shortage of women in the ring...at the end of 2016 and at the end of this photo documentary, we see Meena in the first months of her third pregnancy."

Dornier is the winner of the 2017 Bettye Lane Award for Feminist Photography, sponsored by the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

1 result in this collection

May Morris papers, 1909-1931 and undated

0.2 Linear Feet — 24 items
Mary "May" Morris was an English artisan, embroidery designer, jeweller, socialist, and editor. Collection comprises letters, an article, a few photographs, and several drawings. There are 16 letters and notes, dated 1909-1931, addressed to "Ada," who was Ada Culmer, the companion/caregiver for May Morris' sister, Jenny. Fifteen of these items were written by May, with one by Jenny. Subjects range from personal matters to Kelmscott business, including May’s editing of her father’s collected works. Much of the content centers on mutual friends and relatives (with a focus on Jenny's ill health); several letters also mention foreign travel. The article, "Mrs. William Morris," The Athenaeum, 1914 Feb. 7, contains the author's memories of Jane Morris, following her death. There is an albumen photograph (4.25 x 5.75-inches) by Ernest Hall of Oxford, showing May Morris at work on one of her tapestries at Kelmscott, as well as a developing out paper copy by Haines of London of a 1905 Carter and Co. photograph (6 x 4.25-inches) of Jane, May, and Jenny Morris, with Ada Culmer. In addition, there is a reproduction of a photograph of Kelmscott manor. Includes three undated reproductions of portraits of female figures.

Collection comprises letters, an article, a few photographs, and several drawings. There are 16 letters and notes, dated 1909-1931, addressed to "Ada," who was Ada Culmer, the companion/caregiver for May Morris' sister, Jenny. Fifteen of these items were written by May, with one by Jenny. Subjects range from personal matters to Kelmscott business, including May’s editing of her father’s collected works. Much of the content centers on mutual friends and relatives (with a focus on Jenny's ill health); several letters also mention foreign travel. The article, "Mrs. William Morris," The Athenaeum, 1914 Feb. 7, contains the author's memories of Jane Morris, following her death. There is an albumen photograph (4.25 x 5.75-inches) by Ernest Hall of Oxford, showing May Morris at work on one of her tapestries at Kelmscott, as well as a developing out paper copy by Haines of London of a 1905 Carter and Co. photograph (6 x 4.25-inches) of Jane, May, and Jenny Morris, with Ada Culmer. In addition, there is a reproduction of a photograph of Kelmscott manor. Includes three undated reproductions of portraits of female figures.

1 result in this collection

May Byron letter to Rev. Edwin J. Matthews, 1932 August 23

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
May Byron was a prolific British author best known for her children's books including a series of biographies and abridgements of J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan. In this letter, she responds to Rev. Edwin J. Matthews' request for the most important life lesson she's learned and for a list of her publications. Byron responds that she couldn't possibly sum up her life's experiences into one lesson, and that she can't provide a list of her publications because she's lost track of them. She does note that most of her children's books are still in print and have "been going on selling for some 20 years."

Collection consists of a single autograph manuscript letter written by May Byron to Reverend Edwin J. Matthews. Byron's return address is "c/o British Weekly" and Matthews' address is "The Rectory, Calstone, Calne, Wiltshire." Matthews had written to ask Byron, "the one lesson which has been most impressed upon me by my life's experiences." Byron replies, "These experiences have been so wide, so varied, and in several respects so unique that I could not possibly sum up their results in one lesson." Matthews had also asked Byron for a list of her writings, and she replies that she's unable to do so because she's lost track of them. She states that both the British Museum and the Library of Congress had asked her for a similar list, and she was unable to help them, in part because of her use of pseudonyms, and also because of her many years' work as a journalist. She concludes by stating that most all her writings are currently out of print, except for her children's books, "which have been going on selling for some 20 years."

1 result in this collection

Maud Ballington Booth letter to Alice Boughton, 1905 January 27

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Maud Ballington Booth was the founder, with her husband, of the Volunteers of America in 1896 and its auxiliary, the Volunteer Prison League. Collection comprises a typescript letter, signed Maud B. Booth, written to Alice Boughton on 1905 January 27, regarding a photographic portrait to be completed by Boughton.

Collection comprises a typescript letter, signed Maud B. Booth, written to Alice Boughton on 1905 January 27, regarding a photographic portrait to be completed by Boughton. On Prison League, Volunteers of America, stationary.

1 result in this collection

Mathilde Blind letter, circa 1889-1896

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item
Mathilde Blind was a writer and feminist active in late 19th century England. This letter was written by Blind thanking a correspondent for sending her a newspaper clipping containing a review of her work. She expresses gratitude for his thoughtfulness and for his "sympathetic spirit" towards her work.

The collection comprises a single autograph manuscript letter on a single folded sheet of paper with text on three sides dated June 19, but lacking a year. The manuscript address given at the top of the first page reads: Holly Cottage, The Mount, Hampstead, London, N.W. In the letter, Mathilde Blind writes to thank an unknown male correspondent for sending her a clipping from the Liverpool Mercury containing a review of one of her works. Blind writes, "Sitting here this evening, somewhat tired, somewhat despondent, there comes to me your letter. I cannot tell you how it cheered and strengthened me. There is something profoundly stirring in the thought that far away, among the great unknown multitude of one's fellow beings, there are people who have entered into one's work with a kindly sympathetic spirit."

1 result in this collection

Mary R. Beard letters to Margaret Zogbaum, 1947-1950

0.1 Linear Feet — 8 items
Mary Ritter Beard was an American historian and archivist. Collection comprises 8 letters Mary R. Beard wrote to Margaret Zogbaum, a resident of Mizzen Top in Tryon, North Carolina, between 1947 and 1950.

Collection comprises 8 letters, 3 autograph and 5 typescript, Mary R. Beard wrote to Margaret Zogbaum, a resident of Mizzen Top in Tryon, North Carolina, between 1947 and 1950. Topics include the state of the publishing industry for literature; plans for visitors; musicologists Henry S. Drinker and his wife, Sophie; and the demands of Beard's writing, including its serving as a "salvation" following her husband's death in 1948, as well as her rule for not writing introductions for works by others.

1 result in this collection

Mary Peblow letters to Lillian Aubery, 1978-1994

0.5 Linear Feet
Mary Peblow was a white woman who lived in Brooklyn, New York, during the late twentieth century and appears to have spent the majority of her later years in temporary public housing or welfare assistance hotels. This collection consists of Peblow's early 1990s correspondence to her cousin, Lillian Aubery, who also resided in Brooklyn. Peblow's letters document some characteristics of an ongoing mental illness; her distrust and dislike of healthcare systems and nursing homes, different charity organizations, and New York's government assistance programs; and her beliefs that she and her family were victims of Democratic or global conspiracies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the History of Medicine Collection.

This majority of this collection consists of Peblow's early 1990s correspondence to her cousin, Lillian Aubery, who resided in Brooklyn. Peblow's letters are written in black marker, on manila folders or postcards, and usually have no envelopes - the postage was applied directly on the item being mailed. Mary occasionally included her current address; she was moving around Brooklyn during the period of this correspondence.

The letters are all addressed to her cousin (at times 'babysitter') Lily or Lillian, and tend to revolve around repetitive themes: Mary's mother's care in different nursing homes and her death and burial; Mary's uncle Ralph Aubery's death and her theories about what happened to him; Lillian's return (or lack of return) correspondence, and Mary's occasional attempts to visit (unsuccessfully, according to these letters); Mary's distrust of Louise Aubery, described as Lillian's friend; Mary's dislike of Democrats and liberal policies, including "welfare hotels" like those she lived in. In some letters she relays some of her struggles of living unhoused in New York - for example: "I awoke at 6am to find my shopping cart with its four precious bags had vanished! And of course the Gold St. Police ignored me" (1991 May 1). She occasionally mentions current events, like the dissolution of the Soviet Union, and some New York politicians or mayors. When reading the letters in the collection, it can be challenging to discern whether Mary was writing about current or past events.

Mary described herself as a "W.A.S.P. minority" and considered herself to be oppressed and persecuted by Democratic Party policies. For example, one letter (undated, but from the 1990s): "Miss Mary, this political victim, has been kept in these metro "hotels" since Feb 1972 - Jamaica "welfare" sent me to Brooklyn (punishment) ((for complaining)) - the harassment focused Springfield "welfare" with its prevaricating lackeys; the ecumenical churches up there; scared me back down here to Empire State - too bad - nobody's going to rent to me in Brooklyn Heights, that's for sure...".

A standalone letter that accompanied this collection dates from 1978 and is directed to Lillian Aubery from Louise and Ralph Aubery. Louise writes: "Have not heard from Mary, I suppose she thinks it is not worth thanking for the money Ralph sent her. Those cardboard letters she sends are all the same messages about people long since gone, however she mentions, a surprise check from the south(?) arrives once in a while. Albert Doody the cops daughter from Mrs. Brett. Have not heard a word from Gertie suppose she can't write as her eyesight is very bad." By the 1990s, Gertrude Peblow, Ralph Aubery, and Louise Aubery were all deceased, but Mary mentioned them frequently in her letters to Lillian. This letter from 1978 suggests that Mary had been writing in this style for many years.

1 result in this collection

Mary Margaret Wade papers, 1966-2007

9.4 Linear Feet — 6555 Items
Artist, writer, and arts educator. Collection contains personal correspondence, photographs, writings and drawings, subject files, ephemera, and clippings. The photographs document Wade's personal life, her art exhibits, and trips to Cuba, Alaska, and Costa Rica. The drawings and writings primarily consist of published versions and drafts of cartoons, as well as some manuscripts of writings and drawings for texts, including the artwork for Have You Ever Seen an Ugly Bride?, an unpublished book by Wade and Elizabeth Lide. The subject files include a file for the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South, an abortion rights petition signed by Norma McCorvey, and typescripts documenting the Kilbuck family, who were ancestors of Wade's that were missionaries in Alaska. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection contains personal correspondence, photographs, writings and drawings, subject files, ephemera, and clippings. The photographs document Wade's personal life, her art exhibits, and trips to Cuba, Alaska, and Costa Rica. The drawings and writings primarily consist of published versions and drafts of cartoons, as well as some manuscripts of writings and drawings for texts, including the artwork for Have You Ever Seen an Ugly Bride?, an unpublished book by Wade and Elizabeth Lide. The subject files include a file for the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South, an abortion rights petition signed by Norma McCorvey, and typescripts documenting the Kilbuck family, who were ancestors of Wade's and Moravian missionaries in Alaska in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection