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Bertha "B" Holt papers, 1940-2010 5.5 Linear Feet — 3425 items

Bertha "B" Holt is a longtime resident of Burlington, North Carolina. She was first appointed to the N.C. House of Representatives in 1975 and later won re-election eight times. Collection includes campaign materials; correspondence, 1977-2000s; and research materials from various bills and issues from Holt's career. Other files relate to Holt's activities, including the Women's Forum of North Carolina, North Carolina Legislative Women's Caucus; the State Council for Social Legislation; the Science and Technology Board; tribute dinners and awards; clippings; a scrapbooks; and other miscellaneous papers and letters. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0097) (1650 items; 2.7 lin. ft.; dated 1970s-2008) includes campaign materials; correspondence, 1977-2000s; and research materials from various bills and issues from Holt's career, including the ERA, marital rape, wine laws, the lottery, juvenile justice, nursing, health education, mental retardation, archaeology, domestic violence, hospice, and the Holocaust. Other files relate to Holt's legislative career, including the North Carolina Legislative Women's Caucus; the State Council for Social Legislation; tribute dinners and awards; and other miscellaneous papers and letters.

Accession (2010-0104) (750 items; 1.3 lin. ft.; dated 1970-2010) includes clippings; correspondence; subject and research files from issues such as churches, seatbelt and school bus safety, welfare, gun control, and wine; committee materials, including the Science and Technology Board; a scrapbook from 1973-1979; and other miscellaneous materials.

Accession (2010-0192) (1125 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1940-2007) includes subject and research files from issues such as healthcare, education, crime, and prisons; materials from the Equal Rights Amendment; files from various events that Holt attended, including the Center for Creative Leadership, the White House Conference on Aging (1981), and files from her membership in the Women's Forum of North Carolina. Also contains materials from her Episcopal Church activities.

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Betsy Gamble Hansen was an author and Duke University alumna. In 2000, she founded the Oglethorpe University Women's Network, and she belonged to Duke University's Council on Women's Studies for three years. The Betsy Gamble Hansen Papers include drafts of and papers related to Gamble's writings, especially related to her book, Portals, Menzies family correspondence, clippings, and other papers. Materials range in date from 1902 to 2003, with the bulk being from 1902-1960 and 1996-2003.

The Betsy Gamble Hansen papers are organized into two series. The Writings series includes drafts of Hansen's 2003 novel Portals, iterations of which existed under the titles A Communion of Saints, A Gathering of Saints and Sinners, The Hawk and the Myna Bird, and Tapestry Tales. Also included in this series are papers related to the publication of the book, including publishing contracts, typeface samples, prospectuses, copyright forms, and estimates. The Menzies Family correspondence and other papers series contains letters received by Hansen's grandmother, E.B. Menzies, of Hickory, North Carolina, and her immediate family, clippings, and other papers. The bulk of the correspondence in this series was written by Menzies's sons, Bruce, George, and Tom Menzies, and her daughters Mary Stuart Menzies Tarrant and Jane Menzies Gamble (Betsy Gamble Hansen's mother). Other frequent correspondents include Tom's wife, Frances Menzies, and George's wife, Betty Menzies. Also included are birthday cards, Christmas cards, and letters for E.B. Menzies from friends. Two folders labeled "Family Correspondence" consist of correspondence between E.B. Menzies's children and their spouses. Peppered throughout these folders are letters from E.B. Menzie's grandchildren, including Betsy Gamble Hansen.

Mrs. E. B. Menzies was born Reesie Tipton Warren in 1880 in Emory, Virignia and died in 1961. She lived most of her life in Hickory, NC. She married Edward Bruce Menzies in 1902, and they remained together until Edward died in 1924. Most of the pre-1930 correspondence in the collection consists of letters from E.B. Menzies's extended family and a few letters from her children while away at camp. The children wrote infrequently in the 1930s. During this time Tom, George, and Bruce traveled across the country from their hometown of Hickory, North Carolina, in search of work, while Jane and Mary Stuart remained at home. From 1932-1935, the three men each attended the Colorado School of Mines and performed construction work for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) project to build the Hoover Dam, then held temporary jobs in several different cities before settling in California. Tom and Bruce attended college while George appears to have continued working.

During World War II, each of E.B. Menzies's sons enlisted as United States Navy Seabees in the Pacific Theater, and began to write home much more frequently. Tom graduated in 1942 and was immediately subject to the draft, while Bruce and George began service several months later. None of the three men appear to have seen much conflict, and each survived the war unharmed, although Bruce did stay in a Navy Hospital for some time, apparently due to a stomach illness. Jane and Mary Stuart kept in frequent contact with their brothers throughout the war. All three men were discharged by 1945.

In the late 1940s and 1950s, each of E.B. Menzies's sons settled in California with their wives and children. George began working for a rail line, Tom took a job at a mill, and Bruce sold insurance. E.B. Menzies moved to California to teach for two years before moving back to North Carolina. Each of her children kept in regular correspondence with her throughout the 1950s, but the letters stop in 1961, when E.B. Menzies died.

In addition to the correspondence in this series, this series contains clippings and other papers compiled by E.B. Menzies, including a small amount of financial papers, prescriptions, and materials relating to her children.

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Photojournalist who documented the women's movement and associated human rights issues since the 1960s. The photographs in the collection date from 1959 to 2007, with the bulk taken by Lane in the 1970s and 1980s. Subjects focus largely on events and individuals. Events include consciousness raising groups, planning meetings, and local women's conferences. Large events include Equal Rights Amendment demonstrations, and International Women's Year and National Organization for Women conferences and marches, in major cities such as New York City, Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Houston. Other events folders document Pro-Choice rallies and protests addressing harassment, sexism, and violence towards women. Another large series documents women involved in the movement, from feminist leaders to event attendees and coordinators. Subject folder photographs are of women at work, women athletes, men for women's rights, and events relating to daycare, feminist slogans and signs, lesbian rights, opposition, women of color, sexist images, and sexual health. Smaller sets of images document protests against war, pornography, and nuclear power. The collection also includes photographs of Bettye Lane and her original inventory sheets. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Bettye Lane photographs date from 1959 to 2007, with the bulk taken in the 1970s and 1980s. Subjects focus largely on events and individuals. Events include consciousness raising groups, planning meetings, and local women's conferences. Large events include Equal Rights Amendment demonstrations, and International Women's Year and National Organization for Women conferences and marches, in major cities such as New York City, Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Houston. Other events folders document Pro-Choice rallies and protests addressing harassment, sexism, and violence towards women. Another large series documents women involved in the movement, from feminist leaders to event attendees and coordinators. Subject folder photographs are of women at work, women athletes, men for women's rights, and events relating to daycare, feminist slogans and signs, lesbian rights, opposition, women of color, sexist images, and sexual health. Smaller sets of images document protests against war, pornography, and nuclear power. The collection also includes a folder of photographs of Bettye Lane spanning her career.

The photographs are arranged into three series, Events, People, and Subjects, with subdivisions in alphabetical order, and the prints within in date or alphabetical order. The original order as assembled by Lane is for the most part intact, with folder titles deriving from the original headings. Included in each folder are her original annotated inventory sheets, which include dates, photo identification codes, and titles.

Almost all the prints are unmounted black-and-white gelatin silver process prints, with some color photographs scattered throughout, and a few digital prints from the 2000s. The larger prints all have detailed information on the backs, many giving names of individuals present, details on the events, and contextual notes. There are also a few photocopies scattered throughout. There are some duplicate images or cropped versions. The most typical sizes are 8x10 and 6 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches, with some snapshots found in a few folders.

There is some overlap with Bettye Lane images in other U.S. institutional collections, noted below, but many of the images at Duke University are unique.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Bill Brown is a filmmaker, photographer, and zinester from Lubbock, Texas. His films explore the landscapes of North America, including the United States–Mexico border, North Dakota missile silos, and the Trans-Canada Highway, and have been exhibited at film festivals and museums around the world. He received a BFA from Harvard in 1992 and a MFA from CalArts in 1997. Brown is the author of a zine called Dream Whip as well as a novel on the underground in L.A., Saugus to the Sea. In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

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This collection consists of zines, primarily authored by women, acquired as donations from multiple collectors or purchased from book stores, zine fairs, and zine distributors. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

This collection consists of zines, primarily authored by women, acquired as donations from multiple collectors or purchased from book stores, zine fairs, and zine distributors. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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In 1996, Bitch: Feminst Response to Pop Culture was created by Lisa Jervis, Benjamin Shaykin, and Andi Zeisler. After having a hard time finding critiques of sexism in pop culture in magazines and self published zines, they decided to make their own. Their goals are to write about sexism in pop culture, propose alternatives, and promote pop products that are pro-woman and pro-feminism. Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Blackwell family papers, 1845-1976 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 136 items

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to Blackwell family members from other family members; including Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to from other family members to Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

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Bonnie Lee Black papers, 1981-2015 36 Linear Feet — 23 boxes (numbering skips 18)

Bonnie Lee Black is a writer, editor, writing teacher, and chef who has worked both domestically and internationally. The collection centers primarily on her work as a writer, as a member of the Peace Corps in Gabon, as a professor in New Mexico, and as the creator of an economic development project in Mali aimed at teaching local seamstresses the art of patchwork quilt-making.

The Bonnie Lee Black papers comprise personal correspondence, materials from her time working in Mali, teaching materials from her time as a professor at the University of New Mexico-Taos, documents from her experience in the Peace Corps in Gabon and Mali, and materials generated from two of her books, How to Make an African Quilt and How to Cook a Crocodile.

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Collection contains fourteen broadsides and handbills from British women's suffrage societies, primarily the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, but including the Conservative and Unionist Women's Franchise Association and the London Society for Women's Suffrage, as well as one handbill from the Cambridge Daily News. Two broadsides announce suffragist marches, including one in support of women's military service during World War I. Several handbills provide general information on women's suffrage and suffrage societies, others are intended for specific audiences, including working and affluent women. Other topics include protests against use of violence in the suffragist cause, the Conciliation Bill for Women's Suffrage, and positions of various elected officials on the issue. The back of one broadside holds a handwritten excerpt from an unrelated drama.

Collection contains fourteen broadsides and handbills from British women's suffrage societies, primarily the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, but including the Conservative and Unionist Women's Franchise Association and the London Society for Women's Suffrage, as well as one handbill from the Cambridge Daily News. Two broadsides announce suffragist marches, including one in support of women's military service during World War I. Several handbills provide general information on women's suffrage and suffrage societies, others are intended for specific audiences, including working and affluent women. Other topics include protests against use of violence in the suffragist cause, the Conciliation Bill for Women's Suffrage, and positions of various elected officials on the issue. The back of one broadside holds a handwritten excerpt from an unrelated drama.

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This collection documents the work of the Durham, NC environmental artist Bryant Holsenbeck. It contains materials collected over the course of her career, including media clippings, publicity, photographs, and a portfolio.

This collection includes gallery materials, correspondence, postcards, publicity materials, exhibit posters, clippings about Bryant Holsenbeck, documentation of Holsenbeck's work, photographs, a DVD production about Holsenbeck, and an art portfolio.