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Abigail Buttons was the daughter of Desire Clark. Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever.

Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever and asks for "... prayers for me that God would inable me to behave my self in Christian manner in whatsoever he calls me to meet with." She requests a visit from her mother and her brother, John.

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Abortion Conversation Project records, 2000-2008 2.2 Linear Feet — 1600 Items

The Abortion Conversation Project was founded in 2000 to create strategies to challenge the stigma surrounding abortion. ACP was originally conceived as the 501(c)(3) sister to the National Coalition for Abortion Providers, a lobbying and trade organization for independent abortion providers. In July 2008, both organizations joined forces to form the Abortion Care Network. General administrative, financial, programmatic, and educational records; correspondence; founding documents; records of the board of directors; and files from Peg Johnston, co-founder of the Abortion Conversation Project. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes general administrative, financial, programmatic, and educational records; correspondence; founding documents; records of the board of directors; and files from Peg Johnston, co-founder of the Abortion Conversation Project. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Seven mounted photographs and five pamphlets from the Abortion Rights Association of New York, later known as the Abortion Rights Association, Inc., dating between 1972 and 1974. Pamphlets explain abortion procedures, clinic and physician guidelines, and women's rights to abortion, largely designed to address and implement the Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade. Photographs (which contain captions) include black-and-white images of tools used in self-induced abortions; coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-induced abortions; morgue photographs of infanticide victims; and images of fetuses in utero.

Collection consists of a set of seven mounted photographs, apparently intended for exhibition, and a set of five pro-choice pamphlets created by the Abortion Rights Association of New York (later known as Abortion Rights Association, Inc.). The photographs include coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-inflicted abortions; morgue photographs of infanticides; equipment and tools used in self-inflicted abortions; and fetuses in utero, one with deformed brain. Author of the included captions is unknown. The pamphlets, written to assist New York physicians and practioners implementing the Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, address women's rights to clinical abortions, abortion laws, counseling and guidance on policies, and references to New York abortion clinics and practitioners.

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Ada Lovelace was a mathematician in 19th century England and the only legitimate child of the poet George Gordon, Lord Byron. She is often recognized as the creator of the first set of instructions meant to be carried out by a machine, and is thus seen as a pioneer of what would later become computer programming. The Ada Lovelace letter is a one-page note to [Fortunato] Prandi, an Italian interpreter, regarding ten guineas Lovelace owed Prandi.

Consists of a single hand-written letter to [Fortunato] Prandi, dated Thursday 5th August. Date could be 1841 or 1847. One page, folded, written on front and back.

The letter is apparently in reply to a request for ten guineas owed by Lovelace to Prandi. She discusses putting off sending him the sum because of travel and also "disagreeable business." She goes on to say she is well in spite of being a "disconsolate widow" and will soon "leave town", "probably to Brighton". The letter closes with an apology for the lateness of repayment and includes a postscript noting her amusement at the "modesty" of his request. It is signed A. A. Lovelace.

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Adelaide Johnson, 1859-1955, was a suffragist, artist, and sculptor. Her original name was Sarah Adeline Johnson; she changed her name to Adelaide in 1878. Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

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Advertising Ephemera collection, 1850s-1980s 35 Linear Feet — 9,279 items

The Advertising Ephemera Collection is composed of single advertisements, product and trade catalogs, advertising pamphlets, and broadsides. The advertisements are primarily American and from the late 19th and early to mid 20th century.

The Advertising Ephemera Collection is composed of single advertisements, product and trade catalogs, advertising pamphlets, and broadsides. The advertisements are primarily American and from the late 19th and early to mid 20th century. The collection is divided into broad subject categories, based on the primary type of product or service being advertised, which are arranged in alphabetical order. Within each subject category material is divided based upon the form of the material; leaflets, letters, and sheets printed on both sides; trade cards (mechanical, metamorphic, see-thru, shape, fabric inserts, unusual feature, postcards and insert cards); booklets; special categories; and miscellaneous. A subseries of foreign advertising material consists predominately of travel related literature and is arrange alphabetically by country. The arrangement of oversize materials parallels the original arrangement.

The researcher should note that trade catalogs that are pamphlets may be found in several places in the Perkins Library: this collections; individually in the stacks as fully cataloged items; or as part of groups of old pamphlets for which the cataloging was by main entry only. Advertising broadsides may also be found in the Broadsides Collection and many collections of manuscripts also contain advertising materials.

Some useful reference sources for gathering further information on this type of material include:

Romaine, Lawrence B., "A Guide to American Trade Catalogs," 1944-1900 (New York, 1960).

Hammond, Dorothy, "Advertising Collectibles of Times Past," (Des Moines, Iowa, 1974).

Kaduck, John M., "Advertising Trade Cards," (Des Moines, Iowa, 1976).

McQuarry, Jim, "Collectors Guide to Advertising Cards," (Gas City, Indiana, 1975).

Additions to the collection have not been processed and therefore to do reflect the arrangement of the rest of the collection. Please refer to the detailed description below for more information about their content.

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Agnes Smedley letters, 1930s-1947 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Agnes Smedley was a journalist, writer, and left-wing activist remembered for her activity on behalf of the Communist cause in China during the 1930s. It is believed that she engaged in extensive espionage activities while she lived in Shanghai from 1929-1941. The Agnes Smedley letters consist of three letters by Smedley, the first of which was written while she lived in Shanghai, and the second two while she lived at the Yaddo artists' colony during the 1940s. The first letter is a request for a social engagement, and the second two letters discuss the particulars of her political observations and writings while she lived and worked in China.

The collection consists of three letters written by Agnes Smedley; the first to a Miss Gates, and the second two addressed to Corporal James A. Frankel. The single-page autograph manuscript letter to Miss Gates is written on letterhead stationery with Smedley's Shanghai address identifying her as the "Correspondent of the Frankfurter Zeitung in China." She asks Miss Gates to have "tiffin or tea" with her and wonders "Do you ever have extra time to see strange people?" The second manuscript letter, two leaves with text on all four sides, is dated December 27th, 1944. It primarily concerns Emily Hahn's book "China To Me." Smedley writes, “Miss Hahn spent 9 years sleeping around in Shanghai ... When the Japs took Hong Kong she wrote that she would just have died had she gone to a concentration camp like other Americans. So she went to the Japs and said, 'I’m a bad girl.' So the Japs left her free and she fooled around with them in Hong Kong, drinking and carousing, while the bastards were killing our men... But we Americans find this 'hot stuff' and put it up as a best seller... Miss Hahn is a propagandist for the Chinese reaction. She’s never seen a Chinese Communist, yet she’s agitating against them in N.Y... She led a purely personal life in two Chinese port cities but now poses as an authority on political and military matters of China." The third letter, autograph typescript dated March 23d 1947, was originally enclosed in Frankel’s copy of Smedley's book Battle Hymn of China, and addresses Frankel's questions about the Xi'an Incident of 1936 and the capture of Chiang Kai-shek. Smedley directs Frankel to her article on the topic published in The Nation magazine, as well as "her book."

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The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Ailecia Ruscin is a writer, activist, and scholar from San Antonio, Texas and Auburn, Alabama. She is the author or co-author of the zines provo-CAT-ive and alabama grrrl (published from 1997-2000).

The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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The Irish historian Alice Stopford Green writes to an unidentified editor or publisher to decline an invitation to write an article on Irish Americans for an upcoming publication.

Green writes to an unidentified male editor or publisher ("Dear Sir"), to decline his invitation to write an article for a forthcoming book. She writes that she is "overwhelmed by work this winter," and that "the subject of the American Irish is almost unknown to me and it would need a considerable time and reading to write anything worthy of your insertion." In conclusion, she writes that she is "keeping in view the idea of getting some work done which may draw attention to your publications." Written on letterhead: 36 Grosvenor Road, Westminster.

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Alix Kates Shulman papers, 1892-2014, bulk 1968-2014 39.5 Linear Feet — 29,625 Items

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Prominent feminist, author, and political activist in the 1960s and 70s. Author of MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN (1972), ON THE STROLL (1980), and DRINKING THE RAIN (1995). The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to 2000). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to the present). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Other topics covered by the collection include: her teaching and other academic work; her public speaking and conference activities; and her involvement in political activities besides feminism. This collection sheds valuable light on the concerns and tensions within the women's liberation and second-wave feminist movements. In particular, the materials document debates and disagreements among those active in the movement with regard to sexuality, marriage and domestic relations, women's financial situation and careers, health care, civil rights and cultural expression. Many of these issues are raised in Shulman's own work, including her novels, essays, short fiction, personal letters and her teaching materials.

The collection is divided into seven series. The Personal Papers Series contains Shulman's family history papers, photographs, biographical papers, and her personal correspondence (with writers, academics, political activists and family members). Notable correspondents include Ros Baxandall, Jay Bolotin, Kay Boyle, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Judy Chicago, Andrea Dworkin, Candace Falk, Marilyn French, Lori Ginzberg, Hannah Green, Erica Jong, Kate Millett, Honor Moore, Robin Morgan, Tillie Olson, Lillian Rubin, Sue Standing, and Meredith Tax. The Political Work Series contains material relating to Shulman's involvement with feminist and other liberal political groups, including Redstockings, New York Radical Women, the PEN Women's Committee, No More Nice Girls, the Women's Action Coalition, and Women Against Government Surveillance

The Literary Work Series contains a variety of materials relating to Shulman's literary career, including financial and other dealings with publishing houses, notes and research, photocopies of publications, reviews of her work, articles and notes she collected regarding the literary scene, and original manuscripts. This series contains information about her early children's books; several books she edited of Emma Goldman's writings; her essays and short fiction; her novels Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen (1972), Burning Questions (1975), On the Stroll (1977), In Every Woman's Life . . . (1980); and her memoirs Drinking the Rain (1995) and A Good Enough Daughter (1999). A small amount of correspondence regarding book reviews of other authors' work is also included.

The Academic Work Series contains materials relating to Shulman's graduate work at NYU; her teaching at Yale, the University of Colorado at Boulder, NYU, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa; as well as her relationships with her students. The Public Speaking Series contains materials relating to Shulman's participation in literary and political conferences and gatherings, personal interviews, lectures and book talks.

Portions of the Restricted Materials Series either may not be photocopied without prior permission of Ms. Shulman or the relevant author, or may not be accessed until a future date. The same organizational categories have been applied to the restricted materials as were used in the unrestricted materials to help researchers easily access overlapping and related materials that have been boxed separately due to the restrictions. The Oversize Materials Series contains miscellaneous oversize materials of a biographical and literary nature.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures, including authors, poets, playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages.

The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including authors and poets, as well as twentieth-century playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. There are often letters and notes bearing autographs of the authors, some of them purchased by Taylor, or obtained with the assistance of Taylor's mother or her friend, Dorothy Kraus. Unfortunately, many of the autographed items have been removed. Pages often include handwritten or typed lists of works. There are several black-and-white photographs, along with photo postcards, and regular postcards. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages. Scrapbooks have been disbound for conservation purposes.

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Amanda Smith papers, 1950s-2000s 16 Linear Feet — 12000 Items

Author (fiction and non-fiction) and gender equity consultant from Durham, N.C. Collection includes materials from Smith's literary career as an author of mystery novels, files from her work as a gender equity consultant, her newspaper columns on gender in the workplace, and materials from her work with youth at St. Philip's Episcopal Church in Durham. Also includes a small amount of correspondence from Smith's college years and family photographs from the early 20th century. The files relating to her fiction writing also include a set of audiocassettes related to one of her books. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes materials from Smith's literary career as an author of mystery novels, files from her work as a gender equity consultant, her newspaper columns on gender in the workplace, and materials from her work with youth at St. Philip's Episcopal Church in Durham. Also includes a small amount of correspondence from Smith's college years and family photographs from the early 20th century. The files relating to her fiction writing also include a set of audiocassettes related to one of her books. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Amelia Stinson-Wesley is an ordained Methodist minister and advocate for pastoral care of women and abuse survivors in North Carolina. Her papers consist of correspondence, academic writing, periodical excerpts, pamphlets, flyers, and handouts.

Amelia Stinson-Wesley is an ordained Methodist minister and advocate for pastoral care of women and abuse survivors. Her papers consist of correspondence, academic writing, periodical excerpts, pamphlets, flyers, and handouts.

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Collection comprises an pin with the text "American Women's Voluntary Services" on a background of red, white, and blue enamel. The back of the pin is marked "Bastian Brothers Co, Rochester, N.Y."

Collection comprises an pin with the text "American Women's Voluntary Services" on a background of red, white, and blue enamel. The back of the pin is marked "Bastian Brothers Co, Rochester, N.Y."

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Amy Mariaskin Zine collection, 1995-2005 3 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Amy Mariaskin began collecting and trading zines with other women as a member of the Pittsburgh, PA, Riot Grrrl Chapter from 1995-2002. She authored the zine Southern Fried Darling from 1995-2002, and Vortext, about meteorology and weather. Collection consists of about 150 zines, mostly self-published by women and girls in the United States. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, music, mental health, depression and mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, transgender issues, and race. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of about 150 zines, mostly self-published by women and girls in the United States. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, music, mental health, depression and mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, transgender issues, and race. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Letter from the writer Anaïs Nin to the American book collector, Thomas DiGenti, who is trying to find a copy of her literary magazine Two Cities. Nin does not have one, but directs him to the NYC bookshop The Phoenix, on Cornelia St. She has turned over distribution of Two Cities to The Phoenix at a financial loss due to constraints on her time. Nin writes of her desire to publish the work of new writers. She goes on to describe a recent trip to Europe where she visited London, Brussels, and Paris, where she was well-received because of the popularity of her work there. Nin asks the collector, Thomas C. Di Genti, if he has an extra copy of her book D,H. Lawrence: An unprofessional study. She wants to send it to her London publisher, who is interested in putting out a new edition. Nin states that she's currently busy writing Seduction of the Minotaur, the last part of her Cities of the Interior sequence which she describes as a "finale to the novels."

Letter from the writer Anaïs Nin to the American book collector, Thomas DiGenti, who is trying to find a copy of her literary magazine Two Cities. Nin does not have one, but directs him to the NYC bookshop The Phoenix, on Cornelia St. She has turned over distribution of Two Cities to The Phoenix at a financial loss due to constraints on her time. Nin writes of her desire to publish the work of new writers. She goes on to describe a recent trip to Europe where she visited London, Brussels, and Paris, where she was well-received because of the popularity of her work there. Nin asks the collector, Thomas C. Di Genti, if he has an extra copy of her book D,H. Lawrence: An unprofessional study. She wants to send it to her London publisher, who is interested in putting out a new edition. Nin states that she's currently busy writing Seduction of the Minotaur, the last part of her Cities of the Interior sequence which she describes as a "finale to the novels."

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Anna Letitia Barbauld was an English woman of letters who had great professional success at a time when women writers were still something of an anomaly. She is remembered for her poetry, children's literature, essays, criticism, and editorial works. She was rediscovered when feminist literary critics examined her place in British literary history. Barbauld was also an abolitionist, something she had in common with fellow educator and Stoke Newington resident William Allen. This item is a single small sheet of paper with an autograph manuscript poem by Barbauld on the front dated August 23, 1823, and another one on the back by William Allen dated August 30, 1823. Both poems were aimed at a juvenile audience. It is likely that their common interests and close proximity led them to develop a friendship. Although this was written towards the end of Barbauld's life, it is evidence that they still had at least an epistolary relationship in 1823.

Collection consists of a single piece of paper (20 x 12.5 cm) with an autograph manuscript poem by Anna Letitia Barbauld on the front and a poem called "Follow Me" by William Allen on the back. Barbauld's poem reads as follows: Born to the weighty honours of a name/Whose deeds of mercy England's shores proclaim/Yet know, you may inherit lands or pelf/But must, for praise - for love, be good yourself. It's signed A.L. Barbauld and dated August 23rd 1823. The verso contains a two-stanza autograph manuscript devotional poem by William Allen titled "Follow Me." It is signed Stoke Newington 30 of 8th month 1823. Barbauld and Allen were both educators and abolitionists who lived in Stoke Newington at the time of this writing. These poems are evidence that they had at least an epistolary friendship.

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Anna Lora Weiss Account Books, 1896-1910 0.2 Linear Feet — 2 Items

Anna Lora Weiss, born circa 1858, lived in Boston's Dorchester section and owned several rental properties throughout the city. She was also a member of several voluntary and charitable associations, including the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and the Commitee on Music for the School Committee of Boston. Her family, including her mother Mary Clapp Weiss, brothers Richard and Carl, and sister Mary, were of German descent. Collection contains two account books, dated 1896-1904 and 1905-1910 respectively, kept by Anna Lora Weiss of Boston, Mass. The account books meticulously document Weiss's income, including significant income she received from her rental properties and other investments, as well as her expenditures on travel, household goods, gifts, and charitable contributions. In addition, the account books indicate that Weiss loaned money at interest to her brother Carl for his often unsuccessful business endeavors. In addition to her finances, the account books also document Weiss's daily activities and social and political interests. Together, the account books reveal that Weiss was an active, independent, and astute businesswoman. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection contains two account books, dated 1896-1904 and 1905-1910 respectively, kept by Anna Lora Weiss of Boston, Mass. The account books meticulously document Weiss's income, including significant income she received from her rental properties and other investments, as well as her expenditures on travel, household goods, gifts, and charitable contributions. In addition, the account books indicate that Weiss loaned money at interest to her brother Carl for his often unsuccessful business endeavors. In addition to her finances, the account books also document Weiss's daily activities and social and political interests. Together, the account books reveal that Weiss was an active, independent, and astute businesswoman.

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Anna Mitchell was a resident of Upland, California. Collection comprises a letter (14 pages) written by Anna Mitchell to Sarah, dated September 10, probably written later than 1920. Anna describes the illness and death of her six-year-old son, Preston, giving a day-by-day, sometimes an hour-by-hour, account of his symptoms, as well as treatments and diagnoses by a female doctor, Dr. Gregory. At first the diagnosis is rheumatism, then typhoid, then meningitis. Anna describes his "suffering so with the heat," with "pain down the right side in the region of the liver," "sunken cheeks," and crying with headache, fever, and vomiting. Paralysis comes later. Anna goes on to describe his death, the preparation of his body, the home viewing, and his cremation in Pasadena. She also describes her regrets and her grief; "... whose life was so much dearer to me than my own life, that since he is gone, nothing but darkness & sorrow is left us. Even for those that are left me--I cannot feel that I have courage or strength to make the effort to live."

Collection comprises a letter (14 pages) written by Anna Mitchell to Sarah, dated September 10, probably written later than 1920. Anna describes the illness and death of her six-year-old son, Preston, giving a day-by-day, sometimes an hour-by-hour, account of his symptoms, as well as treatments and diagnoses by a female doctor, Dr. Gregory. At first the diagnosis is rheumatism, then typhoid, then meningitis. Anna describes his "suffering so with the heat," with "pain down the right side in the region of the liver," "sunken cheeks," and crying with headache, fever, and vomiting. Paralysis comes later. Anna goes on to describe his death, the preparation of his body, the home viewing, and his cremation in Pasadena. She also describes her regrets and her grief; "... whose life was so much dearer to me than my own life, that since he is gone, nothing but darkness & sorrow is left us. Even for those that are left me--I cannot feel that I have courage or strength to make the effort to live." Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collection and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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African-American civil rights activist from Durham, N.C; subject of the 2002 film, An Unlikely Friendship. Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C. P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C.P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

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Anne Baker was an abortion counselor, serving as the Director of Counseling at the Hope Clinic for Women in Granite City, Illinois for the majority of her career. The Anne Baker papers consist of informational pamphlets, handouts, forms, workshop evaluations, personal writings, newspaper clippings, photographs, correspondence, VCRs, DVDs, cassettes, buttons, and sweatshirts.

The Anne Baker papers contains documentation of Baker's personal life and of her professional role as the Director of Counseling at the Hope Clinic of Granite City, Illinois. They include materials from workshops and trainings she gave, secondary literature about abortion counseling, correspondence, materials from different protests that she and other Hope Clinic staff attended, personal notes, histories of the Hope Clinic, and newspaper clippings from the kidnapping of Dr. Hector Zevallos and his wife Jean Rosalie Zevallos.

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Anne Firor Scott papers, 1939-2009 19 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

The collection contains writings of Anne Firor Scott and materials relating to her academic work in Southern and women's history. The materials primarily refer to her scholarly activities, and include her dissertation, occasional papers, articles, speeches and lectures, book reviews, contracts, conference proceedings and schedules, course materials, newspaper clippings, and other activities related to academia. There is also a file of correspondence written by Anna Lord Strauss (then president of the League of Women Voters) in 1949 and mailed to all members the league. Notes by Scott in this file explain her connection to Strauss, and the circumstances of the correspondence. In addition, there are newspaper articles related to the first and second editions of Scott's book, The Southern Lady. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Preliminary container lists exist for only parts of the collection.

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Annie Besant letters, 1882-1883 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Annie Besant was a British socialist, theosophist, women's rights activist, writer and orator, and supporter of Irish and Indian self-rule. Collection comprises two autograph, signed letters written by Annie Besant. The first, written 1882 May 20, originally accompanied a copy of a petition, and asked the editor of the Evening News to publish the petition, since he published an attack upon "Dr. E. Aveling, the Misses Bradlaugh" and herself, "as teachers of the Science School of the Hall of Science." The second, written 1883 December 4 to an unidentified addressee, indicated "the place of the meeting is the Grosvenor Gallery."

Collection comprises two autograph, signed letters written by Annie Besant. The first, written 1882 May 20, originally accompanied a copy of a petition, and asked the editor of the Evening News to publish the petition, since he published an attack upon "Dr. E. Aveling, the Misses Bradlaugh" and herself, "as teachers of the Science School of the Hall of Science." The second, written 1883 December 4 to an unidentified addressee, indicated "the place of the meeting is the Grosvenor Gallery." Both items written on Besant's stationery, with her name and address printed in brown ink.

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Ann Lovett is an artist who teaches at the State University of New York at New Paltz. This collection documents her artistic and academic career with a focus on her work in the book arts.

The collection contains materials documenting Lovett's artistic and academic career, including artists' book production materials and photographs.

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Arielle Greenberg is a poet, editor, and assistant professor in the English department at Columbia College, Chicago, Ill. This collection consists of 367 zines dated from 1973 to 1995, likely collected by the donor from 1992-1995. The collection primarily includes personal zines by women (though some are by men) that focus on the riot grrrl scene, feminism, punk music, and progressive political causes. Many of the zines include correspondence from the authors. The collection also includes personal correspondence and correspondence from zine authors between 1987 and 1995, with the bulk dating from 1993 to 1995.

This collection consists of 367 zines dated from 1973 to 1995, likely collected by the donor from 1992-1995. The collection primarily includes personal zines by women (though some are by men) that focus on the riot grrrl scene, feminism, punk music, and progressive political causes. Many of the zines include correspondence from the authors. The collection also includes personal correspondence and correspondence from zine authors between 1987 and 1995, with the bulk dating from 1993 to 1995. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Collection comprises a signed letter (2 leaves; 20 cm x 27 cm) from Artemisia Gentileschi to patron Cassiano Dal Pozzo, written from Naples 1630 August 31. She requests his help in acquiring a license for her assistant, Diego Campanili, to carry arms, and mentions work she is completing for the Empress and a portrait she is painting for Dal Pozzo.

Collection comprises a signed letter (2 leaves; 20 cm x 27 cm) from Artemisia Gentileschi to patron Cassiano Dal Pozzo, written from Naples 1630 August 31. She requests his help in acquiring a license for her assistant, Diego Campanili, to carry arms, and mentions work she is completing for the Empress and a portrait she is painting for Dal Pozzo.

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The Association of Professional Communication Consultants (APCC) is an organization dedicated to educating new consultants and helping existing consultants expand and improve their businesses. The APCC records also include materials from the Association of Professional Writing Consultants (APWC), the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), and the Association of Business Communication (ABC). These entities often worked together on projects and workshops aimed at educating consultants and spreading knowledge about the profession. The collection comprises administrative materials, information about workshops, and documents belonging to former APCC President Barbara Shwom.

The collection is arranged into the following 2 series: Administrative/Organizational materials and former APCC President Barbara Shwom materials. The APCC administrative and organizational materials date from 1983 to 2017 and comprise membership directories, correspondence, budgetary and financial information, meeting minutes, and workshop handouts. The Barbara Shwom materials date from the 1981 to the 2000 and comprise her personal correspondence and APWC materials.

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The Atlanta Lesbian Feminist Alliance (ALFA) was a grassroots lesbian feminist activist organization founded in 1972 and disbanded in 1994. The ALFA Periodicals Collection, dated 1962-1994, contains over 800 grassroots newsletter and journal titles from feminist, LGBT, and other activist groups primarily located in the Southeast but also including titles from around the U.S. and abroad. Many of the titles are now ephemeral and not found in any library. The collection was originally established and maintained as part of the Atlanta Lesbian Feminist Alliance's library and archives. Also included are non-regional women's and lesbian journals from the early women's movement as well as some long runs of gay newspapers published throughout the U.S. and Canada.

The ALFA Periodicals Collection, dated 1962-1994, contains over 800 grassroots newsletter and journal titles, many of which are now ephemeral and not in any library. The publications were collected by ALFA generally by means of exchange subscriptions with other lesbian, feminist, and activist groups from all over the U.S. and abroad. The periodicals cover a range of topics of interest and concern to socialist lesbian feminists. In addition to strictly lesbian and feminist publications, there is a wealth of publications from other leftist activist groups covering political and social causes from anti-nuclear weapons, to AIDS activism, to the beginnings of the men's movement. The collection helps document these various political movements as well as the issues facing the people whose task it was to document them.

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Ayun Halliday papers, 1990-2015 11 Linear Feet — 18 boxes — 11.0 linear feet

Ayun Halliday is an American writer and actress. Her works center primarily on the areas of motherhood, travel, and women's social issues. The Ayun Halliday Papers contain her writings including books, plays, and the zine East Village Inky; as well as correspondence and ephemera related to her publications; zines by others and artwork.

The Ayun Halliday Papers are arranged into the following nine series: Correspondence, Grants and Awards, Workshops and speaking engagements, Writings-Books, Writings-Plays, Writings-Zines, Writings-Other Publications, Mail Art Publications (by others), and Zines by Others.

The first seven of these series comprise Halliday's personal writings and works including books, plays, artwork and the zine East Village Inky. The collection also includes correspondence and ephemera related to her publications, as well as items associated with workshops and speaking engagements given by Halliday about underground press publications, female travel, autobiographical writing and other topics.

The final two series represent more than 200 zines and works Halliday collected from others artists obtained primarily through trade with other creators. These publications span a wide range of subjects intended for both adults and children including feminism, motherhood, child rearing, New York City, zines, art, music, travel, food and cooking, body image and consciousness, sexual education, and more.

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Batya Weinbaum papers, 1960-2015 46.5 Linear Feet — 82 boxes — 1.4 Gigabytes

Batya Weinbaum is a Jewish American artist, musician, poet, author, editor and professor. In addition to founding and editing the interdisciplinary feminist journal Femspec, she has published 17 books and more than 250 articles, poems, essays and reviews. She has made significant contributions to the fields of multiculturalism, women's studies, sexuality studies and education. The Batya Weinbaum papers consist of 83 boxes, spanning the years 1960-2015, and document a significant portion of her personal and professional history. The collection contains substantial materials related to Weinbaum's writing and research, including drafts of her books, materials related to the journal Femspec, and several decades of journals and sketchbooks.

This collection documents Weinbaum's personal life, education and professional life. The Batya Weinbaum papers are arranged into the following thirteen series: Legal, Correspondence, Press, Activities, Research and Scholarship, Art, Writing, Teaching, Photography, Print Materials, Journals, Family Memorabilia and Audiovisual Materials.

The first series largely documents Weinbuam's lawsuit against Cleveland State University from 2004-2006. The second series contains correspondence primarily related to Weinbaim's teaching and publications, but also has personal correspondence and letters she exchanged with influential figures in various fields such as contemporary American literature, multiculturalism, women's studies, poetry, music composition and education. The third and fourth series include press and reviews related to Weinbaum's personal writings and artwork, as well as items associated with workshops, speaking engagements and other activities given or attended by Weinbaum. The next four series contain substantial materials related to Weinbaum's writing and research, including: drafts of her books, poetry, academic publications, artwork, music and materials related to editing and publishing the journal FemSpec. The Teaching series also encompasses syllabi and course materials used during Weinbaum's time as a graduate student instructor and as a professional at Cleveland State University and Pacifica Graduate Institute.

The collection also includes an extensive Photography series, with photographs/negatives Weinbaum took professionally as a documentary photographer in South America and Mexico; fieldwork in China and Israel, as well as family photo albums and scrapbooks. The eleventh series contains several decades of journals, notebooks and sketchbooks. The Family Memorabilia series documents Weinbaum's relationship with her daughter, Ola Liota Weinbaum. The Audiovisual Materials series has electronic files in a variety of formats including: floppy discs, cassettes, CD-ROMs, DVD-ROMs and VHS tapes. These files encompass Weinbaum's writing and material related to FemSpec. The contents of Weinbuam's hard drive are also described throughout the series where appropriate. Where possible, Weinbuam's original folder titles and descriptions have been retained.

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Bertha "B" Holt papers, 1940-2010 5.5 Linear Feet — 3425 items

Bertha "B" Holt is a longtime resident of Burlington, North Carolina. She was first appointed to the N.C. House of Representatives in 1975 and later won re-election eight times. Collection includes campaign materials; correspondence, 1977-2000s; and research materials from various bills and issues from Holt's career. Other files relate to Holt's activities, including the Women's Forum of North Carolina, North Carolina Legislative Women's Caucus; the State Council for Social Legislation; the Science and Technology Board; tribute dinners and awards; clippings; a scrapbooks; and other miscellaneous papers and letters. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0097) (1650 items; 2.7 lin. ft.; dated 1970s-2008) includes campaign materials; correspondence, 1977-2000s; and research materials from various bills and issues from Holt's career, including the ERA, marital rape, wine laws, the lottery, juvenile justice, nursing, health education, mental retardation, archaeology, domestic violence, hospice, and the Holocaust. Other files relate to Holt's legislative career, including the North Carolina Legislative Women's Caucus; the State Council for Social Legislation; tribute dinners and awards; and other miscellaneous papers and letters.

Accession (2010-0104) (750 items; 1.3 lin. ft.; dated 1970-2010) includes clippings; correspondence; subject and research files from issues such as churches, seatbelt and school bus safety, welfare, gun control, and wine; committee materials, including the Science and Technology Board; a scrapbook from 1973-1979; and other miscellaneous materials.

Accession (2010-0192) (1125 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1940-2007) includes subject and research files from issues such as healthcare, education, crime, and prisons; materials from the Equal Rights Amendment; files from various events that Holt attended, including the Center for Creative Leadership, the White House Conference on Aging (1981), and files from her membership in the Women's Forum of North Carolina. Also contains materials from her Episcopal Church activities.

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Betsy Gamble Hansen was an author and Duke University alumna. In 2000, she founded the Oglethorpe University Women's Network, and she belonged to Duke University's Council on Women's Studies for three years. The Betsy Gamble Hansen Papers include drafts of and papers related to Gamble's writings, especially related to her book, Portals, Menzies family correspondence, clippings, and other papers. Materials range in date from 1902 to 2003, with the bulk being from 1902-1960 and 1996-2003.

The Betsy Gamble Hansen papers are organized into two series. The Writings series includes drafts of Hansen's 2003 novel Portals, iterations of which existed under the titles A Communion of Saints, A Gathering of Saints and Sinners, The Hawk and the Myna Bird, and Tapestry Tales. Also included in this series are papers related to the publication of the book, including publishing contracts, typeface samples, prospectuses, copyright forms, and estimates. The Menzies Family correspondence and other papers series contains letters received by Hansen's grandmother, E.B. Menzies, of Hickory, North Carolina, and her immediate family, clippings, and other papers. The bulk of the correspondence in this series was written by Menzies's sons, Bruce, George, and Tom Menzies, and her daughters Mary Stuart Menzies Tarrant and Jane Menzies Gamble (Betsy Gamble Hansen's mother). Other frequent correspondents include Tom's wife, Frances Menzies, and George's wife, Betty Menzies. Also included are birthday cards, Christmas cards, and letters for E.B. Menzies from friends. Two folders labeled "Family Correspondence" consist of correspondence between E.B. Menzies's children and their spouses. Peppered throughout these folders are letters from E.B. Menzie's grandchildren, including Betsy Gamble Hansen.

Mrs. E. B. Menzies was born Reesie Tipton Warren in 1880 in Emory, Virignia and died in 1961. She lived most of her life in Hickory, NC. She married Edward Bruce Menzies in 1902, and they remained together until Edward died in 1924. Most of the pre-1930 correspondence in the collection consists of letters from E.B. Menzies's extended family and a few letters from her children while away at camp. The children wrote infrequently in the 1930s. During this time Tom, George, and Bruce traveled across the country from their hometown of Hickory, North Carolina, in search of work, while Jane and Mary Stuart remained at home. From 1932-1935, the three men each attended the Colorado School of Mines and performed construction work for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) project to build the Hoover Dam, then held temporary jobs in several different cities before settling in California. Tom and Bruce attended college while George appears to have continued working.

During World War II, each of E.B. Menzies's sons enlisted as United States Navy Seabees in the Pacific Theater, and began to write home much more frequently. Tom graduated in 1942 and was immediately subject to the draft, while Bruce and George began service several months later. None of the three men appear to have seen much conflict, and each survived the war unharmed, although Bruce did stay in a Navy Hospital for some time, apparently due to a stomach illness. Jane and Mary Stuart kept in frequent contact with their brothers throughout the war. All three men were discharged by 1945.

In the late 1940s and 1950s, each of E.B. Menzies's sons settled in California with their wives and children. George began working for a rail line, Tom took a job at a mill, and Bruce sold insurance. E.B. Menzies moved to California to teach for two years before moving back to North Carolina. Each of her children kept in regular correspondence with her throughout the 1950s, but the letters stop in 1961, when E.B. Menzies died.

In addition to the correspondence in this series, this series contains clippings and other papers compiled by E.B. Menzies, including a small amount of financial papers, prescriptions, and materials relating to her children.

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Photojournalist who documented the women's movement and associated human rights issues since the 1960s. The photographs in the collection date from 1959 to 2007, with the bulk taken by Lane in the 1970s and 1980s. Subjects focus largely on events and individuals. Events include consciousness raising groups, planning meetings, and local women's conferences. Large events include Equal Rights Amendment demonstrations, and International Women's Year and National Organization for Women conferences and marches, in major cities such as New York City, Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Houston. Other events folders document Pro-Choice rallies and protests addressing harassment, sexism, and violence towards women. Another large series documents women involved in the movement, from feminist leaders to event attendees and coordinators. Subject folder photographs are of women at work, women athletes, men for women's rights, and events relating to daycare, feminist slogans and signs, lesbian rights, opposition, women of color, sexist images, and sexual health. Smaller sets of images document protests against war, pornography, and nuclear power. The collection also includes photographs of Bettye Lane and her original inventory sheets. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Bettye Lane photographs date from 1959 to 2007, with the bulk taken in the 1970s and 1980s. Subjects focus largely on events and individuals. Events include consciousness raising groups, planning meetings, and local women's conferences. Large events include Equal Rights Amendment demonstrations, and International Women's Year and National Organization for Women conferences and marches, in major cities such as New York City, Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Houston. Other events folders document Pro-Choice rallies and protests addressing harassment, sexism, and violence towards women. Another large series documents women involved in the movement, from feminist leaders to event attendees and coordinators. Subject folder photographs are of women at work, women athletes, men for women's rights, and events relating to daycare, feminist slogans and signs, lesbian rights, opposition, women of color, sexist images, and sexual health. Smaller sets of images document protests against war, pornography, and nuclear power. The collection also includes a folder of photographs of Bettye Lane spanning her career.

The photographs are arranged into three series, Events, People, and Subjects, with subdivisions in alphabetical order, and the prints within in date or alphabetical order. The original order as assembled by Lane is for the most part intact, with folder titles deriving from the original headings. Included in each folder are her original annotated inventory sheets, which include dates, photo identification codes, and titles.

Almost all the prints are unmounted black-and-white gelatin silver process prints, with some color photographs scattered throughout, and a few digital prints from the 2000s. The larger prints all have detailed information on the backs, many giving names of individuals present, details on the events, and contextual notes. There are also a few photocopies scattered throughout. There are some duplicate images or cropped versions. The most typical sizes are 8x10 and 6 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches, with some snapshots found in a few folders.

There is some overlap with Bettye Lane images in other U.S. institutional collections, noted below, but many of the images at Duke University are unique.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Bill Brown is a filmmaker, photographer, and zinester from Lubbock, Texas. His films explore the landscapes of North America, including the United States–Mexico border, North Dakota missile silos, and the Trans-Canada Highway, and have been exhibited at film festivals and museums around the world. He received a BFA from Harvard in 1992 and a MFA from CalArts in 1997. Brown is the author of a zine called Dream Whip as well as a novel on the underground in L.A., Saugus to the Sea. In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

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This collection consists of zines, primarily authored by women, acquired as donations from multiple collectors or purchased from book stores, zine fairs, and zine distributors. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

This collection consists of zines, primarily authored by women, acquired as donations from multiple collectors or purchased from book stores, zine fairs, and zine distributors. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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In 1996, Bitch: Feminst Response to Pop Culture was created by Lisa Jervis, Benjamin Shaykin, and Andi Zeisler. After having a hard time finding critiques of sexism in pop culture in magazines and self published zines, they decided to make their own. Their goals are to write about sexism in pop culture, propose alternatives, and promote pop products that are pro-woman and pro-feminism. Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Blackwell family papers, 1845-1976 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 136 items

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to Blackwell family members from other family members; including Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to from other family members to Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

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Bonnie Lee Black papers, 1981-2015 36 Linear Feet — 23 boxes (numbering skips 18)

Bonnie Lee Black is a writer, editor, writing teacher, and chef who has worked both domestically and internationally. The collection centers primarily on her work as a writer, as a member of the Peace Corps in Gabon, as a professor in New Mexico, and as the creator of an economic development project in Mali aimed at teaching local seamstresses the art of patchwork quilt-making.

The Bonnie Lee Black papers comprise personal correspondence, materials from her time working in Mali, teaching materials from her time as a professor at the University of New Mexico-Taos, documents from her experience in the Peace Corps in Gabon and Mali, and materials generated from two of her books, How to Make an African Quilt and How to Cook a Crocodile.

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Collection contains fourteen broadsides and handbills from British women's suffrage societies, primarily the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, but including the Conservative and Unionist Women's Franchise Association and the London Society for Women's Suffrage, as well as one handbill from the Cambridge Daily News. Two broadsides announce suffragist marches, including one in support of women's military service during World War I. Several handbills provide general information on women's suffrage and suffrage societies, others are intended for specific audiences, including working and affluent women. Other topics include protests against use of violence in the suffragist cause, the Conciliation Bill for Women's Suffrage, and positions of various elected officials on the issue. The back of one broadside holds a handwritten excerpt from an unrelated drama.

Collection contains fourteen broadsides and handbills from British women's suffrage societies, primarily the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, but including the Conservative and Unionist Women's Franchise Association and the London Society for Women's Suffrage, as well as one handbill from the Cambridge Daily News. Two broadsides announce suffragist marches, including one in support of women's military service during World War I. Several handbills provide general information on women's suffrage and suffrage societies, others are intended for specific audiences, including working and affluent women. Other topics include protests against use of violence in the suffragist cause, the Conciliation Bill for Women's Suffrage, and positions of various elected officials on the issue. The back of one broadside holds a handwritten excerpt from an unrelated drama.

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This collection documents the work of the Durham, NC environmental artist Bryant Holsenbeck. It contains materials collected over the course of her career, including media clippings, publicity, photographs, and a portfolio.

This collection includes gallery materials, correspondence, postcards, publicity materials, exhibit posters, clippings about Bryant Holsenbeck, documentation of Holsenbeck's work, photographs, a DVD production about Holsenbeck, and an art portfolio.

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Carrie F. Young papers, 1872-1894 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 21 items

Carrie F. Young was one of the first advocates of women's suffrage in California, and was an activist for other political causes. Young eventually became a physician, the first woman to receive a medical diploma in California, from the Oakland College of Medicine in 1884. Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials.

Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials. There is a letter regarding political matters and a typescript page of general instructions for an unnamed convention, both written by Young's son, Robert E. Bush; a recommendation for Young's work on national campaigns as a Republican poltical activist and speaker, dated 1889; two advertisements for a Mrs. Dr. Tarbell's treatments of "nervous diseases and female complaints;" two pages of guidelines for a populist club; one of Young's calling cards; and an enclosure for the California Medical Journal. There is also a brochure for "photographic fern-leaf mottoes." In addition, there are 8 flyers, handbills, and broadsides, all advertising political speeches (especially for the People's Party), lectures, or medical work by Young, except for two that advertise speeches by Mrs. M. S. Singer of Chicago, and Dr. J. V. C. Smith. Collection also includes issues of the serials Life Crystals (March 1882, no. 3), edited by Young, and Pacific Journal of Health (January-September 1872, nos. 1-9), published by Young.

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Lesbian feminist writer and magazine publisher, resident of Durham (Durham Co.), N.C.; co-founder of SINISTER WISDOM, a multicultural lesbian literary and art journal. The Catherine Nicholson papers contain materials dating from 1897 to 2005, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1974 to 2005. Materials in the collection primarily document Nicholson's directing and theatre related activities, her work on Sinister Wisdom, and her membership in the group Old Lesbians Organizing for Change (OLOC). The collection comprises correspondence; personal and professional writings and supporting materials; photographic materials; publicity about theatre and of plays directed by Nicholson; audio recordings; and ephemera. Included are play scripts written by Catherine Nicholson and other playwrights, and scripts with directorial annotations by Nicholson.

The Catherine Nicholson papers contain materials dating from 1897 to 2005, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1974 to 2005. Materials in the collection primarily document Nicholson's directing and theatre related activities, her work on Sinister Wisdom, and her membership in the group Old Lesbians Organizing for Change (OLOC). The collection comprises correspondence with family and friends; personal and professional writings; poetry; notes; clippings; photographic materials, including black and white and color photographs, color slides, and a cabinet card; audio cassettes; vinyl records; press kits and playbills; reviews about theatre and of plays directed by Nicholson; and ephemera. Included are play scripts written by Catherine Nicholson and other playwrights, and scripts with directorial annotations by Nicholson. The collection contains correspondence, artwork, journals, and receipts related to the publishing of Sinister Wisdom. In addition, the collection houses Nicholson's collection of audiocassettes and long-playing vinyl records, with the majority of albums related to women's music; many of these were published by Olivia Records. Printed materials have been removed and added to the Women and LGBT Rights Periodicals Collection. Use copies of audio recordings will need to be created before items can be accessed by researchers. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2010-0068) (28 items, .1 lin. ft.; dated 1984-1985 and undated) comprises letters and cards addressed to Harriet Ellenberger, primarily from Susan Thompson.

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Celeste Wesson is a radio producer and Duke University graduate. These papers document her work with the Women's Radio Collective of WDBS, Duke's campus radio station.

Collection consists of materials documenting the work of the WDBS Women's Radio Collective, including meeting minutes, programming and how-to guides, and materials aimed at addressing the needs of women in radio production.

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The Center for Women Policy Studies was founded in 1972 as the nation’s first feminist policy analysis, research and advocacy institution. Collection documents the day-to-day operation, programs, and mission of the Center for Women's Policy Studies. The records include subject files, research files, publication materials, lectures, project documentation, program files, surveys, survey data and chronological files accumulated by the organization. Topics include women and AIDS, girls, teenage girls, work/life balance, women and violence, women and leadership, women and bio ethics and reproductive rights. The collection includes audio cassettes and VHS tapes, and patrons must request use copies to access the content of these materials. Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

This collection (2010-094)(147375 items, dated 1970-2005) documents the day-to-day operation, programs, and mission of the Center for Women Policy Studies and was accumulated by the organization throughout its history. Materials range in date from 1970-2012.

Topics covered include equal credit opportunity, educational equity, violence against women and girls, welfare reform, work/family balancing and workplace diversity policies, reproductive rights and health, the women’s HIV/AIDS epidemic and access to health care for low income women. The collection contains many speeches and articles by President Leslie R. Wolfe.

This addition (2012-0239)(41625 items, dated 1975-2009) continues to document the Center's activities. Materials include program files, development files, administrative documentation, and publications.

This addition (2013-0067)(20250 items, dated 1979-2012) covers more recent activities of the organization as well as some earlier materials not included in previous accessions. Materials include program files, publicity and fund raising files, publications, and project documentation.

This addition (2013-0137)(5625 items, dated 1975-2012) includes program files and publications from director Leslie R. Wolfe's office, mostly documenting the most recent activities of the Center.

The addition (2015-0192)(43.5 linear ft., dated 1953-2012) includes files documenting the programmatic and administrative activities of the Center, as well as photographs.

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Charles Nordhoff (31 August 1830 - 14 July 1901) was an American journalist, descriptive and miscellaneous writer. Collection comprises a private autograph letter, signed, that Charles Nordhoff wrote to William C. Russel, acting president of Cornell University, in 1881.

Collection comprises a private autograph letter, signed, that Charles Nordhoff wrote to William C. Russel, acting president of Cornell University, in 1881. The topic of the letter is Russel's stand against Henry Ward Beecher; Nordhoff writes "to send you my congratulations & hearty good wishes, as the manly stand you have taken in [regard?] to Mr. Beecher. I am sorry that you should be made to suffer for doing what I believe was your most solemn & imperative duty as the guardian of [illegible] men & women...."

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Collection comprises a autographed letter (4 pgs., 19 cm x 23 cm) written by Charlotte Brontë to her lifelong friend Ellen Nussey on 1840 November 12, possibly from Yorkshire. Pages also hold sketches of her and of a horse head created by William Weightman (1814-1842), who was assistant curate to Patrick Brontë beginning in 1839. Topics include Weightman’s drawings; an invitation to her to provide entertainment; procuring students for a local school; and the abusive and dissolving relationship between Mr. Collins, who was a curate, and his wife. Includes Brontë’s negative assessment of Mr. Collins’ character. Collection includes a typescript transcription of the letter.

Collection comprises a autographed letter (4 pgs., 19 cm x 23 cm) written by Charlotte Brontë to her lifelong friend Ellen Nussey on 1840 November 12, possibly from Yorkshire. Pages also hold sketches of her and of a horse head created by William Weightman (1814-1842), who was assistant curate to Patrick Brontë beginning in 1839. Topics include Weightman’s drawings; an invitation to her to provide entertainment; procuring students for a local school; and the abusive and dissolving relationship between Mr. Collins, who was a curate, and his wife. Includes Brontë’s negative assessment of Mr. Collins’ character. Collection includes a typescript transcription of the letter.

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Charlotte Brontë needlepoint flower study, approximately 1840 0.9 Linear Feet — canvas, thread — ;frame 25 cm, 31 cm, 2 cm

Decorative needlepoint flower study on a cream background, possibly worked in wool thread, of a white lily at top, with light pink accents on leaves and blue stamen, surrounded by five green and blue-green leaves. At lower left is a deep pink peony with white accents, surrounded by three green and brown leaves with veins in brown and blue. At lower right is a red carnation, with pink and brown petal edges. It is surrounded by a carnation bud, and two green leaves with veins in brown and blue. Brontë completed the piece around 1840. It was placed underneath a green velvet mat with oval center opening measuring 11 x 14 cm, then enclosed in a wooden frame 25 x 31 cm, which was painted gold, then "antiqued" on three sides. In hand-painted black lettering on gold paint at the bottom of the frame appears the statement, "Sampler by Charlotte Bronte," although the work is not a sampler.

Decorative needlepoint flower study on a cream background, possibly worked in wool thread, of a white lily at top, with light pink accents on leaves and blue stamen, surrounded by five green and blue-green leaves. At lower left is a deep pink peony with white accents, surrounded by three green and brown leaves with veins in brown and blue. At lower right is a red carnation, with pink and brown petal edges. It is surrounded by a carnation bud, and two green leaves with veins in brown and blue. Brontë completed the piece around 1840. It was placed underneath a green velvet mat with oval center opening measuring 11 x 14 cm, then enclosed in a wooden frame 25 x 31 cm, which was painted gold, then "antiqued" on three sides. In hand-painted black lettering on gold paint at the bottom of the frame appears the statement, "Sampler by Charlotte Bronte," although the work is not a sampler.

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Physician's account ledger and assorted papers from Dr. Charlotte Evans Page, a physician practicing in Lowell, Massachusetts, in the 1880s and 1890s.

Physician's account ledger with entries dating from 1884 through 1899, and miscellaneous correspondence and financial papers related to Page's family history and operations of her medical practice.

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Chevalier d'Eon papers, 1778-1779 1.0 Linear Foot — 8 items

Charles Geneviève Louis Auguste André Timothée d'Eon de Beaumont, known as Chevalier d'Eon, was a French diplomat, spy, freemason and soldier who fought in the Seven Years' War. Collection comprises a dossier of seven items (approximately 75 pages) compiled by Chevalier d'Eon articulating his wish to forsake his female persona in order to fight in the American Revolutionary War.

Collection comprises a dossier of seven items (approximately 75 pages) compiled by Chevalier d'Eon articulating his wish to forsake his female persona in order to fight in the American Revolutionary War. The seven items are wrapped in a blue paste-paper wrapper. The first item is a collection of 35 commissions and supporting documents from diplomats, military officers and French, Russian or English ministers, testifying to Eon's qualities and his activity in the secret services for 20 years, including the peace mission to the court of Russia (1755-1756); a mission to Vienna carrying the campaign plan of the Russian army and revelation of a secret Russian-Prussian correspondence, along with another mission to Russia (1757); commission as secretary of the French embassy at the court of Russia, after having contributed to the success of four treaties (1757-1759); commission as aide-de-camp of maréchal de Broglie in Germany (1760-1762); secretary of the French Embassy in Great Britain, for the conclusion of peace (1762); resident, then Minister Plenipotentiary in London (1763); refusal of proposals to communicate particulars and papers relative to the peace to the opponents of the court of St. James (1764-1765); followed by a Franco-British plan for the Mexican and Peruvian uprisings against Spain (1766-1768) for the Spanish ambassador in London; against the accusations of venality and corruption by the Court of France by the Princess of Wales and the English ministers (1769-1770); secret correspondence with Louis XV, the Prince de Conti, the Comte de Broglie, all ending in a promise of a life annuity from Louis XV.

The second item is a brief Memoire by d'Eon, dated 20 May 1778, for the Count of Vergennes, Minister for Foreign Affairs, in order to obtain payment of his pension, with a copy of 5 supporting documents. The third item is a memorandum describing the Chevalier's affairs in England, as of August 1778, including rents due on a house in Brewer Street/Golden Square, which is scheduled to be demolished. There are further details of d'Eon's state of affairs in France, where the Chevalier blames his feminine state and sedentariness as cause of a very painful rheumatism. D'Eon accordingly begs the King and his ministers to allow him to don men's clothes and fight.

Items four through seven are signed letters. One to M. de Miromesnil, Garde des Sceaux, Versailles 12 February 1779, with a copy of his petition to the King's special adviser, the Comte de Maurepas, of the 8th of February, asking support for the Chevalier's request to serve as a volunteer in the Comte d'Orvilliers' fleet. The other two letters are written to the Comtesse de Maurepas, Versailles 12 February 1779, with a copy of the Chevalier's petition to the comte, 8 February, requesting the comte's protection.

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Chris Kraus is a writer and filmmaker who is also the co-editor of the press Semiotext(e). In 2017, she published After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography (Semiotext(e), 2017). This collection is comprised of the materials she created or amassed in the process of writing that book.

The Chris Kraus Collection of Kathy Acker papers is comprised of materials Kraus created or amassed in the process of writing her biography of Kathy Acker, After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography (Semiotext(e), 2017). The collection includes emails between Kraus and Acker's friends and colleagues; copies of manuscript material (primarily letters) from Acker gathered by Kraus from research libraries and private collections (very few of which duplicate materials in the Kathy Acker papers held by Duke) ; audio recordings of interviews between Kraus and Acker's associates, accompanied by transcriptions; Kraus's research notes, compiled quotes, and other research materials; collected press and reviews of Acker's work; typescripts and published works by and about Acker; Acker's financial records pertaining to expenditures, earnings, inheritances, and real estate; chapter drafts of Kraus's book; and a small amount of print ephemera and original photographs.

Interviewees and correspondents include: Lynne Tillman, Dennis Cooper, Gary Pulsifer, Amy Scholder, Neil Gaiman, Janey Smith, Dodie Bellamy, Robert Gluck, Stuart Home, P. Adams Sitney, Alan Sondheim, Eleanor Antin, Martha Rosler, and many others.

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Christina Rossetti letter, 1881 December 17 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection consists of a single letter from the Pre-Raphealite poet Christina Rossetti to an unnamed recipient in the publishing industry. She grants him permission to use poems from three of her published collections in an upcoming "Fine Art Book for Christmas 1882." Rossetti states that there should be no variation of the text from the source material, and that she chose those three collections because she personally holds their copyright.

Collection consists of an autograph manuscript letter signed Christina G. Rossetti, granting the unnamed recipient, presumably a publisher, permission to reprint some of her poems. The letter is written on a single folded sheet of paper with text on two pages. She lists her address as: 30 Torrington Square - London - W.C. Rossetti refers to the correspondent's "assurance that no variation whatsoever" will appear in "your Fine Art book for Xmas 1882." Rossetti names three of her books he may use as source material: "Poems," "Pageant," and "Sing Song." She writes, "I name these, because not every piece to be found elsewhere is in every instance of my own copyright."

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Clarissa Sligh papers, 1950-2010 70 Linear Feet — 51307 Items

Artist and author of works such as Wrongly Bodied, Reading Dick and Jane with Me, What's Happening With Momma? Jake in Transition, and It Wasn't Little Rock. Collection includes materials relating to Sligh's career as an artist, with particular focus on her various projects and exhibitions in the 1980s, 1990s, and early 2000s. Projects represented include Jake In Transition/Wrongly Bodied, Witness to Dissent/It Wasn't Little Rock, Coast to Coast, Sandy Ground, Malcolm X: Man, Ideal, Icon, What's Happening With Momma? and an NC Reunion/Slavery project, along with several others. Sligh's files frequently include correspondence, research materials, drafts of essays and exhibition plans, clippings and other source materials, contact sheets and slides, and occasionally exhibit pieces and texts from the actual installation. Other items included in the collection are exhibition binders and scrapbooks kept by Sligh to document her career; correspondence and communication between Sligh and other artists, galleries, or publishers; catalogs and publicity materials from Sligh's many exhibitions, shows, and publications, artists' books, materials documenting Sligh's art and process, large framed photographic prints; and other materials. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Clarissa Sligh Papers have been divided into 8 series: Binders and Catalogs, Projects, Correspondence, Journals and Notepads, Photographs, and Artists' Book Dummies and Drafts, Jake in Transition, and Accession 2013-0149.

The Binders and Catalogs series includes a selection of exhibition binders, kept and collected by Sligh as a record of her various projects, events, and exhibits. Also includes press clippings, museum catalogs, and other programming materials. Items have been removed from their original binders.

The Projects series includes files from many of Sligh's art and research projects, relating to a variety of topics such as slavery, civil rights, genealogy, gender studies, and African American history. A "project" may include materials from an installation, artist book, exhibit, or all of these formats. Sligh's work frequently evolved over time and expanded in scope and format. This series also includes files from Sligh's exhibitions and publications. Major projects documented include: NC Reunion and Slavery Project, a film related to the Artists' Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, Jake in Transition/Wrongly Bodied, Coast to Coast, Witness to Dissent, Sandy Ground, and Malcolm X: Man, Ideal, Icon.

The Correspondence Series contains three subseries of correspondence: the first has been sorted in loose chronological order according to Sligh's own folder arrangements; the second contains Sligh's self-designated "to do," "answered," "unanswered," and other unsorted correspondence; the third has files that are arranged alphabetically by subject or correspondent's name.

The Journals and Notepads Series includes a set of legal notepads kept by Sligh during the late 1990s. Many entries related to her work on Jake in Transition, but the journals also include Sligh's discussions and reflections on other projects and artwork.

The Photographs Series includes images of artwork and installations by Sligh, portraits of Sligh, and portraits and snapshots of family and friends.

The Artists Books Dummies and Drafts Series includes mockups and drafts from the production of Wrongly Bodied; It Wasn't Little Rock; Malcolm X; Reading Dick and Jane with Me (including "Play with Jane" print); What's Happening with Momma? and alternate version of this book called Girlchild; Hiroshima, Hopes and Dreams; and Voyage(r): Tourist Map to Japan.

The Jake in Transition series consists of photographic prints.

Accession 2012-0149 is an addition consisting of Sligh's documentation of her work and process, photographs and negatives, large screen prints, and political posters.

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Claudia Horwitz papers, 1988-2013 8.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Collection contains personal and professional papers of Claudia Horwitz, a Chapel Hill spiritual activist, author, and founder of Stone Circles.

Collection includes, but is not limited to writings, research and subject files, project files, talks/speeches, and files documenting group work.

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Single, typescript letter dated 1900 January 4. The journalist, editor, collector, and Brontë expert Clement Shorter writes to thank Mrs. F.L.E. Bellfield for a book which he found helpful for his research. Shorter was in the process of editing a new edition of Elizabeth Gaskell's Life of Charlotte Brontë, originally published in 1899. Also mentioned is a forthcoming new edition of The Life of Charlotte Brontë and her sisters, edited by Mrs. Ward Humphry.

The collection consists of a single page typescript letter dated 1900 January 4 on The Sphere newspaper's letterhead. Clement Shorter writes to Mrs. F.L.E. Bellfield to thank her for giving him a book which he found helpful in his preparation for a new edition of Elizabeth Gaskell's Life of Charlotte Brontë that he was in the process of editing. The letter also mentions a forthcoming new edition published by Smith & Elder of The Life and Works of Charlotte Brontë, edited by Mrs. Ward Humphry and with an introduction by Shorter.

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Lesbian feminist choral group established in the Durham-Raleigh-Chapel Hill area (N.C.) in 1983. The Common Woman Chorus records contain material dating from 1985 to 2010. The records primarily comprise sheet music, concert programs, publicity, correspondence, and administrative records. Although the records contain mostly print material, they also include some color photographs, audiocassettes, videos, electronic word documents, t-shirts, and sweatshirts. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Common Woman Chorus records contain material dating from 1985 to 2015 relating to the group's musical and fund-raising activities. The records primarily comprise sheet music, concert programs, publicity, correspondence, and administrative records. Although the records contain mostly print material, a few color photographs, audiocassettes, videos, electronic word documents, t-shirts, and sweathirts are also included. Use copies of original audiovisual recordings will need to be created before items can be accessed by researchers. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Collection comprises a letter from "C.H.H" to a colleague, regarding an ongoing Conn. trial in an abortion case involving "Mrs. Green," "Gen. Walker," and "Mr. Mitchell." Abortion was legal in Conn. until 1821, when it became the first state to explicitly outlaw the practice. The text includes: "Mrs. Green began to testify on Friday night--but was taken sick & had to be sent home. That she was really sick, there can be no doubt. But whether it was the journey &c. or agitation & excitement as to what she was required to testify--is still a mystery. I want you to send me her history & that of her family ... so as to shape our cross examination.... She is expected to testify that the abortion matter was all gotten up by Genl W--without there being any truth in it--She began by saying that Genl W. called on her at Naugatuck [Conn.].... Then [abbr. "said"?] that Gen Walker had been speaking ill of his daughter & also one of hers. That he Walker had [abbr. "said"?] that he had given medicine to produce abortion....They are going to destroy Genl W's testimony--by all kinds of evidence contradicting him--if they possibly can."

Collection comprises a letter from "C.H.H" to a colleague, regarding an ongoing Conn. trial in an abortion case involving "Mrs. Green," "Gen. Walker," and "Mr. Mitchell." Abortion was legal in Conn. until 1821, when it became the first state to explicitly outlaw the practice. The text includes: "Mrs. Green began to testify on Friday night--but was taken sick & had to be sent home. That she was really sick, there can be no doubt. But whether it was the journey &c. or agitation & excitement as to what she was required to testify--is still a mystery. I want you to send me her history & that of her family ... so as to shape our cross examination.... She is expected to testify that the abortion matter was all gotten up by Genl W--without there being any truth in it--She began by saying that Genl W. called on her at Naugatuck [Conn.].... Then [abbr. "said"?] that Gen Walker had been speaking ill of his daughter & also one of hers. That he Walker had [abbr. "said"?] that he had given medicine to produce abortion....They are going to destroy Genl W's testimony--by all kinds of evidence contradicting him--if they possibly can."

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Lady Elizabeth Holford was born Elizabeth Lewis around 1650. She first married a merchant called Harbin, whose wealth she inherited. Her second husband was a poor baronet, Sir William Holford, who died before her. Lady Holford died on 3 November 1720, without an heir. Collection comprises a handwritten manuscript copy (70 pages; incomplete, the text ends mid-sentence) of Lady Holford's will and codicils, created around 1720, following her death. In the will, large sums of money are bequeathed to several Oxford colleges, including Christ Church, Pembroke and Worcester Colleges, and Hart Hall, along with Charterhouse School. There are also lesser legacies made to various London charity schools, along with other amounts left to individuals.

Collection comprises a handwritten manuscript copy (70 pages; incomplete, the text ends mid-sentence) of Lady Holford's will and codicils, created around 1720, following her death. In the will, large sums of money are bequeathed to several Oxford colleges, including Christ Church, Pembroke and Worcester Colleges, and Hart Hall, along with Charterhouse School. There are also lesser legacies made to various London charity schools, along with other amounts left to individuals.

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Consists of 75 trade samples and sachets of cosmetics, powders, makeup, soaps and scented paraphernalia. Companies are primarily based in the United States, but Canadian and French perfumers are also represented, including Andrew Jergens, California Perfume (later Avon), Colgate, Frederick Ingram, Furst-McNess, Johnson & Johnson, Larkin, Lehn & Fink and Richard Hudnut. Poems and testimonials on packaging from Ethel Barrymore, Kate Greenaway, Mrs. Leslie Carter and Modjeska. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Consists of 75 trade samples and sachets of cosmetics, powders, makeup, soaps and scented paraphernalia. Companies are primarily based in the United States, but Canadian and French perfumers are also represented, including Andrew Jergens, California Perfume (later Avon), Colgate, Frederick Ingram, Furst-McNess, Johnson & Johnson, Larkin, Lehn & Fink and Richard Hudnut. Poems and testimonials on packaging from Ethel Barrymore, Kate Greenaway, Mrs. Leslie Carter and Modjeska. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Dan Kirsch papers, 1975-2004 19.1 Linear Feet — 10,840 Items

Activist, community organizer, and theater director. Executive director of Charlotte's Lesbian and Gay Community Center. He also founded One Voice, a gay, lesbian and gay-affirmative chorus in Charlotte, NC, and OutCharlotte, an annual cultural festival that celebrated LGBT culture through theater, dance, music, visual art, film and video. Collection documents the activities of Dan Kirsch and his work with various North Carolina gay and lesbian organizations. Organizations represented in the collection include One Voice, the N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride Board, PELAG, Time Out Youth, OutCharlotte, NC Pride, and The Lesbian and Gay Community Center of Charlotte.

Accession (2005-0037) (21 boxes) documents the activities of N.C. gay and lesbian organizations. Includes correspondence, newsletters, programs, flyers, and organizational material from One Voice; organizational material, correspondence, programs, invitations, minutes, registration records, financial records (bulk 1994) from Music & Message, the Gala Choruses Leadership Conference (Sept. 2-4, 1994 in Charlotte); correspondence, newsletters, clippings, financial records (1993-1996), minutes, and administrative records for the N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride Board; fund raising material for the AIDS fund raiser Heart Strings (June 15, 1992), and Pelag benefit Our Family Celebration (Oct. 12, 1991); and files, promotional materials, newsletters, clippings, minutes, and financial records about a N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride event, 1994. Also included are posters, t-shirts, 14 VHS video tapes, 1 CD-Rom, 50 photographs, and 25 slides.

Accession (2007-0079) (1600 items; 3 lin. ft.; dated 1991-2002) contains organization files and correspondence for Time Out Youth, an organization for lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth; financial and organizational files for OutCharlotte (1995-1998); NC Pride files; conference materials; and clippings from local publications including the Charlotte Observer, Creative Loafing, and The Leader. Also included are 2 CD-Rs containing audio clips of interviews, 15 Hi8 video cassettes, 9 VHS tapes, 4 audio cassettes, and photographs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0173) (2500 items; 3.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2004) includes materials from the planning and construction of The Lesbian and Gay Community Center in Charlotte, NC. Also includes The Center program files, administrative materials, board meeting minutes, publicity, and volunteer information.

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Author Dawn Langley Simmons had one of the first sex-reassignment surgeries in the United States. She was brought up as Gordon Langley Hall in England at Sissinghurst Castle, home of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, and adopted by the actress Margaret Rutherford. After surgery she assumed the identity Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, then became Dawn Langley Simmons after her marriage to John Paul Simmons. The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection includes material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Diane Weddington papers, 1970-2008 10.8 Linear Feet — 10,000 Items

Diane Weddington was a journalist and religion editor at the Contra Costa Times in the 1980s-1990s. Collection includes Weddington's published articles, research clippings, reporter notes, and other publications and materials from her journalism career. Topics represented include the gay and lesbian community in San Francisco, the ordination of women and gay clergy, the women's rights movement, domestic violence and child abuse, and other miscellaneous subjects.

The collection includes a variety of materials, ranging from Weddington's published articles to clippings of other articles used in her research. The coverage of the homosexual community in and around San Francisco is represented in two series; the first being Coverage of Gay Clergy in the Church. This series includes legal proceedings by the Lutheran Church against gay clergy, as well as Weddington's own reporter notebooks from her time covering the subject. A second series, Coverage of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Communities, includes materials from Weddington's involvement in the National Lesbian and Gay Journalist Association and the Frameline film festival. Also included in this series are coverage of the blackballing of gay and lesbian news by the Contra Costa Times, business directories from San Francisco, local gay pride events, and mainstream coverage of gays and lesbians in America.

The series on Weddington's Research, Clippings, and Reporting from Various Projects includes materials from her religion beat at the Contra Costa Times, as well as other internal correspondence and clippings from her work at the newspaper. Subjects include general women's news, as well as articles on domestic violence and rape, child abuse, Satanism, recovered memory phenomena, and women's rights. Also included in this series are materials from Weddington's many projects, including the War Tax Resistance campaign, Diablo Valley study groups and clubs, Journalists Exchange on Aging, and gardening. Finally, this series includes materials from Weddington's coverage of the visit of Pope John Paul II to San Francisco in 1987.

Women in the Church includes materials from Weddington's own involvement in the women's ordination movement in the Episcopal Church, as well as her clippings of coverage regarding women and religion during the 1970s-1980s. Also related and included in this series are Weddington's materials from her time as a student at the Divinity School at Duke University in the 1970s.

Weddington's Published Articles and Reporter's Notes appear to date largely from 1986-1992, although many articles and most of her notes are undated. These clippings from the Contra Costa Times along with news wires reveal the breadth of Weddington's journalism, with topics ranging from the religion section to breaking news about traffic accidents. The materials are not sorted or arranged in any way. Along with clippings and reporter's notebook pages, the series also includes some correspondence from readers, internal Contra Costa Times photography requests, press releases, and other miscellaneous pages used by Weddington in her work.

Finally, the Correspondence series includes both electronic (print-outs) and postal correspondence. One part of the series consists of dot matrix printer printouts of internal communications between the staff and management of the Contra Costa Times. Weddington writes that this material documents the bias against gays and lesbians, as well as the regular workflow of the newspaper in terms of scheduling reporters, meeting deadlines, internal gossip, and so on. Another portion of the series contains letters, greeting cards, and other personal and professional correspondence. These have been arranged by year but not sorted further.

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Donnamarie Mazzola papers, 1988-1995 3.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes

The Donnamarie Mazzola papers document feminist activism in Philadelphia in the 1980s-90s. The collection includes materials from training courses from various feminist coalitions working to end domestic and sexual violence against women, syllabi for Women Organized Against Rape trainings, materials from various Take Back the Night marches, clippings, and periodicals.

Collection documenting feminist activism in Philadelphia in the 1980s-90s, including materials from training courses from various feminist coalitions working to end domestic and sexual violence against women, syllabi for Women Organized Against Rape trainings, materials from various Take Back the Night marches, clippings, and periodicals.

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"Stewardess" aboard the ship; resident of Grimsby[?], England Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

All the entries in the piece indicate that Thompson was an experienced sailor and had navigational training, "Started work this morning. The ship's Log Book had been filled up last trip, and they couldn't get a new one at Rotterdam, so the entries for the last few days had been made on odd sheets of paper. I re-wrote these on official paper and.... Continued making all entries during the trip (pgs. 1-2)." The Tetela sailed from Southampton and arrived at Port Antonio, Jamaica, a fortnight later. Over the next week, the ship took on a large cargo of bananas at Montego Bay, Bowden, and Kingston, where five passengers joined the ship for the homeward voyage. The ship birthed at Garston Docks, Liverpool, two weeks later. In the journal, Thompson does not record what duties she carried out as stewardess. Instead, she recorded weather, passing ships, as well as sea life, but mainly focused on describing, with an active sense of humor, staff activities, meals, gossip, recreation, and teasing aboard ship. She also detailed a day trip she took to Port Antonio, the loading of bananas as cargo, as well as her contacts with officials of the United Fruit Company and family members of the ship's staff. The photographs document much of her description, but include several images of Thompson taken by the Tetela's captain.

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Collection comprises a certificate written by Fairfax stating that he examined Alsy (Alice), who was a slave being hired out to Charles Mothershead in Westmoreland Co., Va. He found that she had procidentia uteri (her entire uterus was outside the vagina), which caused her to be unable to work. He added, "She may be made useful by the application of an instrument properly adjusted, to keep the part from coming down."

Collection comprises a certificate written by Fairfax stating that he examined Alsy (Alice), who was a slave being hired out to Charles Mothershead in Westmoreland Co., Va. He found that she had procidentia uteri (her entire uterus was outside the vagina), which caused her to be unable to work. He added, "She may be made useful by the application of an instrument properly adjusted, to keep the part from coming down."

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Dwayne Dixon Zine collection, ca. 1984-ca. 1995 2.5 Linear Feet — 224 Items

Dwayne Dixon was an employee in the Literacy Through Photography program at the Center for Documentary Studies. Collection includes 110 zines (150 items, ca. 1984-ca. 1995) produced across the United States and Central America and collected by Dixon throughout the 1990s. The majority of the zines demonstrate young men's search for life meaning, morality, and identity, especially through hardcore and punk music/lifestyle, including interviews with bands, album reviews, and criticism of the status quo. Other groups of zines were produced by children participating in various afterschool and enrichment programs in Durham, NC; by Central American women in Mexico, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and El Salvador; and by American young women raging against rape and sexism and searching for a less traditional sexual identity. Many zines include erotica, drawings, copies of photographs, and cartoons.

110 zines (150 items, ca. 1984-ca. 1995) produced across the United States and Central America and collected by Dixon throughout the 1990s. The majority of the zines demonstrate young men's search for life meaning, morality, and identity, especially through hardcore and punk music/lifestyle, including interviews with bands, album reviews, and criticism of the status quo. Other groups of zines were produced by children participating in various afterschool and enrichment programs in Durham, NC; by Central American women in Mexico, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and El Salvador; and by American young women raging against rape and sexism and searching for a less traditional sexual identity. Many zines include erotica, drawings, copies of photographs, and cartoons. Online searchable database includes more detailed descriptions of the first accession of this collection. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Edith Sitwell poems, circa 1940-1950 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Dame Edith Sitwell was a British poet and critic whose work helped usher in the modernist era of British poetry. This autograph manuscript contains the text of two of her poems: "Lullaby" and "Serenade: From Any Man to Any Woman." Both poems were inspired by the early years of World War II and were published in her 1942 collection "Street Songs."

The five leaf holograph manuscript with text on the front side of each numbered page consists of two poems both titled at the top and signed "Edith" at the bottom. Both poems, "Lullaby," and "Serenade: Any Man to Any Woman" appeared in her 1942 collection "Street Songs." In this manuscript, "Serenade" is titled "Any Man to Any Woman." Both were inspired by the early years of World War II and are ironically titled. "Lullaby," sung by a baboon, describes a chaotic, primeval world destroyed by wartime chaos and despair in which, "All is equal - blindness, sight/There is no depth, there is no height." "Serenade" spoken by a dying soldier, regards his love through the lens of death and destruction. He identifies his love with a cannon and invites her to "die with me and be my love" in a reversal of the famous Marlowe line.

Both poems are referenced in the Edith Sitwell papers at the Ransom Humanities Center. Viewed March 9, 2017

Source: Misko, Ellen, "A Study of Dame Edith Sitwell's Later Poems: 1940-1945" (1972). Dissertations. Paper 1211. Viewed March 9, 2017

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Collection comprises Edith Wharton's corrected Italian manuscript (34 typed pages) for her short story, "La Duchessa in Preghiera" (The Duchess at Prayer), originally published in English in Scribner's Magazine, August 1900, then by Scribner's in the collection of her stories, "Crucial Instances," 1901. The corrections are in Italian and are in Wharton's own hand.

Collection comprises Edith Wharton's corrected Italian manuscript (34 typed pages) for her short story, "La Duchessa in Preghiera" (The Duchess at Prayer), originally published in English in Scribner's Magazine, August 1900, then by Scribner's in the collection of her stories, "Crucial Instances," 1901. The corrections are in Italian and are in Wharton's own hand.

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Eleanor "Elly" Elliott was a women's rights activist, a board member of NOW's Legal Defense and Education Fund, a Barnard College Board Member, served on the National Advisory Council on Women's Educational Programs and was an editor at Vogue magazine. These materials consist of personal papers from the Elliott family and administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities. It also includes photographs, scrapbooks and some audio/visual materials.

These papers consist of personal materials from the Elliott and Thomas families as well as administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities.

The collection includes some material regarding Elly's husband, Jock Elliott, former chairman of the Ogilvy and Mather advertising firm. Included in the Thomas family materials is a series on Eleanor's mother, Dorothy Q. Thomas. In the legal and financial papers series, there are materials pertaining to the divorce and child support matters of Elliott's brother, James A. Thomas Jr.

The collection contains scrapbooks and photographs, as well as reel-to-reel audiotapes that require reformatting before use.

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Eleanor Foa Dienstag is a feminist activist, writer, and corporate communications specialist. These materials document her professional life and include drafts of her writings, research on Renée Richards, media appearances, and materials related to the production of her books Whither Thou Goest and In Good Company.

Collection contains professional papers of Eleanor Foa Dienstag, feminist activist, author, journalist and corporate writer. Materials include Dienstag's writings and appearances in print media, a run of the Outsider's Newsletter, files related to books, Whither Thou Goest and In Good Company : 125 years at the Heinz table, 1869-1994, as well as files related to unfinished biography of transgender activist and tennis champion Renée Richards.

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Eleanor King, possibly of Liverpool, England. Commonplace book, 13 pages; 31 cm x 19 cm, dated 1781-1784, kept by Eleanor King. The book contains poems--some original, others attributed--interspersed with cooking and medicinal recipes. King typically signs her name and gives the dates with each entry. Recipes range from "Raison Wine," to "Sherif Cake," to her "Elixer of Health." One poem, possibly written by King, is devoted to the pleasures of breastfeeding and is titled: "On Seeing a Lady Nursing her own Child." The commonplace book once included several other pages which were cut away from the book at an early date.

Commonplace book, 13 pages; 31 cm x 19 cm, dated 1781-1784, kept by Eleanor King. The book contains poems--some original, others attributed--interspersed with cooking and medicinal recipes. King typically signs her name and gives the dates with each entry. Recipes range from "Raison Wine," to "Sherif Cake," to her "Elixer of Health." One poem, possibly written by King, is devoted to the pleasures of breastfeeding and is titled: "On Seeing a Lady Nursing her own Child." The commonplace book once included several other pages which were cut away from the book at an early date.

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Eleanor Vere Boyle (1825-1916) was an British artist of the Victorian era whose work consisted mainly of watercolor illustrations in children's books. Collection comprises an autograph letter, signed E. V. B., written by Boyle to Mr. [L?]awley on May 11, regarding payment for wine glasses and his portrait in the Pall Mall Magazine.

Collection comprises an autograph letter, signed E. V. B., written by Boyle to Mr. [L?]awley on May 11, regarding payment for wine glasses and his portrait in the Pall Mall Magazine. On her Huntercombe Manor, Maidenhead, letterhead.

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Eliza Beckwith appears to have been a student in 1860 at an unidentified normal college (a school created to train high school graduates to be teachers) in an English-speaking country, most likely Great Britain, Canada, or the United States. The collection consists of a single commonplace book with the name Eliza Beckwith or perhaps Eliza Beckwith Burton on the front cover. Twenty manuscript pages contain 30 poems and short phrases collected from college acquaintances, some with titles such as The Enquiry, Happiness, Remember Me, Prudent Simplicity, The Old and New Year, Friendship, and The Rights of Woman. A few of the poems are extracts taken from Tennyson and Wordsworth, but most appear to be original pieces from fellow students including Annie Kemball, Martha Ardley, Louisa Gillingham, Annie Morris, Helen Taylor, and Lizzie Capez. A few pieces are signed and dated College 1860, Christmas 1860, or Normal College.

The collection consists of a single commonplace book with the name Eliza Beckwith or perhaps Eliza Beckwith Burton on the front cover. Twenty manuscript pages contain 30 poems and short phrases collected from college acquaintances, some with titles such as "The Enquiry," "Happiness," "Remember Me," "Prudent Simplicity," "The Old and New Year," "Friendship," and "The Rights of Woman." A few of the poems are extracts taken from Tennyson and Wordsworth, but most appear to be original pieces from fellow students including Annie Kemball, Martha Ardley, Louisa Gillingham, Annie Morris, Helen Taylor, and Lizzie Capez. A few pieces are signed and dated "College 1860," "Christmas 1860," or "Normal College." Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Elizabeth Arden was a pioneering cosmetics entrepreneur. In this letter, she writes to advise a potential customer on matters relating to health and beauty. Arden advises her to get plenty of rest, eat a balanced diet, and to use products from Arden's Venetian line in order to soothe her chapped hands. Arden writes, "I know that where one is a busy housewife and has many duties in a country home, it is hard to get rest and relaxation. Perhaps you are of the naturally alert, quick, nervous type and use up a lot of energy everyday."

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter dated 1926 June 26 written by Elizabeth Arden to a Mrs. Hyatt, who had contacted her for advice after hearing her speak on the radio. Arden writes, "I know that where one is a busy housewife and has many duties in a country home, it is hard to get rest and relaxation. Perhaps you are of the naturally alert, quick, nervous type and use up a lot of energy everyday." Arden advises her to "get a little rest period at least once a day and relax in a quiet room or take a soothing, warm bath and a little nap," as well as to eat a healthy diet. She goes on to recommend products in her Venetian Preparations line that will soothe chapped hands, and encloses her booklet "The Quest of the Beautiful." On letterhead stationery from 673 Fifth Avenue embossed with the Venetian trademark.

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Collection contains three signed letters written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton to various correspondents. The first, dated [1880s] May 9 from New York, was written in response to a letter by a Miss Ives regarding a misunderstanding between them over articles or interviews written for The World and The Recorder; includes a transcription. In the second, dated 1881 April 26 from Tenafly, N.J., Stanton wrote to William Russel Dudley regarding his position, as well as her son Theodore's amicably-ended engagement to Miss White, daughter of Cornell University President Andrew Dickson White, and his plans to marry another. In the final letter, dated 1883 Dec. 10 from Geneva, N.Y., Stanton wrote to Courtland Palmer, declining an invitation address the first meeting of the Century Club, and regretting that she was not apprised in time to change her travel plans, as she had just returned from Europe; item is mounted.

Collection contains three signed letters written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton to various correspondents. The first, dated [1880s] May 9 from New York, was written in response to a letter by a Miss Ives regarding a misunderstanding between them over articles or interviews written for The World and The Recorder; includes a transcription. In the second, dated 1881 April 26 from Tenafly, N.J., Stanton wrote to William Russel Dudley regarding his position, as well as her son Theodore's amicably-ended engagement to Miss White, daughter of Cornell University President Andrew Dickson White, and his plans to marry another. In the final letter, dated 1883 Dec. 10 from Geneva, N.Y., Stanton wrote to Courtland Palmer, declining an invitation address the first meeting of the Century Club, and regretting that she was not apprised in time to change her travel plans, as she had just returned from Europe; item is mounted.

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Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz (December 5, 1822 – June 27, 1907) was an American educator, and the co-founder and first president of Radcliffe College. Collection comprises an autograph, signed letter Elizabeth Cary Agassiz wrote to Dr. Thomas Hill on January 20 [1886] regarding his article on her husband published in the Unitarian Review in December 1885. Also includes a printed photograph of her.

Collection comprises an autograph, signed letter Elizabeth Cary Agassiz wrote to Dr. Thomas Hill on January 20 [1886] regarding his article on her husband published in the Unitarian Review in December 1885. She notes that she was unable to follow his entire argument, "for the kingdoms of geometry are closed to me. But in reading it I am nonetheless conscious of a law which binds all things together...." Also includes a printed photograph of her.

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Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was a novelist and short-story writer. Collection contains a letter Elizabeth Gaskell wrote to Ellen Nussey on [1855] July 27 regarding her work on her biography of Charlotte Brontë, and making arrangements to meet with Nussey to review any letters "which you may think it right to entrust me with." She refers to having already reviewed letters held by Mr. Nichols, Brontë's husband, but never mentions Brontë by name.

Collection contains a letter Elizabeth Gaskell wrote to Ellen Nussey on [1855] July 27 regarding her work on her biography of Charlotte Brontë, and making arrangements to meet with Nussey to review any letters "which you may think it right to entrust me with." She refers to having already reviewed letters held by Mr. Nichols, Brontë's husband, but never mentions Brontë by name.

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Elizabeth Grosz papers, 1973-2016 13.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes

Professional papers of Elizabeth Grosz, professor in the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies Department at Duke University. Materials include her scholarly work, teaching files, and her students' work.

Professional papers of feminist philosopher, Elizabeth (Liz) Grosz: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Grosz. Materials encompass her scholarly work, including research files, manuscripts and typescripts of writings, publications, as well as student work, teaching files including syllabi, lecture notes, etc., and ephemera.

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Elizabeth Johnson Harris memoir, 1923 .1 Linear Feet — 22 x 35 cm. — Includes preservation photocopy and use photocopy

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85-page handwritten memoir supplemented with photographs and clippings documenting the personal and family history of poet and writer Elizabeth Johnson Harris of Augusta, GA, daughter of formerly enslaved parents. It includes her reflections on race relations, the place of African-Americans in society, as well as the importance of religion, education, and music in her life.

85-page handwritten manuscript in a bound notebook. It starts on the front side of the pages until the end of the notebook, where it continues from back to front on the backs of the pages. It covers her life in chronological order with the exception of some earlier stories recounted in later sections.

Harris divided the memoir into two sections: her childhood years and her life during and after her courtship and marriage. The manuscript also includes tipped in photographs and newsclippings. The photograph on the inside front cover above the dedication is an image of Johnson's adult daughter, Mattie Louise. The appendix contains the majority of the clippings, which consist of her poetry, several folk tales, and news stories about the Harris family.

The memoir describes Harris' childhood in Augusta, GA, race relations, her ambivalence about her place in society as an African-American, and the importance of religion and education in her life. She includes the story of her courtship and marriage, as well as descriptions of the adult lives of several of her children. Her son Charles Jacob Harris (1885-1988), was a classically trained pianist, composer, and teacher whose papers are also held by the Rubenstein Library.

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Resident of New England. Collection comprises a 1-page bill detailing the costs incurred by Elizabeth Parry during childbirth, including charges for a midwife; food and board; sugar, bread, spices, oatmeal and fruit; a "watch on fixed nights" and candles; the child's linen and clothing; two cords of firewood; a fire wood cutter; and two trips to Boston during the lying-in. Also includes the cost of "time spent to go to authority to make complaint of Edward Dix the father of my above[said] child." The bill is signed by Parry, and witnessed by John Phillips, Joseph Lynde, Jonas Bond, and Edward Emerson.

Collection comprises a 1-page bill detailing the costs incurred by Elizabeth Parry during childbirth, including charges for a midwife; food and board; sugar, bread, spices, oatmeal and fruit; a "watch on fixed nights" and candles; the child's linen and clothing; two cords of firewood; a fire wood cutter; and two trips to Boston during the lying-in. Also includes the cost of "time spent to go to authority to make complaint of Edward Dix the father of my above[said] child." The bill is signed by Parry, and witnessed by John Phillips, Joseph Lynde, Jonas Bond, and Edward Emerson.

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Harrogate College Union is the alumnae association for Harrogate Ladies' College in Harrogate, England. The Union was established in 1895. Elizabeth Wilhelmina Jones, or M. E. Jones, was headmistress of the school 1898-1935. Collection comprises materials related to a celebration, hosted by the college union in 1959, of Elizabeth Wilhelmina Jones' 90th birthday, along with items related to her memorial the following year.

Collection comprises materials related to a celebration, hosted by the college union in 1959, of Elizabeth Wilhelmina Jones' 90th birthday, along with items related to her memorial the following year. Includes two newspaper clippings regarding the birthday; a related luncheon invitation, menu, and college union pin; two items associated with her memorial service; and a notice regarding a memorial fund to be established in her name. In addition, there are three black-and-white photographs of the birthday luncheon and one color photograph of Jones. The rest of the collection items are mainly forms related to photographic orders.

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Collection comprises a full-color, four-page manuscript metamorphosis book, with verses and pen-and-watercolor illustrations by Elizabeth Winspear, who was possibly a resident of New England. Each page features two flaps that fold out in stages to reveal new illustrations. Characters include Adam and Eve, along with a lion, griffin, and eagle, and themes include the attainment of wealth, and impact of sickness and death. Includes a clamshell box.

Collection comprises a full-color, four-page manuscript metamorphosis book, with verses and pen-and-watercolor illustrations by Elizabeth Winspear, who was possibly a resident of New England. Each page features two flaps that fold out in stages to reveal new illustrations. Characters include Adam and Eve, along with a lion, griffin, and eagle, and themes include the attainment of wealth, and impact of sickness and death. Includes a clamshell box.

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Elizabeth York papers, 1970-1998 1.5 Linear Feet — 900 Items

Musician and music therapist. Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985.

Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985.

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Ellen Terry note, between 1878-1902 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a single autograph note on Lyceum Theatre letterhead (5"x8"). The actor Ellen Terry writes to "Olga" to schedule a social engagement. She writes, "I'm much grieved to hear of you mother ..." and sends "best remembrances" to Olga's husband. Dame Ellen Terry, considered the leading Shakespearean actor of her time, was a member of the company at London's Lyceum Theatre from 1878-1902.

Collection comprises a single autograph note on Lyceum Theatre letterhead (5"x8"). The actor Ellen Terry writes to "Olga" to schedule a social engagement. She writes, "I'm much grieved to hear of you mother ..." and sends "best remembrances" to Olga's husband.

Ellen Terry (1847-1928) was the leading Shakespearean actor of her time. She was born into a family of actors and started her career as a child. In 1878, she joined Henry Irving's company at the Lyceum Theatre. She portrayed many celebrated roles with that company through the end of her tenure there in 1902.

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Single-page written, signed testimony by Emily G. Wightman on the topic of her husband's physical abuse of her and his neglect of their children. Text reads: "Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed."

Single-page written testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman. Devised title; estimated location based on provenance.

"Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed."

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Emma Goldman was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the 20th century. The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs. The Emma Goldman papers are part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs.

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Emmeline and Frederick Pethick-Lawrence were British socialist activists best known for their involvement with the suffragist movement. This collection consists of four typescript notes and two greeting cards.

The collection consists of four typescript notes and two greeting cards. The first card is headed "Votes for Women, The National Women's Social and Political Union, Greetings and Good Wishes for 1908," addressed to Mr. and Mrs. Grinling from Mr. and Mrs. Pethick-Lawrence. The second card, dated 1936-1937, has a tipped-in photograph of the Pethick-Lawrences, signed "with love from Fred and Emmeline." A typescript letter, on The National Women's Social and Political Union stationery, dated July 8, 1908, is signed by Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Mrs. Grinling, and asks to have her husband convey a resolution passed at a Woolich suffrage meeting to Prime Minister Asquith. Included is a typescript copy of the letter from Grinling to Asquith carrying out the request. A typescript note, dated September 22, 1922, signed Mrs. Pethick-Lawrence on her letterhead, declines subscribing to something sent to her by Mr. Grinling. A typescript note from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to C.H. Grinling, dated October 3, 1945, mentions a copy of a birthday telegram Grinling sent to Gandhi, who she describes as "one of the great moral and religious leaders of the present age ... his reputation and his influence will continue to grow for many years to come." A typescript note signed "Fred," dated July 9, 1945 on "The Rt. Hon. Lord Pethick-Lawrence of Peaslake" letterhead thanks C.H. Grinling for a letter of welcome.

The library also holds a number of individually cataloged printed materials owned by the Pethick-Lawrences.

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Collection comprises a printed copy of a will (1875?), along with manuscript inventories; lists of stocks and bonds; related correspondence; and payments made against the estate of Margaret Bromfield Blanchard in 1877 and 1878. Henry B. Rogers served as her executor. There are also her manuscript records outlining the distribution of the estate, dated 1867-1868. The Bromfield School is mentioned extensively in the will and the distribution documents. In the will she outlines "if boys are admitted [to the school], I order that their number shall always be one-third less than that of girls." In addition, there are a few records related to the estate of Margaret Blanchard's grandfather?, Henry Bromfield, in Cheltenham, England, dated 1836-1842, including the executor's account. Unrelated documents include a written agreement between Mary Blanchard and Hiram Osborn for his assumption of the farming duties in 1864, along with a letter regarding the establishment of trustees for the Bromfield school, dated around 1890.

Collection comprises a printed copy of a will (1875?), along with manuscript inventories; lists of stocks and bonds; related correspondence; and payments made against the estate of Margaret Bromfield Blanchard in 1877 and 1878. Henry B. Rogers served as her executor. There are also her manuscript records outlining the distribution of the estate, dated 1867-1868. The Bromfield School is mentioned extensively in the will and the distribution documents. In the will she outlines "if boys are admitted [to the school], I order that their number shall always be one-third less than that of girls." In addition, there are a few records related to the estate of Margaret Blanchard's grandfather?, Henry Bromfield, in Cheltenham, England, dated 1836-1842, including the executor's account. Unrelated documents include a written agreement between Mary Blanchard and Hiram Osborn for his assumption of the farming duties in 1864, along with a letter regarding the establishment of trustees for the Bromfield school, dated around 1890.

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European tourist travel negatives, between 1910-1915 36 items — 1 box — 34 nitrate negatives; 2 original processing envelopes — 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches

This early 20th century collection of 34 nitrate sheet negatives features black-and-white travel images taken mainly in European cities. Subjects chiefly focus on popular tourist landmarks such as gardens, parks, bridges, buildings, and statuary. The travelers seem to be all women and at least one young child. Locations identified by library staff include Paris and Bruges, but other locations are unidentified, as are the photographer and subjects. It is assumed that some locations are in London or England, as one of two commercial photograph processing envelopes from the London firm Selfridge's accompanying the negatives is marked "English trip 1913." The negatives are sized 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches.

This early 20th century collection of 34 nitrate sheet negatives features black-and-white tourist travel images mainly taken in European cities sometime between 1910-1915. Subjects chiefly focus on landmarks such as gardens, parks, bridges, buildings, and statuary. The travelers seem to include women and at least one young child. Identified cities include Paris and Bruges, but other locations are uncertain, as are the identities of the photographer and subjects. Two commercial photographic processing envelopes are from the London firm Selfridge's; one is marked "English trip, 1913." The negatives are sized 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches.

The dating is taken in part from the 1913 date on the processing envelope and from a billboard advertising a musical being staged in Paris.

Forms part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection, acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Faithfull family papers, 1864-1887 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 22 items

The Faithful family focuses on the family of Rev. Ferdinand Faithfull and Elizabeth Mary Harrison of Headley Rectory in Surrey, England, and their eight children. Among the children were Esther Faithfull Fleet (1823–1908), who was both a book illustrator and the mother of seven children. The youngest child, Emily Faithfull (1836?-1895), was an feminist reformer, philanthropist, printer, publisher, novelist, and lecturer. Collection comprises 14 letters, an envelope autographed by Emily Faithfull, an invitation completed by her, a printed invitation acceptance, a carte de visite and two copies of a mounted albumen photograph of her, along with two illustrated pieces completed by Esther Faithfull Fleet.

Collection comprises 14 letters, an envelope autographed by Emily Faithfull, an invitation completed by her, a printed invitation acceptance, a carte de visite and two copies of a mounted albumen photograph of her, along with two illustrated pieces completed by Esther Faithfull Fleet. The letters, all written by Emily Faithfull, include routine correspondence and thank you notes; other topics include the capacity of Victoria Press to do law work; an honor bestowed on her by the professional women's organization, Sorosis, in New York; a statement in the Guardian newspaper claiming that in a speech she repudiated women's rights as it applied to her work; a request for early assistance with preparations for Christmas in order to provide relief for "some very distressing cases;" and inquiries regarding the printing of her "Jubilee Address" or its distribution. There is one letter to Henry Ward Beecher asking him to hand out notices regarding her upcoming lecture, and mentioning Lucretia Mott's plans to address the audience. Several letters feature the stamp or embossed stamp of the Victoria Press. The carte de visite was produced by the London Stereoscopic & Photography Co., and the mounted photographs by W. & D. Downey of Ebury Street, London. The illustrated pieces completed by Esther Faithfull Fleet include a calling card hand decorated in ink and watercolors (?), and a watercolor painting of a parrot.

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Faith Holsaert papers, 1950-2011 10.2 Linear Feet — 6525 items

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Faith Holsaert is a Civil Rights and LGBT community activist. The collection contains correspondence, newsletters, publications, and other materials relating to the activities of Faith Holsaert from the 1960s to the present. A large portion of the collection consists of correspondence and ephemera from her involvement in the Civil Rights movement, including SNCC, and the women's rights movement. Also includes materials from the writing and publishing of Hands on the Freedom Plow, some of which is restricted. The collection also has a large amount of personal memorabilia and materials relating to Holsaert's childhood and family. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Correspondence, newsletters, publications, and other materials relating to the activities of Faith Holsaert from the 1960s to the present. A large portion of the collection consists of correspondence and ephemera from her involvement in the Civil Rights movement, including SNCC, and the women's rights movement. Also includes materials from the writing and publishing of Hands on the Freedom Plow, some of which is restricted. The collection also has a large amount of personal memorabilia and materials relating to Holsaert's childhood and family.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Autograph manuscript letter with postmarked envelope from the actress and writer Fanny Kemble in London to Miss Patteson in Andover, 10 May, 1889. Kemble thanks Miss Patteson for sending photographs, mentioning that she particularly values one of Bishop Patteson. She says she is "glad Lord Coleridge thought Lenox (Mass.) pretty. It has always seemed to me a charming mountain village." Frances Anne "Fanny" Kemble was a British actress, writer, and abolitionist. She was born into a theater family; her acting career spanned the years 1829-1868. Kemble acted to support herself, but she was most passionate about writing, and was an accomplished playwright, poet, and diarist. She married the Pierce Mease Butler, an American who subsequently inherited his family' plantations. After spending time in Georgia, Kemble became an abolitionist and later divorced her husband. In 1863, Kemble published her anti-slavery memoir, Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839, which is said to have influenced the British against supporting the Confederacy in the Civil War. Kemble's own family was divided on that issue, as her elder daughter sided with her mother, while her younger daughter returned to Georgia with her father. Frances Butler Leigh published Ten Years on a Georgia Plantation Since the War (1883) as a rebuttal to her mother's memoir. Kemble's success as a Shakespearean actress enabled her to buy a cottage in Lenox, Massachusetts. Her correspondent, Miss Patteson, is the daughter of Frances Duke Patteson, a niece of the poet Samuel Coleridge Taylor; the Lord Coleridge mentioned in the letter is John Duke Coleridge (1820-1894), the 2nd Lord Chief Justice of England. Bishop Patteson refers to Miss Patteson's sister, John Patteson (1827-1871), who became an Anglican martyr after being killed doing mission work in the Solomon Islands.

Autograph manuscript letter with postmarked envelope from the actress and writer Fanny Kemble in London to Miss Patteson in Andover, 10 May, 1889. Kemble thanks Miss Patterson for sending photographs, mentioning that she particularly values one of Bishop Patteson. She says she is "glad Lord Coleridge thought Lenox (Mass.) pretty. It has always seemed to me a charming mountain village."

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The Feminist Women's Health Center in Atlanta, Georgia, was founded in 1976 by a group of women dissatisfied with the health care options and information available to them and who desired to change this situation. The clinic started in 1977 with self-help groups where women were able to learn from each other and themselves through open discussions. It expanded to offer a full range of clinical services (including providing access to birth control and contraception, abortion, donor insemination, and pregnancy care) as well as educational, outreach, and advocacy programs, addressing subjects such as sexual hygiene, sex, and sexually transmitted diseases. Collection is comprised of files documenting the development and daily operations of the Feminist Women's Health Center, a feminist non-profit women's healthcare center, from the years 1973-2003. Major components of the collection include files from research studies conducted at the center, policies and procedures for maintaining the center, and incidents of anti-abortion protests at the center, specifically involving the group Operation Rescue. The National Abortion Federation, the professional association of abortion providers in the United States and Canada, also figures prominently throughout these records. The collection is organized into six series: Administrative Files, Clinic Files, Subject Files, Financial Material, Legal Files, and Audiovisual Material. The collection also contains a physically separate Closed Series, comprised of materials from the prior six series that are currently closed to research.

Collection is comprised of files documenting the development and daily operations of the Feminist Women's Health Center (FWHC), a feminist non-profit women's healthcare center, from the years 1974-2003. Major components of the collection include files from research studies conducted at the center, policies and procedures for maintaining the center, and incidents of anti-abortion protests at the center, specifically involving the group Operation Rescue. The National Abortion Federation, the professional association of abortion providers in the United States and Canada, also figures prominently throughout these records. The collection is organized into six series: Administrative Files, Clinic Files, Subject Files, Financial Material, Legal Files, and Audiovisual Material. The collection also contains a physically segregated Closed Series.

The Administrative Files Series most clearly documents the day-to-day operations of the FWHC. Materials in this series include policies, procedures, and guidelines for operation of the center; minutes and notes from a range of meetings held by the center; personnel files; and schedules. This series contains four subseries: General Administrative Files, Meetings, Personnel Files, and Schedules.

Materials in the Clinic Files Series include a range of records related to clinical services provided and research studies conducted at the FWHC. This series has been divided into four subseries: Statistics, Laboratory Statistics, Research, and Patient Education Information.

The Subject Files Series includes files maintained by the staff of the FWHC on a range of topics related to women's health issues, events, local information, and other women's health clinics. This series contains two subseries: a General subseries which covers these subjects broadly, and an Anti-Abortion Violence subseries which focuses specifically on anti-abortion protests at the FWHC and other locations, the anti-abortion movement in the United States, and pro-choice efforts to counter this movement.

Items in the Financial Material Series consist of records, reports, and files documenting the financial situation of the FWHC between the years 1982 and 2001. These files detail the intricacies involved in operating a women's health clinic from a financial standpoint.

The Legal Files Series contains files related to legal issues faced by the FWHC, including lawsuits and legislation which would affect women's reproductive health and the clinic.

The Audiovisual Material Series consists of 28 audiocassettes and 11 videocassettes. Audiocassettes are primarily recordings of workshops, conference sessions, and events. Videocassettes are primarily educational. One videocassette documents anti-abortion protesters outside the FWHC.

The Closed Series consists of sensitive materials removed from the previous six series and CLOSED to research.

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Madame de Rhinfeld, née St. Clair, grew up in a convent in France, where she was instructed in the construction of artificial flowers. She later used this skill to make a living in England. Collection comprises an handwritten, unpublished manuscript volume (256 written pages, plus 45 watercolor and 5 pen and ink plates of illustrations) by Madame de Rhinfeld, written around 1830. In the manuscript, Rhinfeld provides detailed instruction on how to create 24 different artificial flowers, and describes the tools used to make them. Flowers include pomegranate, hyacinth, roses, pansies, narcissus, geraniums, and orange flowers, among others. Includes watercolor diagrams regarding the construction of each flower, with additional paintings of the finished piece. The instructions are accompanied by a chapter of poetry, stories, quotations, and commentary related to each flower. Scattered throughout the manuscript are other pen and ink drawings. Includes an index to flowers and to poets.

Collection comprises an handwritten, unpublished manuscript volume (256 written pages, plus 45 watercolor and 5 pen and ink plates of illustrations) by Madame de Rhinfeld, written around 1830. In the manuscript, Rhinfeld provides detailed instruction on how to create 24 different artificial flowers, and describes the tools used to make them. Flowers include pomegranate, hyacinth, roses, pansies, narcissus, geraniums, and orange flowers, among others. Includes watercolor diagrams regarding the construction of each flower, with additional paintings of the finished piece. The instructions are accompanied by a chapter of poetry, stories, quotations, and commentary related to each flower. Scattered throughout the manuscript are other pen and ink drawings. Includes an index to flowers and to poets.

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Frances Hooper papers, 1970s 0.6 Linear Feet — 3 items

Frances Hooper (1892-1986) was founder and president of the Frances Hooper Advertising Agency, and was one of the first female advertising executives in the United States. Accession (2009-0100) (3 notebooks; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1970s) consists of three spiral-bound collections of typed memoirs written by Hooper around the 1970s. Subjects include her childhood, her journalism career in Chicago, her transition into advertising with Marshall Fields, and descriptions of her friends, her travels, and her book collections. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0100) (3 notebooks; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1970s) consists of three spiral-bound collections of typed memoirs written by Hooper around the 1970s. Subjects include her childhood, her journalism career in Chicago, her transition into advertising with Marshall Fields, and descriptions of her friends, her travels, and her book collections. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Frances Power Cobbe letters, 1886 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Frances Power Cobbe was an Irish writer, social reformer, anti-vivisection activist, and leading women's suffrage campaigner. Cobbe wrote the first letter to Mrs. Madden, undated but probably in 1886, regarding vivisection along with the poor treatment of horses. She wrote the second, undated, letter to Miss Galtz[?], regarding a planned visit.

Cobbe wrote the first letter to Mrs. Madden, undated but probably in 1886, regarding vivisection along with the poor treatment of horses. She wrote the second, undated, letter to Miss Galtz[?], regarding a planned visit.

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Collection contains a letter from George Sand to Juliette Lamber, written 18 August 1867 at Sand's Nohant estate. The letter discusses possible plans to meet. Also, Sand acknowledges that she has been depressed by the death of her dear friend François Rollinat, and hopes their meeting can help her find courage to live. In a postscript, she adds that she has read Lamber's THE MANDARIN, and that Lamber has the elements of a serious talent. Includes an enclosure for the letter, as well as an English transcription.

Collection contains a letter from George Sand to Juliette Lamber, written 18 August 1867 at Sand's Nohant estate. The letter discusses possible plans to meet. Also, Sand acknowledges that she has been depressed by the death of her dear friend François Rollinat, and hopes their meeting can help her find courage to live. In a postscript, she adds that she has read Lamber's THE MANDARIN, and that Lamber has the elements of a serious talent. Includes an enclosure for the letter, as well as an English transcription.

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Girl Germs Posters, 1996-1999 2 Linear Feet — 9 Items

The Coalition for Positive Sexuality is a grassroots, not-for-profit, activist organization funded through grants and donations. CPS seeks to give teens information about sexual health and safe sex, and to facilitate dialogue in public schools about sex education. This collection consists of nine 18x24 posters produced by artist Jeanette May for the CPS Girl Germs campaign.

The collection consists of nine 18x24 posters created and distributed as part of The Coalition for Positive Sexuality's Girl Germs campaign in the late 1990s. These posters were created by artist Jeanette May, who was also a founding member of the CPS.

The posters include a black-and-white image of teenage women along with texts offering information about sex and sexuality, as well as telephone numbers for additional resources. All posters are captioned in both English and Spanish. Subjects covered by the posters include abortion, condoms, water-based lubricant, sexuality (including homosexuality and bisexuality), sex education, and rape.

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Grace Hazard Conkling letters, 1918, 1925. 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Grace Walcott Hazard Conkling was an American author, a poet and an English professor. Collection comprises two letters written to Conkling. The first was written by Florence Converse at the Atlantic Monthly, dated 1918 October 19, in regard to the publishing of Conkling's poem, "Names," in the magazine. The second was written by Elisabeth Cutting at the North American Review, dated 1925 June 22, asking Conkling to be a book reviewer, and mentioning Amy Lowell in association with a speech Conkling made.

Collection comprises two letters written to Conkling. The first was written by Florence Converse at the Atlantic Monthly, dated 1918 October 19, in regard to the publishing of Conkling's poem, "Names," in the magazine. The second was written by Elisabeth Cutting at the North American Review, dated 1925 June 22, asking Conkling to be a book reviewer, and mentioning Amy Lowell in association with a speech Conkling made.

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Hannah L. Schmitt was a camper at Michigamme girls camp in Michigamme, Mich., in the Upper Peninsula. Schmitt was born in Toledo, Ohio. Collection comprises a cloth-bound photograph album maintained by Schmitt when she attended Camp Michigamme, beginning in 1920. The album contains 243 black-and-white photographs, most measuring 4x2.5 inches. Images document camp life, and show Hannah and other young women living in tents, canoeing, swimming, playing sports, cleaning, entertaining themselves, reading and relaxing.

Collection comprises a cloth-bound photograph album maintained by Schmitt when she attended Camp Michigamme, beginning in 1920. The album contains 243 black-and-white photographs, most measuring 4x2.5 inches. Images document camp life, and show Hannah and other young women living in tents, canoeing, swimming, playing sports, cleaning, entertaining themselves, reading and relaxing. Places visited mentioned are Baldy, Pequaming, Sand Island, and Flat Island. Almost all of the images have captions written by Schmitt; several of them were later inked in color. There is also a photograph of the Hebard's Mill at Pequaming, Michigan, the mill that Ford Motor Company purchased in 1923. Photographs on several pages in the back of the album are of Schmitt family members, and were taken outside of the camp. A number of the images were developed by a Michigan company named "Forster's-Calumet." In addition to the photographs, the album contains some manuscript items, including notes, poetry, a Western Union Telegram (regarding Schmitt's relationship with a West Point Cadet), along with a 7-page story that represents each camper and staff member as clouds at dawn.

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Hannah Hutchinson married Samuel Mather in 1731; the couple settled in Boston, Mass. She died in 1781 (some sources have the death date 1752) and Samuel died in 1779. Collection comprises a request written by Hannah Hutchinson Matter on 3 April 1858 to Edward Hutchinson, asking him to fulfill the pecuniary bequest made to her by his father and to give the sum (4 pounds) to her son, Samuel Mather, Junior. The back of the request contains Samuel's note, dated 3 May 1858, stating that he received the money.

Collection comprises a request written by Hannah Hutchinson Matter on 3 April 1858 to Edward Hutchinson, asking him to fulfill the pecuniary bequest made to her by his father and to give the sum (4 pounds) to her son, Samuel Mather, Junior. The back of the request contains Samuel's note, dated 3 May 1858, stating that he received the money.