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Collection
The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the African-American community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a racically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the AfricanAmerican community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a radically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

Collection

Carrie F. Young papers, 1872-1894 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 21 items

Carrie F. Young was one of the first advocates of women's suffrage in California, and was an activist for other political causes. Young eventually became a physician, the first woman to receive a medical diploma in California, from the Oakland College of Medicine in 1884. Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials.

Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials. There is a letter regarding political matters and a typescript page of general instructions for an unnamed convention, both written by Young's son, Robert E. Bush; a recommendation for Young's work on national campaigns as a Republican poltical activist and speaker, dated 1889; two advertisements for a Mrs. Dr. Tarbell's treatments of "nervous diseases and female complaints;" two pages of guidelines for a populist club; one of Young's calling cards; and an enclosure for the California Medical Journal. There is also a brochure for "photographic fern-leaf mottoes." In addition, there are 8 flyers, handbills, and broadsides, all advertising political speeches (especially for the People's Party), lectures, or medical work by Young, except for two that advertise speeches by Mrs. M. S. Singer of Chicago, and Dr. J. V. C. Smith. Collection also includes issues of the serials Life Crystals (March 1882, no. 3), edited by Young, and Pacific Journal of Health (January-September 1872, nos. 1-9), published by Young.

Collection

Beth York papers, 1968-2015 9.0 Linear Feet

Musician and academic music therapist. Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985. Also includes materials documenting academic career including research, teaching, publishing, and grant administration.

Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985.

Accession 2018-0113 consists of materials documenting York's academic career as a music therapist, including her M.A. thesis, university evaluations and a tenure portfolio, teaching materials, research materials, conference materials, presentations, correspondence, workshop materials, a performance piece called Finding Voice, grant materials, and music therapy workshop materials.

York also co-edited a number of issues of the lesbian feminist quarterly Sinister Wisdom, which are included in the collection, as are production materials, drafts, and correspondence related to those issues. Also included are issues of the women's periodicals Hotwire and Paid My Dues.

Collection

Lisa Unger Baskin collection of materials about Anzia Yezierska, 1987-1988, 1987-1988 0.5 Linear Feet — Guide to the Lisa Unger Baskin collection of materials about Anzia Yezierska, 1987-1988

Anzia Yezierska (1880-1970) was a Polish-American author. Collection consists of materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin about the publication of "Anzia Yezierska: A Writer's Life," a biography by Yezierska's daughter, Louise Levitas Henriksen, published in 1988. Materials include drafts of a New York Times book review by Helen Yglesias. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Galley proof, unbound book manuscript, dust jacket, and materials regarding the publication of Anzia Yezierska: A Writer's Life, written by Louise Levitas Henriksen and Jo Ann Boydston in 1988. Includes a typescript draft with manuscript corrections of a review of the book by Helen Yglesias, later published in the New York Times.

Collection
Helen Yglesias (1915-2008) was an American novelist. Collection comprises photocopies of research material, along with an edited and final manuscript related to Yglesias' book, ISABEL BISHOP.

Collection comprises photocopies of research material, along with an edited and final manuscript related to Yglesias' book, ISABEL BISHOP, published by Rizzoli, 1989, New York.

Collection

Louisa Wright needlework sample book, 1888 0.8 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a volume entitled "Needlework," containing 16 pages of illustrations for sewing and darning patterns and techniques, accompanied by 22 finished samples. The title page indicates the work was done by Louisa Wright during a "Second Year" at an unnamed institute or training facility. There are illustrations for hemming and seaming, stitching, sewing on a tape, gathering, setting-in, making a buttonhole, herring-boning, darning a thin place, tacking, making a gusset, making a calico patch, darning a hole, whipping, using a print patch, crosscut darning, Swiss darning and grafting, and stocking-web darning. The volume has a sewn cover in khaki cloth featuring two pink ribbon closures with bows, buttons, and thread button-loops. The title "Needlework" is emboidered in pink thread.
Collection

Workers' Defense League records, 1940-1949 0.2 Linear Feet — 38 items

The Workers' Defense League was an American socialist organization devoted to promoting labor rights. Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization.

Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers' Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization. The main case was that of Odell Waller, a Virginia sharecropper sentenced to death in 1940 for killing his white landlord. Arguing that the landlord had cheated Waller and that he had in any case acted in self-defense, the WDL raised money for Waller's defense, lobbied for the commutation of his sentence, and mounted a nationwide publicity campaign on his behalf. The effort was unsuccessful, and Waller was executed on July 2, 1942. Other cases included Alton Levey, Rosario Chirillo, and Tee Davis; the organization worked in support of federal regulation to repeal poll taxes. Items include brochures on the Waller case, luncheon and dinner invitations, a tear sheet for an advertisement, action alerts, flyer announcing a contest and a mass meeting in New York, and contribution forms with mailing envelopes.

Also includes a fundraising mailer (1946 May 16) related to Tee Davis and sent by Lillian Smith, the author of the novel STRANGE FRUIT. Tee Davis was an African American from Arkansas who was sentenced to ten years in prison for assault with intent to kill. His crime was firing a shotgun towards the bottom of the front door to his home while an intruder tried to break in. The intruder was a white sheriff looking for thieves.

Collection

Virginia Woolf's oak writing desk, between 1904-1907 2.5 Linear Feet — 67.4 x 126 x 87.7 cm; 26.5 x 49.5 x 34.5 inches

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath. Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath.Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Collection
Virginia Woolf was an English writer and publisher, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection

Sarah Wood Zine collection, 1990s 2 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Sarah Wood was the co-owner of GERLL Press, a zine distro based in Chicago, Ill., in the early to mid-1990s. The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Many of these zines come directly from the GERLL Press inventory, or were submitted to Wood and Curry by their authors to be considered for sale through the distro. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Womonwrites records, 1979-2014 3.0 Linear Feet — 1875 Items

Womonwrites is an annual conference of lesbian writers. Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, meeting evaluations, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

RESTRICTIONS: Membership mailings lists, in Box 3, are CLOSED until 2020.

Collection
Women Work! improved women's economic security through job training, education, lobbying policymakers, and partnering with other national organizations. It was originally known as the Displaced Homemakers Network, and operated from 1978 until 2009. Accession (2009-0163) (12,375 items; 16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0163) (16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. CDs and other electronic data files have been removed and transferred to Duke's ERM server. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2015-0112) (0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1975-1990) is an addition that includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, administrative records, correspondance, and copies of the Network News, the publication for the Displaced Homemakers Network.

Collection
Materials documenting the Women's Worship Circle activities including correspondence, invitations, programs, handouts, liturgies, member reflections, photographs, planning and meeting notes and agendas.

The Women's Worship Circle records document the creation and operation of the organization, in which members engaged with and performed feminist theology through the development of their own worship services. The records consist of correspondence, liturgies, programs, meeting notes, handouts, members' reflections, photographs and invitations.

Collection
Collection comprises a poster that promotes the organization's "aims to make knowledge about women's bodies and health available to women," and to "develop policy about women's health with women." Important issues illustrated include affordable health care, stopping the spread of AIDS, and a woman's right to choose contraception. There is also contact information.
Collection
Online
Non-profit, inter-racial organization founded in Durham, N.C. in September 1968; Elna Spaulding was founder and first president. Collection comprises correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, as well as information about the organization's relationship to the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C. Documents the organization's involvement in the Durham community on a variety of issues, including easing racial tensions; smoothing the way for court ordered school integration in 1970; providing for the recreational and cultural needs of disadvantaged youth; and establishing a clearinghouse to offer information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of social problems.

The records of Women-In-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc. (WIAPVC), an interracial community service non-profit organization based in Durham, North Carolina, span the years 1968 to 1998. Materials document the organization's history beginning with its foundation in 1968, and include correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, clippings, photographs, a scrapbook, awards, and other documentation of its activities and milestones. The records contain information about the organization's various projects and workshops, and its relationship with the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C., Inc. Persons associated with the organization included business, political, and community leaders and activists, among them Ann Atwater, Mrs. William A. Clement, Mrs. James E. Davis, Dr. Juanita Kreps, Mrs. H.M. Michaux, Mrs. Kenneth C. Royall, Margaret Rose Sanford, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, and Mrs. Albert Whiting. There are also letters of support from Senators B. Everett Jordan and Sam Erwin.

The bulk of the early items in the Correspondence Series, dating from 1968 to 1969, reflects the tenacity and persistence on the part of Spaulding, the first president, in seeking money for the organization's activities. She sought funding from national and North Carolina foundations and local businesses. Among the contributors were the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Grant Foundation, and the City of Durham. Money was also raised by dues paid by its members, which became a point of controversy for the organization.

The Administrative Files include agendas and minutes for WIAPVC's general, board, executive, and advisory committees. Agendas and programs for general meetings indicate that the leaders in the organization attempted to maintain a balance between focusing on some aspect of the group itself (such as its by-laws and self-evaluation) and programs of community-wide importance. The advisory committee evolved from the steering committee and was made up of subcommittee chairs.

Folders in the Subcommittees Series generally contain correspondence, reports, and guidelines. Records show that the number of subcommittees waxed and waned depending on the need for them. Subcommittees for which records exist include Civic Improvement, Education, Human Relations, and Police-Community Relations. The subcommittees undertook outreach and programs that were significant to Durham's community.

The organization's outreach activities are also documented in the Conferences, Workshops, and Projects series. Conferences and workshops sponsored by the organization reflect the group's efforts to improve itself, support other organizations, and reach out to provide service to the community. In the same series, WIAPVC projects indicate the wide range of interests and responsibilities which the organization sought to undertake. Among those represented in the files are the Center for School Support; the Clearinghouse, which offered information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of concerns; Cornwallis Housing Project, which helped provide recreational needs for youth residing in the project; the Cultural Experience Pilot Project, which allowed for 37 Durham junior high school students from low income families to spend three days in Washington; the Durham Emergency Energy Committee, which helped provide fuel to needy families in the Durham community; and various intern projects, in which students from the Duke Divinity School Field Education Program participated.

The bulk of the processed collection consists of the early records of the WIAPVC. Later years (1980s-1990s) are represented in Accession 1996-0164 and Accession 2008-0104, which include financial activities, projects, administrative files, reports, event planning information, newsletters, and awards ceremonies.

Collection
Collection comprises a four-page embroidery examination completed in ink by Mrs. Fred Kennedy in Norfolk, Nebraska, including 6 stitch samples. The exam did not provide the questions, and has been annotated by the person who graded it, who also attached four typed comments to the stitch samples. Includes original mailing envelope.
Collection
During her career in women's public policy, Leslie R. Wolfe served as both the director of the Women's Educational Equity Act Program (WEEAP), and as the longtime director of the Center for Women Policy Studies. This collection documents her professional life and contains materials generated by her work with WEEAP, her speeches, women's health policy materials focusing on HIV/AIDS and human trafficking, and publications from the Center for Women Policy Studies.

The collection consists of materials documenting Leslie R. Wolfe's career in women's public policy, particularly her work as the director of the Women's Educational Equity Act Program from 1979-1987. These include lobbying materials, publications, speeches, grant administration, and correspondence. The collection also contains materials documenting Wolfe's work on women's health care policy from her time with the Center for Women Policy Studies, with an emphasis on HIV/AIDS and human trafficking. These materials include publications, conference proceedings, research reports, and correspondence.

Collection
Collection comprises a full-color, four-page manuscript metamorphosis book, with verses and pen-and-watercolor illustrations by Elizabeth Winspear, who was possibly a resident of New England. Each page features two flaps that fold out in stages to reveal new illustrations. Characters include Adam and Eve, along with a lion, griffin, and eagle, and themes include the attainment of wealth, and impact of sickness and death. Includes a clamshell box.
Collection
Delouis Wilson is an African American artist, and jewelry designer, and art collector, based in Durham, North Carolina. The papers comprise her journals (1977-2008); calendar organizers; sketchbooks, art school notebooks, and loose pieces of mixed media artwork. The journals, currently closed to use, document in detail her personal life, travels in the U.S. and abroad, including time spent in Tunisia in the Peace Corps, life in Durham, N.C., and employment as a jewelry designer. The collection also includes 30 large photographic crayon enlargement studio portraits, most convex-mount, of African Americans, dating from about 1890 to 1945 and collected by Wilson chiefly in the Southern U.S. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts, the Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The papers of Delouis Wilson, an artist and jewelry designer based in North Carolina, consist of a set of 27 journals (1977-2008, currently closed); a few calendar notebooks; sketchbooks and notebooks from her time at Atlanta College of Art; and loose pieces of artwork. An important component of Wilson's archive consists of a collection of 30 large photographic portraits of African Americans dating from the late 1880s to about 1940, collected by Wilson chiefly in the American South.

Wilson's journals (closed to use by donor request), calendars, and notebooks document in detail the personal life of the artist, life in Durham, N.C., her travels abroad and in the U.S., including time in Tunisia in the Peace Corps, and her career as a jewelry designer. They include small illustrations contain as well as laid-in items such as letters and postcards; some have handmade covers constructed of textiles and other non-paper materials.

The artwork, sketchbooks, and art notebooks present a mix of drawings, sketches, prints, textile work, and mixed-media color paintings created by Wilson during and shortly after her art school years, all 8x11 inches or less. The notebooks also include art school class notes and handouts, creative writings, and personal notes such as recipes, lists, housing notes, and addresses. There are self-portraits scattered throughout, including a larger piece from 1990 laid into a sketchbook. Also in the collection is one large color photograph of an African American woman by Wilson. The artworks range in size from 4 1/2 x 6 to 16x20 inches.

The majority of the thirty historic photographic portraits collected by Wilson are unframed bust portraits of individual Black men and women, with some of couples and families. The studios developed the images on convex pieces of card stock, then outlined and filled them with ink, crayon, or pastel pigments to resemble a painting. Some of the prints are black-and-white, and some are on flat mounts. Due to their fragile condition, the portraits are currently closed to use until Conservation treatment is completed.

Collection
Cornelia Ann Ludlow Willink (1788-1866) used these notebooks as a young girl in New York studying penmanship, mathematics, and geography. The math workbook (dated 1796) is hardback bound, with arithmetic lessons on numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and measurements. The five copybooks (dated approximately 1800-1802) are bound in marbled paper, with school assignments and lessons on penmanship, geography and history about the United States and Canada, repeatedly copied sentences about manners, morals, and character, and other assorted assignments. Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin, and was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of a mathematics manuscript workbook and five manuscript copybooks used by Cornelia Ann Ludlow as a young girl between the ages of approximately eight and fourteen years old (dating between 1796 and 1802). The math workbook (dated 1796) is hardback bound, with arithmetic lessons on numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and measurements. The five copybooks (dated approximately 1800-1802) are bound in marbled paper, with school assignments and lessons on penmanship, geography and history about the United States and Canada, repeatedly copied sentences about manners, morals, and character, and other assorted assignments.

Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

Collection
Helen Maria Williams was a British novelist, poet, and translator of French-language works. Collection comprises four letters written by Helen Maria Williams, two to her nephew, Athanase Laurent Charles Coquerel, one to Mrs. Joel [Ruth] Barlow, and one to an unidentified recipient.

Collection comprises four letters written by Helen Maria Williams, two to her nephew, Athanase Laurent Charles Coquerel, one to Mrs. Joel [Ruth] Barlow, and one to an unidentified recipient. Williams provided aid for fellow republican radicals. On 22 August 1798, she wrote to her American expatriate friend Ruth Barlow. Williams hoped that Ruth's husband, the diplomat Joel Barlow, would assist James Wollstonecraft (Mary's brother), who was then in prison in Paris as a suspected spy. The letter notes Thomas Payne's [Paine's] ineffective efforts on James' behalf. Other topics in the letters include Coquerel's position, her income, the health and situation of friends and family members, and an unnamed woman she wishes to avoid. Three letters are accompanied by partial or full transcription.

Collection

Lady Wilde letter, 1852 November 19 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Collection comprises a letter from Lady Wilde discussing the loss of her mother, followed by her marriage, and announcing the birth of her eldest son, William Charles Kingsbury Wilde. She also comments on marriage, "a woman's duty ends with marriage. She becomes a vegetable, a house leek, a mop--I feel that I am 'potted' for the rest of my days...." Includes an enclosure with a note written in another hand identifying Wilde along with the letter's recipient, whose last name may be Grant.
Collection
Single page testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman describing her husband's physical abuse and his neglect of his children.

Single-page handwritten manuscript testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman on the topic of her husband's physical abuse of her and his neglect of their children. Text reads: "Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed." Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Susan Wicklund papers, 1970-2013 8 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Dr. Susan Wicklund is a former abortion provider from Wisconsin. The papers chiefly document her professional career, centering on her work in the Midwest, where she operated abortion clinics in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and Wisconsin from the 1990s to 2013. Materials include many items of correspondence from patients, supporters, and opponents; files on national and local abortion rights and women's movement groups; articles and newspaper clippings; conference papers; materials related to anti-abortion groups; legal documents, including court case records; a recording of her 1992 "60 Minutes" television interview, and drafts of her book, This Common Secret: My Journey as an Abortion Doctor (2007). A few clinic documents also exist in the form of leasing records, sample charts, manuals, and anonymized guestbooks. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Susan Wicklund papers include personal correspondence and professional papers regarding her work as an abortion provider in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. Materials relate mostly to her work at Mountain Country Women's Clinic in Livingston, Montana in the 1990s, and include newspaper clippings, letters of support, patient reviews, donations, and administrative documents relating to the clinic in the form of sample charts, manuals, and anonymized guestbooks.

Materials relating to Wicklund's 1992 television interview on the "60 Minutes" program include a VHS tape of the interview, clippings, and many letters of support as well as hate mail.

The collection also contains materials related to anti-abortion groups and their harassment of Wicklund; these records also include legal documents referring to a related court case.

Also present in the collection are materials about various women's health organizations, support groups, conferences, and other clinics and centers, including Planned Parenthood, National Women's Organization, and the National Abortion Rights Action League. Drafts of Wicklund's book, This Common Secret: My Journey as an Abortion Doctor (2007) are also in this collection.

Collection
Collection comprises Edith Wharton's corrected Italian manuscript (34 typed pages) for her short story, "La Duchessa in Preghiera" (The Duchess at Prayer), originally published in English in Scribner's Magazine, August 1900, then by Scribner's in the collection of her stories, "Crucial Instances," 1901. The corrections are in Italian and are in Wharton's own hand.
Collection

Rebecca West note, 16 August 1931 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item — 12.5 x 16.5

Rebecca West was a British writer and critic. The Rebecca West note consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown correspondent reading, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

The collection consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown recipient which reads, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

Collection
Celeste Wesson is a radio producer and Duke University graduate. These papers document her work with the Women's Radio Collective of WDBS, Duke's campus radio station.

Collection consists of materials documenting the work of the WDBS Women's Radio Collective, including meeting minutes, programming and how-to guides, and materials aimed at addressing the needs of women in radio production.

Collection

Anna Lora Weiss Account Books, 1896-1910 0.2 Linear Feet — 2 Items

Anna Lora Weiss, born circa 1858, lived in Boston's Dorchester section and owned several rental properties throughout the city. She was also a member of several voluntary and charitable associations, including the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and the Commitee on Music for the School Committee of Boston. Her family, including her mother Mary Clapp Weiss, brothers Richard and Carl, and sister Mary, were of German descent. Collection contains two account books, dated 1896-1904 and 1905-1910 respectively, kept by Anna Lora Weiss of Boston, Mass. The account books meticulously document Weiss's income, including significant income she received from her rental properties and other investments, as well as her expenditures on travel, household goods, gifts, and charitable contributions. In addition, the account books indicate that Weiss loaned money at interest to her brother Carl for his often unsuccessful business endeavors. In addition to her finances, the account books also document Weiss's daily activities and social and political interests. Together, the account books reveal that Weiss was an active, independent, and astute businesswoman. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection contains two account books, dated 1896-1904 and 1905-1910 respectively, kept by Anna Lora Weiss of Boston, Mass. The account books meticulously document Weiss's income, including significant income she received from her rental properties and other investments, as well as her expenditures on travel, household goods, gifts, and charitable contributions. In addition, the account books indicate that Weiss loaned money at interest to her brother Carl for his often unsuccessful business endeavors. In addition to her finances, the account books also document Weiss's daily activities and social and political interests. Together, the account books reveal that Weiss was an active, independent, and astute businesswoman.

Collection
Diane Weddington worked as a journalist and religion editor at the Contra Costa Times in the 1980s-1990s. She has also taught courses in journalism, public policy, new media, and ethics. Collection includes Weddington's published articles, research clippings, reporter notes, and other publications and materials from her journalism career, divinity school studies, background material for arts journalism, and materials documenting Weddington's educational and teaching careers. Topics represented include the gay and lesbian community in San Francisco, the ordination of women and gay clergy, the women's rights movement, domestic violence and child abuse, Alzheimer's Disease, and other miscellaneous subjects.

The collection includes a variety of materials, ranging from Weddington's published articles to clippings of other articles used in her research. The coverage of the homosexual community in and around San Francisco is represented in two series; the first being Coverage of Gay Clergy in the Church. This series includes legal proceedings by the Lutheran Church against gay clergy, as well as Weddington's own reporter notebooks from her time covering the subject. A second series, Coverage of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Communities, includes materials from Weddington's involvement in the National Lesbian and Gay Journalist Association and the Frameline film festival. Also included in this series are coverage of the blackballing of gay and lesbian news by the Contra Costa Times, business directories from San Francisco, local gay pride events, and mainstream coverage of gays and lesbians in America.

The series on Weddington's Research, Clippings, and Reporting from Various Projects includes materials from her religion beat at the Contra Costa Times, as well as other internal correspondence and clippings from her work at the newspaper. Subjects include general women's news, as well as articles on domestic violence and rape, child abuse, Satanism, recovered memory phenomena, and women's rights. Also included in this series are materials from Weddington's many projects, including the War Tax Resistance campaign, Diablo Valley study groups and clubs, Journalists Exchange on Aging, and gardening. Finally, this series includes materials from Weddington's coverage of the visit of Pope John Paul II to San Francisco in 1987.

Women in the Church includes materials from Weddington's own involvement in the women's ordination movement in the Episcopal Church, as well as her clippings of coverage regarding women and religion during the 1970s-1980s. Also related and included in this series are Weddington's materials from her time as a student at the Divinity School at Duke University in the 1970s.

Weddington's Published Articles and Reporter's Notes appear to date largely from 1986-1992, although many articles and most of her notes are undated. These clippings from the Contra Costa Times along with news wires reveal the breadth of Weddington's journalism, with topics ranging from the religion section to breaking news about traffic accidents. The materials are not sorted or arranged in any way. Along with clippings and reporter's notebook pages, the series also includes some correspondence from readers, internal Contra Costa Times photography requests, press releases, and other miscellaneous pages used by Weddington in her work.

Finally, the Correspondence series includes both electronic (print-outs) and postal correspondence. One part of the series consists of dot matrix printer printouts of internal communications between the staff and management of the Contra Costa Times. Weddington writes that this material documents the bias against gays and lesbians, as well as the regular workflow of the newspaper in terms of scheduling reporters, meeting deadlines, internal gossip, and so on. Another portion of the series contains letters, greeting cards, and other personal and professional correspondence. These have been arranged by year but not sorted further.

Accession (2014-0169) contains materials documenting Weddington's education and teaching careers, personal and professional correspondence, as well as materials relating to her work as a reporter, material related to her book on Alzheimer's disease, and work on the arts for the National Parks Service.

Included are materials from her grade school studies, undergraduate career at Duke University, work at Duke Divinity School, journalism coursework at the University of Missouri, and graduate studies at Berkeley in journalism and law. Teaching materials include courses taught at Contra Costa Community college on journalism and ethics. She has also taught couses on media and public policy. Also included are clippings and extensive research materials from her arts journalism in California, including work done for the Contra Costa Times.

Collection

Mary Margaret Wade papers, 1966-2007 9.4 Linear Feet — 6555 Items

Artist, writer, and arts educator. Collection contains personal correspondence, photographs, writings and drawings, subject files, ephemera, and clippings. The photographs document Wade's personal life, her art exhibits, and trips to Cuba, Alaska, and Costa Rica. The drawings and writings primarily consist of published versions and drafts of cartoons, as well as some manuscripts of writings and drawings for texts, including the artwork for Have You Ever Seen an Ugly Bride?, an unpublished book by Wade and Elizabeth Lide. The subject files include a file for the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South, an abortion rights petition signed by Norma McCorvey, and typescripts documenting the Kilbuck family, who were ancestors of Wade's that were missionaries in Alaska. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection contains personal correspondence, photographs, writings and drawings, subject files, ephemera, and clippings. The photographs document Wade's personal life, her art exhibits, and trips to Cuba, Alaska, and Costa Rica. The drawings and writings primarily consist of published versions and drafts of cartoons, as well as some manuscripts of writings and drawings for texts, including the artwork for Have You Ever Seen an Ugly Bride?, an unpublished book by Wade and Elizabeth Lide. The subject files include a file for the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South, an abortion rights petition signed by Norma McCorvey, and typescripts documenting the Kilbuck family, who were ancestors of Wade's and Moravian missionaries in Alaska in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Veteran Feminists of America records, 1971-2017 31.4 Linear Feet — 30.4 lin. ft.

Online
Veteran Feminists of America (VFA) is a nonprofit organization for veterans of the Second Wave of the feminist movement. It was founded by Jacqueline Ceballos and held its first feminist reunion in 1993. The organization continues to operate today, sponsoring reunions, programs, and publications honoring feminists throughout the United States. The accession (2008-0286) includes administrative files, program and reunion materials, obituaries, correspondence, financial information, newsletters, periodicals, and photographs relating to the activities and programs of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs, floppy disks, and CDs, some of which have been withdrawn for electronic preservation. There are also medals and other ephemera. The addition (2008-0254) consists of DVDs of VFA events and interviews. Addition (2009-0131) includes administrative files, events files, and other organizational information. Addition (2010-0097) includes program information and other organizational files, predominately from VFA's conference, The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders, held in Dallas in March 2010. Addition (2010-0128) includes honoree information forms and materials from the Dallas conference. Addition (2012-0083) includes a program from the Tribute to Helen Reddy event (2006) and two copies of an associated commerically-available music compact disc by Sandy Rapp; along with the souvenir program from the VFA salute to feminist lawyers (2009). Addition (2017-0058) includes conference programs from several conferences that took place in the early 2000's and 2010's. The addition also includes meeting minutes from the annual VFA board meeting. Addition (2017-0139) includes administrative files and planning materials for different events that documented the history of VFA and the Second Wave Feminist Movement; along with a history of VFA (2013). Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection (2008-0286) includes administrative files, program and reunion materials, obituaries, correspondence, financial information, newsletters, periodicals, and photographs relating to the activities and programs of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs, floppy disks, and CDs, some of which have been withdrawn for electronic preservation. There are also medals and other ephemera. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The addition (2008-0254) (64 items; 1.2 lin. ft.) consists of DVDs of VFA events and interviews.

The addition (2009-0131) (900 items; 1.8 lin. ft., dated 2001-2008) consists of board minutes, administrative materials, program files, some correspondence, and publicity. Program files include reunions, special presentations, conferences on feminist history and issues, and other educational and commemorative events. In particular, the accession includes materials from the Salute to Feminist Lawyers event put on in June 2008 at the Harvard Club in New York.

The addition (2010-0097) (300 items; 0.6 lin. ft., dated 2005-2010) includes miscellaneous newsletters, dated 2005-2008; board meeting minutes from 2007; event and program files from a 2009 Pompano Beach, FL awards gala and a Dallas conference entitled The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders, held March 2010. The Dallas event files include copies of materials on 22 honorees, as well as the program text and other promotional materials. Other topics in this accession include website initiatives and the Feminists Who Changed America book launch.

The addition (2010-0128) (150 items; 0.6 lin. ft., dated 2009-2010) includes materials submitted by honorees at the "The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders" conference held by the VFA in Dallas. Materials include information forms, resumes, essays, and other miscellaneous biographies.

The addition (2012-0083) (4 items; 0.1 lin. ft., dated 2006, 2009) includes a program from the Tribute to Helen Reddy event (2006) and two copies of an associated commerically-available music compact disc by Sandy Rapp; along with the souvenir program from the VFA salute to feminist lawyers (2009).

The addition (2015-0069) (1800 items; 3.0 lin. ft., dated 2011-2014) consists of event information, program and administrative files relating to the activities of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs of event programming, including the Kate Millett festival (2012), and Labor and the Women's Movement (2014).

The addition (2017-0058) (.2 lin. ft., dated 2002-2017) consists of program and administrative files related to the operation of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media includes two DVDs; one is of the Harvard Club Luncheon (2014) and the other is of the Veteran Feminist Association South Florida Luncheon (2009).

The addition (2017-0139) (.2 lin. ft., dated 2007-2017 consists of administrative and program files related to the activities of the Veteran Feminists of America.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Lenora Greenbaum Ucko papers, 1966-2013 7 Linear Feet — 4220 Items

Professor of anthropology, sociology, and social work, who founded StoriesWork, a non-profit organization in Durham, N.C. that advocates Therapeutic Storytelling, or the use of folk story analysis for empowering abused women. Collection consists of several separate accessions and includes Ucko's travel diaries; teaching and course materials; transcripts of Ucko's publications, including her book, Endangered Spouses; correspondence; Russian genalogy; materials from the Henry Zvi Ucko Memorial Exhibit, "What We Brought with Us," which featured personal items taken by German Jews who fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s; and other materials from Ucko's position at the Museum of the Jewish Family in the late 1990s. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2006-0015) consists primarily of files, lectures, and papers for classes taught by Ucko; files pertaining to cross-cultural communications prepared for the U.S. Army JFK Special Warfare Center; 20 labeled color slides; and travel diaries from Sierra Leone, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Egypt, Senegal, Pakistan, and Holland.

Addition (2007-0015) (750 items, 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 1973-1994) contains typescripts and promotional material for articles and books including Endangered Spouses; course materials including files, papers, and class rosters; correspondence; and one audiocassette. Also included are materials from a study of Russian genealogy by students at Aldephi University directed by Ucko.

Addition (2007-0066) (200 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1996-1998) contains slides, photographs, oral histories on audiocassettes, 1 VHS videocassettes, printed and other materials all concerning a 1996 exhibit Lenora Ucko curated in honor of her late husband, Henry Zvi Ucko. The exhibit was entitled "What We Brought with Us", an exhibit about the personal items taken by German Jews who fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s. The exhibit was first at Duke University and then moved to the NC Museum of History in Raleigh.

Addition (2011-0063) (900 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2002) largely consists of materials from Ucko's involvement in the Museum of the Jewish Family. Museum materials include programming pamphlets and advertising, exhibitions, budget materials, grant applications, Board of Directors correspondence and meeting minutes, newsletters, mission and by-laws, and other materials from the operation of the organization, primarily dated 1997-1998. Other items in this addition include some of Ucko's correspondence, her research on museums and memory, and some StoriesWork materials.

Addition (2013-0052) (75 items; .1 lin. ft.; dated 1975, 1981-1982, 2004, 2006, 2008-2009, 2013) includes a research paper and notes on Israeli absorption centers as well as newsletters and pamphlets for StoriesWork. Other items in this addition include pamphlets and flyers advertising Ucko's research consulting business, a program for a 1975 production of All in the Family at the University of Maryland Munich campus (Ucko served as faculty advisor), and a 2013 resume.

The Lenora Greenbaum Ucko Papers were acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Liberia to America poem, 1849 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Martin Farquhar Tupper was an English writer and poet. Collection comprises Martin Farquhar Tupper's manuscript poem in four verses, "Liberia to America." Signed, with location Albury, England [crossed out], Surrey. Tupper was among the first to support the new country; he exhorts Americans to support their "sable" brothers and to recognize the state officially, "with gracious glance befriend Thine own sons, no longer slaves!" The poem is undated, but probably dates around 1849, with the United States' formal recognition of Liberia.

Collection comprises Martin Farquhar Tupper's manuscript poem in four verses, "Liberia to America." Signed, with location Albury, England [crossed out], Surrey. Tupper was among the first to support the new country; he exhorts Americans to support their "sable" brothers and to recognize the state officially, "with gracious glance befriend Thine own sons, no longer slaves!" The poem is undated, but probably dates around 1849, with the United States' formal recognition of Liberia.

Collection

Mary B. Tuckey poems, 1845-1846 0.4 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a volume containing nine handwritten poems prepared by Mary B. Tuckey and others for the 1845 anti-slavery fair held in Boston, Massachusetts, but brought together in a presentation volume. The volume features hand-painted covers and two illustrations, and was presented to Maria Weston Chapman, editor of the Boston Liberty Bell, by Mary Mannix, secretary of the female anti-slavery society in Cork, Ireland, in 1846. The volume was enclosed in a case with a leather spine, with initials "M.M. to M.W.C" and dated "Cork, 1846." One of the poems commemorates Frederick Douglass' visit to Cork.
Collection
Raging Grannies is an activist organization that promotes peace, justice and social and economic equality by raising consciousness through song and satire. They also aim to challenge stereotypical assumptions about advocacy and aging. This collection contains materials documenting the Triangle chapter of the Raging Grannies in North Carolina from 1998-2015.

The Triangle Raging Grannies records consist of photographs, newspaper clippings, protest song lyrics, member lists, flyers and other paraphernalia related to the activities of the organization around the Triangle area of North Carolina.

Collection

Triangle Community Works records, 1974-2008 5.5 Linear Feet — 4125 Items

Triangle Community Works! was formed in 1994 and consists of a coalition of groups, including ASPYN (A Safer Place Youth Network), The Gay and Lesbian Helpline, P-FLAG (Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays), and RRNGLE (Raleigh Religious Network for Gay and Lesbian Equality). Collection includes historical documents from several groups in Triangle Community Works!, including ASPYN, RRNGLE, and the Gay and Lesbian Helpline. Materials date from the 1970s to 2008.

This collection (Accession 2009-0276) includes historical documents from several groups in Triangle Community Works!, including ASPYN, RRNGLE, and the Gay and Lesbian Helpline. Materials date from the 1970s to 2008 and include news clippings, newsletters, publicity materials, meeting minutes, organizational records, and administrative files.

Collection
According to the Triangle Business and Professional Guild bylaws, the TBPG aims to establish a network of business and professional resources, to encourage fellowship and support among businesses, professionals, and charitable pursuits, and to provide and promote positive role models in the gay and lesbian community, particularly in the Triangle (Raleigh, Chapel Hill, and Durham) area of North Carolina. This organization was founded in the early 1990s and is based in Raleigh. Accession (2008-0168) (900 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1970-2006) includes TBPG newsletters from 1993-2006, news clippings highlighting the lesbian and gay communities, and some administrative material. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2008-0168) (900 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1970-2006) includes TBPG newsletters from 1993-2006, news clippings highlighting the lesbian and gay communities, and some administrative material. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Dame Sybil Thorndike was a distinguished British actress best known for her work on stage. In this letter to the actress and playwright Elizabeth Robins, Thorndike thanks her for the gift of some heather from Yorkshire. She also sends her regards and thanks to "Lady Bell" for her support. The letter is addressed to Robins at Rounton Grange, the North Yorkshire estate which was the family home of the writer Florence Bell ("Lady Bell"). Bell and Robins were close friends and collaborators. Thorndike refers to a play; at the time of this letter, she was in rehearsals for the 1922-23 London production of Shelley's The Cenci at the New Theater, directed by her husband, Lewis Casson. This letter connecting three key female figures of the London stage is evidence of the strong support network these women formed in a male-dominated arena.

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter from Sybil Thorndike to Elizabeth Robins at Rounton Grange, Northallerton in North Yorkshire. In the letter, Thorndike thanks Robins for sending her a piece of heather from Rounton Grange. Thorndike writes, "I am sure it is going to bring us luck, and I love having something from Rounton on my dressing table. How lovely to think of you up there among the peacocks and the glorious moors! I really think the play is going to be a success." The letter is signed "yours affectionately, Sybil" with a manuscript postscript asking Robins to give her love to Lady Bell, and to thank Lady Bell for her support. The letter is composed on Thorndike's own letterhead stationery, "Miss Sybil Thorndike" at the address of the New Theater, London and listing her husband, Lewis Casson, as Director. The play in production Thorndike refers to is Shelley's The Cenci, in which she played the lead, Beatrice. With stamped, postmarked envelope.

Collection

Third Wave Foundation records, 1992-2011 3.5 Linear Feet — 2600 Items

Feminist activist organization that works nationally to support young women and transgender youth. Collection includes administrative files, fundraising materials, grant partner information, photographs, clippings, and conference materials. Also includes restricted electronic information. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes some administrative files, grant materials, research, fundraising, and conference files from the duration of Third Wave's existence, with the majority of files dating 1997-2006. Also includes photographs and clippings collected by Third Wave documenting various events and activities. Some materials are restricted, including board meeting minutes, electronic records, and audiovisual tapes. Please contact Research Services before visiting the library to use this collection.

Collection acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Third Side Press records, 1991-2003 13.2 Linear Feet — 8775 items

Third Side Press, a feminist publisher of women's health and lesbian fiction books, was founded in 1991 and ceased active publication in 1998. It was dissolved as a corporation in 2003. During the years of active publication, Third Side Press produced between 20 and 25 titles, mostly in paperback, including top sellers such as CANCER AS A WOMEN'S ISSUE and THE WOMAN-CENTERED ECONOMY. Midge Stocker is the founder and publisher of Third Side Press. Materials include correspondence, financial records, book proofs and files, book reviews, and other records relating to the operation of Third Side Press publishing house. Also includes copies of several Third Side Press publications. Floppy disks and other electronic materials have been removed for preservation. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Materials include correspondence, financial records, book proofs and files, book reviews, and other records relating to the operation of Third Side Press publishing house. Also includes copies of several Third Side Press publications. Floppy disks and other electronic materials have been removed for preservation. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Dame Ellen Terry, considered the leading Shakespearean actor of her time, was a member of the company at London's Lyceum Theatre from 1878-1902. Collection comprises an autograph note on Lyceum Theatre letterhead (5"x8"). The actor Ellen Terry writes to "Olga" to schedule a social engagement. She writes, "I'm much grieved to hear of you mother ..." and sends "best remembrances" to Olga's husband. There is also an undated cabinet photograph, by Window & Grove photographers, London.

Collection comprises an autograph note on Lyceum Theatre letterhead (5"x8"). The actor Ellen Terry writes to "Olga" to schedule a social engagement. She writes, "I'm much grieved to hear of you mother ..." and sends "best remembrances" to Olga's husband. There is also an undated cabinet photograph, by Window & Grove photographers, London.

Collection

Meredith Tax papers, 1956-2016 125 Linear Feet — 213 boxes

Meredith Tax is a feminist writer and organizer who has been active since the 1960s. This large collection of her papers includes many files of records documenting her activism in feminism and her role in founding feminist organizations; drafts and manuscripts of her writings, music, and art; personal and professional correspondence; research materials; and subject files. Organizations well represented include Bread and Roses; Women's WORLD; CARASA (Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse); PEN American Center Women's Committee; and the International PEN Women's Writers Committee, as well as many other materials on other organizations. There are also 89 audio cassettes and a few VHS tapes and optical media containing Tax's research interviews as well as interviews with Tax. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

The Meredith Tax papers include materials from the activist organizations she was involved with, as well as drafts and manuscripts of her written work, some personal correspondence, teaching materials, and audio/visual materials.

The largest group of materials at over 130 boxes documents Tax's long career as an activist, beginning with her involvement in Boston's Bread and Roses, a socialist-feminist collective through her continued work with Women's WORLD, a global free speech network Tax cofounded in 1994 to fight gender-based censorship. Other organizations Tax was involved in are also well documented in the collection, including CARASA (Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse); PEN American Center Women's Committee; and International PEN Women's Writers Committee. Smaller amounts of material come from Tax's work with the October League, Chicago Women's Liberation Union, National Writers' Union, and the West Side Community School, as well as other organizations. These materials include committee and board materials, events files, conferences, and many files of organizational notes and records.

Tax's work as a writer, including books, both fiction and nonfiction, articles, essays, and speeches as well as songs, is represented in the Writings, Speeches, and Songs series. The Correspondence series includes both personal and professional correspondence. The Subject Files were created by Tax for research related to her activism and her writing.

Finally, there are 89 audiocassettes, 53 of which contain Tax's research interviews and 36 of which contain interviews with Tax, readings by Tax and board meetings. Other interviews are on several VHS videocassettes and optical discs.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection
Sally Tatnall is a self-described radical feminist and community and political activist from Cleveland Heights, Ohio. Her work centers on lesbian rights, feminism, women's spirituality, reproductive health, anti-racism, and back-to-the-land projects. The collection includes personal materials such as journals, correspondence and photographs, as well as documentation of Tatnall's activism, and printed materials including 1970s sex education pamphlets.

The collection consists of journals, correspondence, meeting minutes, clippings, workshop materials, conference materials, research, and printed materials. Materials document lesbian feminist activism in Cleveland, Ohio, including marches, demonstrations, a feminist Land Project, Restore Cleveland Hope, an art project based on Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party, and the Radical Thought Conference. Printed materials include What She Wants: Cleveland's Monthly Feminist and Lesbian newspaper, 1970s sex education pamphlets, and a group of zines made by high school students in response to Tatnall's work.

Collection
Studio Girl Cosmetics Records include promotional materials related to the multi-level marketing and direct sales cosmetics company. Collection includes leaflets and a pamphlet with beauty tips as well as sales team recruitment materials. Also contains an LP record with the voice of company Chairman Harry Taylor.

The Studio Girl Cosmetics Records include promotional materials related to the Glendale, California-based multi-level marketing and direct sales cosmetics company. This one-folder collection includes two promotional leaflets with beauty tips for customers: “Your Studio Girl Way to Loveliness,” and “Studio Girl: Hollywood Coiffure Blend Hair Fashions of Permalon.” There is also one pamphlet for potential Studio Girl sales representatives called “From a Man’s Point of View.” Other items are recruitment materials including a sales team member application, identification cards, stamped paper bags for products, and branded mailing envelopes. Also contains a plasticized LP record with the voice of company Chairman Harry Taylor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture.

Collection
Strong Women Organizing Outrageous Projects (SWOOP) was a non-profit organization in Raleigh, NC that performed community service projects to help people and organizations in need of home repair and landscaping. The collection includes a series of photo albums and binders documenting SWOOP projects, as well as administrative materials. The binders include correspondence with partner organizations and SWOOP members as well as newsletters and notices about upcoming projects. Board meeting minutes, organizational efforts in the wake of Hurricane Fran, and publicity materials are also included in the collection.

The collection consists of a group of albums and binders that document SWOOP's projects, and a series of materials that document the group's organizational history. The albums contain photographs that document project work days, as well as descriptions of the projects and their locations. The binders contain correspondence with partner organizations and other relevant parties, information about ongoing projects, as well as newsletters and notices about upcoming events and projects. The administrative files comprise mostly board meeting materials, as well as newspaper clippings and publicity.

Collection
Harriet Elisabeth Beecher Stowe (1811 June 14-1896 July 1) was an American abolitionist and author. Collection comprises an introduction and a letter written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, along with a carte de visite of her. There is an undated introduction she wrote for the second edition of Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Stowe's statement appears as an introduction in some copies of the 1853 edition. In the introduction, Stowe discusses the African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, remarking on her mental energy and revelatory powers as a Christian, and attests to Truth's character. She then mentions that the sales of the work will "secure a home for [Truth in] her old age ..." There is an undated letter Stowe wrote from Northampton Depot on Aug. 10 to Mr. Ward, informing him that although she is disposed to support his request, she is under pressures that limit her use of the pen. The carte de visite features a textured surface, and was created by the Howell studio in New York.

Collection comprises an introduction and a letter written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, along with a carte de visite of her. There is an undated introduction she wrote for the second edition of Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Stowe's statement appears as an introduction in some copies of the 1853 edition. In the introduction, Stowe discusses the African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, remarking on her mental energy and revelatory powers as a Christian, and attests to Truth's character. She then mentions that the sales of the work will "secure a home for [Truth in] her old age ..." There is an undated letter Stowe wrote from Northampton Depot on Aug. 10 to Mr. Ward, informing him that although she is disposed to support his request, she is under pressures that limit her use of the pen. The carte de visite features a textured surface, and was created by the Howell studio in New York.

Collection

Stone Circles records, 1995-2012 11.4 Linear Feet — 19 boxes

The Stone Circles records contain materials documenting the history of the organization. These include press clippings, board meeting minutes. staff and financial information, program files, newsletters, event information, and correspondence.

Established in 1995, Stone Circles is a leading organization in the national movement toward a more spiritually-based form of activism. SC has introduced thousands of social change leaders and organizations to spiritual and reflective practice through workshops, retreats, trainings and strategic convenings. Stone Circles at the Stone House is located in Mebane, NC on 70 acres of farmland.

Collection
Collection comprises a letter Stokes wrote to dramatist Benjamin Butler Davenport regarding her plan to attend his play "The Silent Assertion" with her husband. Includes enclosure.
Collection
Amelia Stinson-Wesley is an ordained Methodist minister and advocate for pastoral care of women and abuse survivors in North Carolina. Her papers consist of correspondence, academic writing, periodical excerpts, pamphlets, flyers, and handouts.

Amelia Stinson-Wesley is an ordained Methodist minister and advocate for pastoral care of women and abuse survivors. Her papers consist of correspondence, academic writing, periodical excerpts, pamphlets, flyers, and handouts.

Collection
Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815 November 12-1902 October 26) was an American suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women's rights movement. Collection contains four signed letters written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton to various correspondents.

Collection contains four signed letters written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton to various correspondents. The first, dated [1880s] May 9 from New York, was written in response to a letter by a Miss Ives regarding a misunderstanding between them over articles or interviews written for The World and The Recorder; includes a transcription. In the second, dated 1881 April 26 from Tenafly, N.J., Stanton wrote to William Russel Dudley regarding his position, as well as her son Theodore's amicably-ended engagement to Miss White, daughter of Cornell University President Andrew Dickson White, and his plans to marry another. In the third letter, dated 1883 Dec. 10 from Geneva, N.Y., Stanton wrote to Courtland Palmer, declining an invitation address the first meeting of the Century Club, and regretting that she was not apprised in time to change her travel plans, as she had just returned from Europe; item is mounted.

In the fourth letter, Stanton wrote to Edgar F. Gladwin on July 28 [no year provided] from Tenafly, N.J., answering his question, if she thinks "that the cause of woman suffrage would be greatly advanced if the generalty [sic] of women gave their active approval." She answers "Most assuredly" and goes on to mention how the lives of Turkish and Mormon women would change if they repudiated the social practices of their societies. Stanton then goes on to state that the reason women in the United States do not wholeheartedly support suffrage is because of theology: "They accept what is taught them by holy men at the altar. Believing... woman an afterthought in the creation; the author of sin; cursed in her maternity, marriage for her a condition of slavery, she's prepared for any form of degradation. Hence until the majority are emancipated from the old theologies they will never demand political freedom. My present endeavor is to turn my guns on the church."

Collection
Madame de Staël (1766-1817) was a French literary figure whose writings were highly influential in late 18th and early 19th century Europe. She was a political polemicist whose famous confrontation with Napoléon Bonaparte led to her exile from Paris until the Bourbon Restoration. This letter was written in 1814 towards the end of her life. She writes from Paris to the prominent New York mercantile firm LeRoy, Bayard & McEvers concerning a financial transaction in the amount of $20,000. She states that she has transferred the sum to McEvers in London, and wishes to confirm that they will, in turn, transfer it to her account with another firm. At the time she wrote this letter, Madame de Staël owned a large tract of land in upstate New York. Her father originally purchased the land in the event that the family wanted to escape France's instability and settle in America. Although she and her children never moved to the United States, de Staël both increased her land holdings and invested in developing her property. LeRoy, Bayard & McEvers represented Europeans purchasing property in New York State, so it's highly likely that the $20,000 was used to either increase or develop Madame de Staël's American land holdings. This letter is evidence of a degree of financial and business independence that was highly unusual for a woman at the time.

Collection consists of a single one page autograph manuscript letter from Madame de Staël to the firm LeRoy, Bayard & McEvers in New York City regarding a financial transaction of $20,000. The letter is dated 1814 October 12; a note on the back states that it was received in New York 1815 March 10. In the letter, de Staël writes that she is sending their partner in London, Mr. McEvers, a note for $20,000. She asks if they have received her letter of July 25 in which she asked them to transfer the $20,000 to her account with the firm Doxat & Divett, and reiterates this request in the event that they have not received it. The letter is signed Necker de Staël Holstein. At the time, Madame de Staël owned an estimated 30,000 acres of land in what is now upstate New York, (Sakolski) and it's likely that this transaction was related to her American property holdings. Madame de Staël's father purchased land in America for his daughter and her children with the thought of leaving unstable France and settling in America. Although she never lived there, de Staël increased her American land holdings and reportedly invested $20,000 in developing the property. -- Sakolski, The Great American Land Bubble (1932)

Collection
The Spirella Corset Company was founded in 1904 in Meadville, Pennsylvania, by Marcus Merritt Beeman, William Wallace Kincaid and Jesse Homan Pardee, to manufacture made-to-measure women's corsets and other foundation garments. The firm utilized a force of women sales personnel who directly contacted consumers for fittings and garment orders; the brand was not sold in retail outlets. The collection consists of brochures, catalogs, deposit forms, sales ordering and fitting instructions and other printed materials, along with a sample corset used for demonstrations. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History & Culture.

Collection consists of brochures, catalogs, deposit forms, sales ordering and fitting instructions and other printed materials, along with a sample corset used for demonstrations.

Collection
Southern Feminist, Inc. was an organization in Athens, GA from 1984-1989 that served as a communications device for women's political activism in the southern states. Their records consist chiefly of administrative files, which includes correspondence, article drafts, and subscription information. Also included is a group of feminist periodicals including Southern Feminist.

The collection includes the records of the periodical The Southern Feminist, which was founded by editor and publisher Sharron Hannon in Athens.The records of Southern Feminist Inc. chiefly consist of sdministrative files, such as correspondence, drafts of articles, subscription files. Printed materials are mostly feminist peridocals and include issues of The Southern Feminist and The Southern Feminist Extra.

Collection
Online
According to the organization's website, Southerners on New Ground (SONG) is an intersectional activist organization that works to build, connect, and sustain those in the South who believe in liberation across all lines of race, class, culture, gender and sexuality. It was established in 1994 following a National Lesbian and Gay Task Force meeting. SONG is currently headquartered in Atlanta with regional offices across the South. The accession (2009-0098) (9.6 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2004) includes administrative and financial records, programming materials, and organizational files, all stemming from retreats, training, workshops, and community events sponsored or promoted by SONG. The accession also includes SONG materials from the Bayard Rustin project, People of Color activities, Pride at Work, and the Highlander Economy Educational Institute, among others. The accession (2015-0113) (2.9 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2015) was donated by Caitlin Breedlove, Co-Director of SONG from 2006-2015. It includes administrative and financial records, programming information, flyers and promotional materials and research related to campaign initiatives from her time in the SONG leadership.

The accession (2009-0098) (9.6 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2004) includes administrative and financial records, programming materials, and organizational files, all stemming from retreats, training, workshops, and community events sponsored or promoted by SONG. The accession also includes SONG materials from the Bayard Rustin project, People of Color activities, Pride at Work, and the Highlander Economy Educational Institute, among others.

The accession (2015-0113) (2.9 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2015) was donated by Caitlin Breedlove, Co-Director of SONG from 2006-2015. It includes administrative and financial records, programming information, flyers and promotional materials and research related to campaign initiatives from her time in the SONG leadership. The accession also contains cards and artwork given to Caitlin by others, assorted photographs from events, two interview recordings, and many of her personal notebooks.

Collection
Marilyn Crafton Smith is a retired faculty member at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC whose collection includes documentation of the activities of the National Organization for Women, the fight for the Equal Rights Amendment, feminism in Western North Carolina, and LGBT printed matter.

Materials documenting the life and work of scholar, activist, and collector of feminist and LGBTQ print culture including student work, teaching files, clippings, Boone Area and Iowa City National Organization for Women (NOW) files, Western NC LGBTQ organization and event files,Southeastern Women's Studies Association (SEWSA) files, Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) files, Center for Research on Women (Duke and Memphis State University) files, social movement t-shirts, magazines, newspapers, journals, pamphlets, and books; and a Bride Bingo game.

Collection
A native of Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, Margaret Taylor Smith attended Duke University from 1943-1947. After graduating with a degree in sociology, Smith and her husband relocated to Birmingham, Michigan. Smith raised four children while taking an active part in her community through volunteer work and leadership. Smith's work as a research associate studying family life became the basis for a 1987 book, Mother, I Have Something to Tell You. Smith served as the chair of the Board of Trustees of the Kresge Foundation, a national organization that awards grants to support non-profit organizations. In addition, Smith continues her commitment to Duke University by holding leadership positions on multiple boards, by acting as a founding member and chair of the Council on Women's Studies, and by enabling the creation of the Sarah W. and George N. Taylor Endowment Fund for women's leadership and the Margaret Taylor Smith Endowed Directorship for Women's Studies. The Margaret Taylor Smith Papers contain materials dating from 1918 to 2010, with the bulk dating between 1980 and 2008. The collection documents Smith's voluntarism, leadership, and philanthropic activities at Duke University, especially in women's studies; her sociological research on American families, specifically relationships between mothers and children, that resulted in the publication of a book, Mother I Have Something To Tell You; her social and family life; and her professional activities and voluntarism, particularly at the Kresge Foundation. The collection is organized into five series: Duke University, Mother, I Have Something To Tell You, Personal Papers, Professional Voluntarism, and Additions.

The Margaret Taylor Smith Papers contain materials dating from 1918 to 2010, with the bulk dating between 1980 and 2008. The collection documents Smith's voluntarism, leadership, and philanthropic activities at Duke University, especially in women's studies; her sociological research that resulted in the publication of a book; her social and family life; and her professional activities and voluntarism, particularly at the Kresge Foundation. Smith's original folder titles were retained. Smith, an avid note taker, often recorded information on the exterior of folders and manila envelopes. These folders were retained and appear in the collection. The collection is organized into five series: Duke University, Mother, I Have Something To Tell You, Personal Papers, Professional Voluntarism, and Additions.

The Duke University Series comprises materials related to Smith's leadership and professional voluntarism at the university, including correspondence, event planning notes, meeting minutes, endowment information, and speeches.

The Mother, I Have Something To Tell You Series documents the publication of the 1987 book, authored by Jo Brans, based on Smith's sociological research that describes how mothers deal with children who display untraditional behavior. Specifically, Smith researched American families whose children challenged social and sexual mores during the 1960s and 1970s. The series contains correspondence, drafts, speeches, and Smith's research related to the book, including the mothers' subject files, which typically contain written transcripts of Smith's interviews with the women, both with and without Smith's notes, questionnaires and sociological data, and audiocassette recordings of the interviews. Original audio recordings are closed to research. Use copies need to be created before contents can be accessed.

Materials related to Smith's social and family life are located in the Personal Papers Series, which primarily comprises correspondence with family, friends, and some professional associates, but also includes photographs, newspaper clippings, ephemera from Smith's days as an undergraduate at Duke University, and her father's World War I diary.

The Professional Voluntarism Series contains materials documenting Smith's professional activities, including awards, correspondence, speaking engagements, subject files, voluntarism, and philanthropy. The series particularly highlights Smith's work as the chair of the Board of Trustees of the Kresge Foundation, a national organization that awards grants to support non-profit organizations; her volunteer work with the Junior League; and her interest in ethics and ethical dilemmas.

Later Additions have not been processed. Accession (2010-0066) contains email correspondence. Accession (2010-0135) includes addition research materials, correspondence, proposals, and other miscellaneous notes. Accession (2010-0164) includes correspondence regarding the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture; the Duke University Women's Studies department; Smith's Class of 1947 and their reunions; and other miscellaneous materials and notes.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

The way it was, or at least how I remember experiencing it, 1980-1986 0.6 Linear Feet — 1 upright hollinger, 1 upright half-hollinger — 956 typescript pages

Collection comprises Lola Frances Wilson Smith's 920-page typescript autobiography, including Wilson and Carroll family history, focusing on the period between 1909, when her parents married, and 1944, when she gave birth to her first child. Includes an additional 36 pages of introductory material where Smith describes herself. Smith accompanies her narrative with hand-drawn maps and illustrations or photocopies of illustrative material from other sources. She also includes copies of documents (marriage licenses, government documents, certificates, etc.) obituaries, genealogical charts, newspaper articles, family photographs, and private letters. Pages 885 to 920 are included as representative of Smith's working draft for the piece.
Collection

Amanda Smith papers, 1950s-2000s 16 Linear Feet — 12000 Items

Author (fiction and non-fiction) and gender equity consultant from Durham, N.C. Collection includes materials from Smith's literary career as an author of mystery novels, files from her work as a gender equity consultant, her newspaper columns on gender in the workplace, and materials from her work with youth at St. Philip's Episcopal Church in Durham. Also includes a small amount of correspondence from Smith's college years and family photographs from the early 20th century. The files relating to her fiction writing also include a set of audiocassettes related to one of her books. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes materials from Smith's literary career as an author of mystery novels, files from her work as a gender equity consultant, her newspaper columns on gender in the workplace, and materials from her work with youth at St. Philip's Episcopal Church in Durham. Also includes a small amount of correspondence from Smith's college years and family photographs from the early 20th century. The files relating to her fiction writing also include a set of audiocassettes related to one of her books. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Agnes Smedley letters, 1930s-1947 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Agnes Smedley was a journalist, writer, and left-wing activist remembered for her activity on behalf of the Communist cause in China during the 1930s. It is believed that she engaged in extensive espionage activities while she lived in Shanghai from 1929-1941. The Agnes Smedley letters consist of three letters by Smedley, the first of which was written while she lived in Shanghai, and the second two while she lived at the Yaddo artists' colony during the 1940s. The first letter is a request for a social engagement, and the second two letters discuss the particulars of her political observations and writings while she lived and worked in China.

The collection consists of three letters written by Agnes Smedley; the first to a Miss Gates, and the second two addressed to Corporal James A. Frankel. The single-page autograph manuscript letter to Miss Gates is written on letterhead stationery with Smedley's Shanghai address identifying her as the "Correspondent of the Frankfurter Zeitung in China." She asks Miss Gates to have "tiffin or tea" with her and wonders "Do you ever have extra time to see strange people?" The second manuscript letter, two leaves with text on all four sides, is dated December 27th, 1944. It primarily concerns Emily Hahn's book "China To Me." Smedley writes, “Miss Hahn spent 9 years sleeping around in Shanghai ... When the Japs took Hong Kong she wrote that she would just have died had she gone to a concentration camp like other Americans. So she went to the Japs and said, 'I’m a bad girl.' So the Japs left her free and she fooled around with them in Hong Kong, drinking and carousing, while the bastards were killing our men... But we Americans find this 'hot stuff' and put it up as a best seller... Miss Hahn is a propagandist for the Chinese reaction. She’s never seen a Chinese Communist, yet she’s agitating against them in N.Y... She led a purely personal life in two Chinese port cities but now poses as an authority on political and military matters of China." The third letter, autograph typescript dated March 23d 1947, was originally enclosed in Frankel’s copy of Smedley's book Battle Hymn of China, and addresses Frankel's questions about the Xi'an Incident of 1936 and the capture of Chiang Kai-shek. Smedley directs Frankel to her article on the topic published in The Nation magazine, as well as "her book."

Collection

Clarissa Sligh papers, 1950-2010 70 Linear Feet — 51307 Items

Artist and author of works such as Wrongly Bodied, Reading Dick and Jane with Me, What's Happening With Momma? Jake in Transition, and It Wasn't Little Rock. Collection includes materials relating to Sligh's career as an artist, with particular focus on her various projects and exhibitions in the 1980s, 1990s, and early 2000s. Projects represented include Jake In Transition/Wrongly Bodied, Witness to Dissent/It Wasn't Little Rock, Coast to Coast, Sandy Ground, Malcolm X: Man, Ideal, Icon, What's Happening With Momma? and an NC Reunion/Slavery project, along with several others. Sligh's files frequently include correspondence, research materials, drafts of essays and exhibition plans, clippings and other source materials, contact sheets and slides, and occasionally exhibit pieces and texts from the actual installation. Other items included in the collection are exhibition binders and scrapbooks kept by Sligh to document her career; correspondence and communication between Sligh and other artists, galleries, or publishers; catalogs and publicity materials from Sligh's many exhibitions, shows, and publications, artists' books, materials documenting Sligh's art and process, large framed photographic prints; and other materials. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Clarissa Sligh Papers have been divided into 8 series: Binders and Catalogs, Projects, Correspondence, Journals and Notepads, Photographs, and Artists' Book Dummies and Drafts, Jake in Transition, and Accession 2013-0149.

The Binders and Catalogs series includes a selection of exhibition binders, kept and collected by Sligh as a record of her various projects, events, and exhibits. Also includes press clippings, museum catalogs, and other programming materials. Items have been removed from their original binders.

The Projects series includes files from many of Sligh's art and research projects, relating to a variety of topics such as slavery, civil rights, genealogy, gender studies, and African American history. A "project" may include materials from an installation, artist book, exhibit, or all of these formats. Sligh's work frequently evolved over time and expanded in scope and format. This series also includes files from Sligh's exhibitions and publications. Major projects documented include: NC Reunion and Slavery Project, a film related to the Artists' Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, Jake in Transition/Wrongly Bodied, Coast to Coast, Witness to Dissent, Sandy Ground, and Malcolm X: Man, Ideal, Icon.

The Correspondence Series contains three subseries of correspondence: the first has been sorted in loose chronological order according to Sligh's own folder arrangements; the second contains Sligh's self-designated "to do," "answered," "unanswered," and other unsorted correspondence; the third has files that are arranged alphabetically by subject or correspondent's name.

The Journals and Notepads Series includes a set of legal notepads kept by Sligh during the late 1990s. Many entries related to her work on Jake in Transition, but the journals also include Sligh's discussions and reflections on other projects and artwork.

The Photographs Series includes images of artwork and installations by Sligh, portraits of Sligh, and portraits and snapshots of family and friends.

The Artists Books Dummies and Drafts Series includes mockups and drafts from the production of Wrongly Bodied; It Wasn't Little Rock; Malcolm X; Reading Dick and Jane with Me (including "Play with Jane" print); What's Happening with Momma? and alternate version of this book called Girlchild; Hiroshima, Hopes and Dreams; and Voyage(r): Tourist Map to Japan.

The Jake in Transition series consists of photographic prints.

Accession 2012-0149 is an addition consisting of Sligh's documentation of her work and process, photographs and negatives, large screen prints, and political posters.

Collection

Edith Sitwell poems, circa 1940-1950 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Dame Edith Sitwell was a British poet and critic whose work helped usher in the modernist era of British poetry. This autograph manuscript contains the text of two of her poems: "Lullaby" and "Serenade: From Any Man to Any Woman." Both poems were inspired by the early years of World War II and were published in her 1942 collection "Street Songs."

The five leaf holograph manuscript with text on the front side of each numbered page consists of two poems both titled at the top and signed "Edith" at the bottom. Both poems, "Lullaby," and "Serenade: Any Man to Any Woman" appeared in her 1942 collection "Street Songs." In this manuscript, "Serenade" is titled "Any Man to Any Woman." Both were inspired by the early years of World War II and are ironically titled. "Lullaby," sung by a baboon, describes a chaotic, primeval world destroyed by wartime chaos and despair in which, "All is equal - blindness, sight/There is no depth, there is no height." "Serenade" spoken by a dying soldier, regards his love through the lens of death and destruction. He identifies his love with a cannon and invites her to "die with me and be my love" in a reversal of the famous Marlowe line.

Both poems are referenced in the Edith Sitwell papers at the Ransom Humanities Center. Viewed March 9, 2017

Source: Misko, Ellen, "A Study of Dame Edith Sitwell's Later Poems: 1940-1945" (1972). Dissertations. Paper 1211. Viewed March 9, 2017

Collection
Dawn Langley Simmons (1937-2000), was a British author. She started her career editing newspaper society columns and went on to become a prolific biographer and the author of Man Into Women: A Transsexual Autobiography (1971). The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Queen Silver papers, 1891-1995 1.6 Linear Feet — 96 items

Queen Silver (1910-1998), a life-long resident of Los Angeles, California, was known from a young age as a Freethinker (atheist), feminist, and socialist. Collection includes letters, clippings, broadsides, flyers, a pamphlet, and black-and-white photographs, some mounted, as well as two color photographs.

Collection includes letters, clippings, broadsides, flyers, a pamphlet, and black-and-white photographs, some mounted, as well as two color photographs. Much of the material relates to Silver's lectures on humanist topics, but in addition to letters by Silver there are also letters from an admirer, a teacher, and from her mother. Items predating Silver's birth include a broadside for a speech by and photographs of her mother.

Collection

Lydia Howard Sigourney letter, undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a handwritten letter Lydia Howard Sigourney drafted as Secretary for the Hartford Ladies' Association for supplicating justice and mercy towards [sic?] the Indians, to request assistance with the circulation of a petition among the women of Hartford. The letter also discusses the political process behind the petition and its circulation. Includes a faint handwritten addendum, written in another person's hand, noting a decision not to send the letter. The item is undated, but possibly dates to the 1830s.
Collection

Alix Kates Shulman papers, 1892-2014, bulk 1968-2014 39.5 Linear Feet — 29,625 Items

Online
Prominent feminist, author, and political activist in the 1960s and 70s. Author of MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN (1972), ON THE STROLL (1980), and DRINKING THE RAIN (1995). The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to 2000). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to the present). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Other topics covered by the collection include: her teaching and other academic work; her public speaking and conference activities; and her involvement in political activities besides feminism. This collection sheds valuable light on the concerns and tensions within the women's liberation and second-wave feminist movements. In particular, the materials document debates and disagreements among those active in the movement with regard to sexuality, marriage and domestic relations, women's financial situation and careers, health care, civil rights and cultural expression. Many of these issues are raised in Shulman's own work, including her novels, essays, short fiction, personal letters and her teaching materials.

The collection is divided into seven series. The Personal Papers Series contains Shulman's family history papers, photographs, biographical papers, and her personal correspondence (with writers, academics, political activists and family members). Notable correspondents include Ros Baxandall, Jay Bolotin, Kay Boyle, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Judy Chicago, Andrea Dworkin, Candace Falk, Marilyn French, Lori Ginzberg, Hannah Green, Erica Jong, Kate Millett, Honor Moore, Robin Morgan, Tillie Olson, Lillian Rubin, Sue Standing, and Meredith Tax. The Political Work Series contains material relating to Shulman's involvement with feminist and other liberal political groups, including Redstockings, New York Radical Women, the PEN Women's Committee, No More Nice Girls, the Women's Action Coalition, and Women Against Government Surveillance

The Literary Work Series contains a variety of materials relating to Shulman's literary career, including financial and other dealings with publishing houses, notes and research, photocopies of publications, reviews of her work, articles and notes she collected regarding the literary scene, and original manuscripts. This series contains information about her early children's books; several books she edited of Emma Goldman's writings; her essays and short fiction; her novels Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen (1972), Burning Questions (1975), On the Stroll (1977), In Every Woman's Life . . . (1980); and her memoirs Drinking the Rain (1995) and A Good Enough Daughter (1999). A small amount of correspondence regarding book reviews of other authors' work is also included.

The Academic Work Series contains materials relating to Shulman's graduate work at NYU; her teaching at Yale, the University of Colorado at Boulder, NYU, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa; as well as her relationships with her students. The Public Speaking Series contains materials relating to Shulman's participation in literary and political conferences and gatherings, personal interviews, lectures and book talks.

Portions of the Restricted Materials Series either may not be photocopied without prior permission of Ms. Shulman or the relevant author, or may not be accessed until a future date. The same organizational categories have been applied to the restricted materials as were used in the unrestricted materials to help researchers easily access overlapping and related materials that have been boxed separately due to the restrictions. The Oversize Materials Series contains miscellaneous oversize materials of a biographical and literary nature.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Single, typescript letter dated 1900 January 4. The journalist, editor, collector, and Brontë expert Clement Shorter writes to thank Mrs. F.L.E. Bellfield for a book which he found helpful for his research. Shorter was in the process of editing a new edition of Elizabeth Gaskell's Life of Charlotte Brontë, originally published in 1899. Also mentioned is a forthcoming new edition of The Life of Charlotte Brontë and her sisters, edited by Mrs. Ward Humphry.

The collection consists of a single page typescript letter dated 1900 January 4 on The Sphere newspaper's letterhead. Clement Shorter writes to Mrs. F.L.E. Bellfield to thank her for giving him a book which he found helpful in his preparation for a new edition of Elizabeth Gaskell's Life of Charlotte Brontë that he was in the process of editing. The letter also mentions a forthcoming new edition published by Smith & Elder of The Life and Works of Charlotte Brontë, edited by Mrs. Ward Humphry and with an introduction by Shorter.

Collection
Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick (1950-2009) was a literary critic, teacher, artist, and poet. She is best remembered as one of the founders of the field of queer theory. Her work on sexuality influences our continuted understanding of contemporary culture. This collection contains materials that document her scholarly career, her visual art, and her personal life. It includes drafts and copies of her published and unpublished works, her correspondence, research files, and teaching materials, as well as her visual artwork, and some documentation of her personal life, particularly her experience living with breast cancer. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Materials in this collection include writings and speeches, writings of others, notebooks and calendars, research, teaching, and activism files, event and travel files, correspondence, photographs, memorabilia, legal, medical, and financial materials, books and other published material, as well as her paper, textile, clay, glass, ceramic, and other artworks.

The materials reflect the scope of Sedgwick's work, which includes queer theory, queer performativity, feminist theory, Buddhism, psychoanalysis, Proust, experimental writing, critical pedagogy, artists' books, and fabric and textile art.

Collection

Anne Firor Scott papers, 1939-2009 19 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

The collection contains writings of Anne Firor Scott and materials relating to her academic work in Southern and women's history. The materials primarily refer to her scholarly activities, and include her dissertation, occasional papers, articles, speeches and lectures, book reviews, contracts, conference proceedings and schedules, course materials, newspaper clippings, and other activities related to academia. There is also a file of correspondence written by Anna Lord Strauss (then president of the League of Women Voters) in 1949 and mailed to all members the league. Notes by Scott in this file explain her connection to Strauss, and the circumstances of the correspondence. In addition, there are newspaper articles related to the first and second editions of Scott's book, The Southern Lady. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Preliminary container lists exist for only parts of the collection.

Collection
Hannah L. Schmitt was a camper at Michigamme girls camp in Michigamme, Mich., in the Upper Peninsula. Schmitt was born in Toledo, Ohio. Collection comprises a cloth-bound photograph album maintained by Schmitt when she attended Camp Michigamme, beginning in 1920. The album contains 243 black-and-white photographs, most measuring 4x2.5 inches. Images document camp life, and show Hannah and other young women living in tents, canoeing, swimming, playing sports, cleaning, entertaining themselves, reading and relaxing.

Collection comprises a cloth-bound photograph album maintained by Schmitt when she attended Camp Michigamme, beginning in 1920. The album contains 243 black-and-white photographs, most measuring 4x2.5 inches. Images document camp life, and show Hannah and other young women living in tents, canoeing, swimming, playing sports, cleaning, entertaining themselves, reading and relaxing. Places visited mentioned are Baldy, Pequaming, Sand Island, and Flat Island. Almost all of the images have captions written by Schmitt; several of them were later inked in color. There is also a photograph of the Hebard's Mill at Pequaming, Michigan, the mill that Ford Motor Company purchased in 1923. Photographs on several pages in the back of the album are of Schmitt family members, and were taken outside of the camp. A number of the images were developed by a Michigan company named "Forster's-Calumet." In addition to the photographs, the album contains some manuscript items, including notes, poetry, a Western Union Telegram (regarding Schmitt's relationship with a West Point Cadet), along with a 7-page story that represents each camper and staff member as clouds at dawn.

Collection
Sarabande Books is a non-profit literary press publishing poetry and fiction. The Sarabande Books records include materials documenting the founding of the company as well as yearly publishing materials.

This collection (accession #2000-0306) (4150 items, dated 1992-1996) documents the founding of the company. Many files mention editor and president Sarah Gorham and include start-up files, correspondence and author files, marketing materials, financial records, and other materials generated by the press. Also includes Gorham's memoir written during the first days of the press; files on prizes offered by the press (the Mary McCarthy Prize for short fiction and the Kathryn A. Morthon Prize for poetry); correspondence with authors Jane Mead, Lee Martin, Richard Frost, Sharon Bryan, Laura Jenson, Medbh McGuckian, and Liliana Ursu; and correspondence with Sallie Bingham about the formation of the press. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2001-0022) (2911 items, 4.4 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) continues to document the company's activities. Materials include correspondence files; author files; sales and marketing files; 24 color and 4 black-and-white photographs; 11 electronic (computer) files; and material relating to Sarabande's non-profit operations from 1996 to 1997. Much of the correspondence tracks letters to and from Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham. Authors represented include Dick Allen, Brian Griffin, Sharon Solwitz, Belle Waring, and Baron Wormser.

Addition (2002-0062) (2260 items, 6.3 linear feet; dated 1996-1998) comprises primarily author binders, files, and correspondence (1996-1998); and marketing and sales records, including examples of advertisements and reviews (1998). Also includes correspondence between Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham (1998); poetry and fiction galleys; documents related to the press' nonprofit activities, including 2 audio cassette tapes and paper records documenting board meetings (1998); 2 color and 10 black-and-white photographs and 1 black-and-white negative; and 18 electronic (computer) files originally received on one 3.5" diskette. Authors represented include Cathleen Hagenston, James Kimbrell, Stefanie Marlis, Shara McCallum, Jean Valentine, and Kate Walbert.

Addition (2003-0021) (2,300 items, 5.30 linear feet; dated 1995-2002) consists largely of author files (1997-2000) and printed material comprising journals and review publications (1998-1999). Also includes office correspondence (1995-2002); sales analyses, grant proposals, and marketing files (1996-2001); and documents related to conferences and events, special projects, board meetings, and nonprofit activities.

Addition (2004-0018) (4000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2001) includes author binders and files, correspondence, financial and marketing archives, and manuscript galleys. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2005-0019) (3695 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2001) primarily comprises authors' binders, including incoming and outgoing correspondence, as well as typescript drafts and galleys. Also includes reviews, press releases, and advertisements; notes from sales conferences and board meetings; consortium sales analyses; a non-profit activity file; and organizational materials for Sarabande-in-Education, a website program for college students and teachers. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2006-0025) (3,750 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2002) comprises correspondence, drafts, galleys, marketing and biographical files, contracts, press releases, and book reviews. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2007-0041) (6,000 items, 9.2 lin. ft.; dated 1996-2003) contains autographed books, authors' files, manuscripts, the contents of author binders, marketing files, board meeting files, nonprofit activitiy files, Lila Wallace materials, sales kits, a Writer's Almanac CD, and a Sallie Bingham rehearsal tape for Short Fiction Series.

Addition (2008-0028) (4,500 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains author files, correspondence, marketing files and galleys for books published in 2004-2005. Also included are 2 CDR's of the Writer's Almanac.

Addition (2009-0092) (8325 items; 11.1 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2009) includes administrative files, book reviews, press releases, author files and correspondence, and manuscripts and drafts from authors published by Sarabande.

Addition (2010-0028) (9000 items; 12.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2010) includes administrative files, Sarabande correspondence with authors, author files, poetry and fiction finalists, and various book reviews and advertisements.

Addition (2011-0076) (6750 items; 9.0 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2011) includes materials from conferences, non-profit activities, grants, correspondence, marketing, staffing, finances, and author files.

Addition (2012-0046) (3188 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2011) includes correspondence, publicity files, author files, and manuscripts.

Addition (2013-0158) (5625 items; 7.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2012) includes author files, reviews, manuscripts, author correspondence and administrative materials.

Addition (2015-0150) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2014) includes administrative materials and author correspondence, foundation research and correspondence, and author files.

Addition (2015-0151) (2250 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2009-2015) includes administrative files, author files and author binders.

Addition (2016-0311) (3.0 lin. ft; dated 2011-2016) consists chiefly of author files. Also contains files related to prizes and awards.

Addition (2018-0011) (4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2016-2018) consists of publicity and author files that contain drafts of recently published works.

Addition (2019-0093) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2015-2017) consists of author files, including Sallie Bingham's publishing agreement and drafts of works.

Addition 2021-0075 (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2019-2020) includes author files for books published in 2019 and 2020, Sarabande Writing Labs brochure, 2019 and 2020 catalogs, press releases and reviews for 2019 and 2020 books, and annual reports.

Addition 2022-0084 (3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1990 and 2010-2022) includes author files, Sarabande Writing Labs anthologies, catalogs, promotional ephemera, a poetry broadsides.

Collection
The Margaret Sanger letter to Vachel Linsday regards a request from the contraception activist to the poet asking him to write a statement of support to be read at an upcoming birth control conference. Linsday responds by writing a note at the bottom of Sanger's letter replying that he wishes to father "twelve sons seven feet high" with the famously long-haired Seven Sutherland Sisters. The accompanying pamphlet contains the program for the upcoming conference.

The collection consists of a single-page typescript autograph letter from Margaret Sanger to the poet Vachel Lindsay with an autograph manuscript note at the bottom and an accompanying single-sheet folded pamphlet. The pamphlet contains the program for the Sixth International Neo-Malthusian and Birth Control Conference held in New York March 25-31, 1925; the letter is composed on matching letterhead and addressed to Lindsay care of the Macmillan Company in New York. In the letter, Sanger asks Lindsay if he would be willing to compose a message of support to be read at the conference. Lindsay sent the letter back to Sanger with a playful manuscript note by way of reply at the bottom signed Nicholas Vachel Lindsay. His response states that he wants "twelve sons, seven feet high," and that the best way to get them would be "to marry the Seven Sutherland Sisters, as long-haired women have long-legged sons." He concludes by asking Sanger if she knows where the Sisters happen to be at the time. The Seven Sutherland Sisters were famously long-haired and traveled with Barnum and Bailey as a family singing act. In a 1926 letter to the poet Sara Teasdale, Lindsay's wife Elizabeth refers to this as "his famous response" to the Neo-Malthusian Conference.

Source: The Annotated Letters of Nicholas Vachel Linsday to Sara Trevor Teasdale http://www.vachellindsay.org/LetterstoSara/vl_letters_210_241.pdf; viewed March 9, 2017

Collection
Collection contains a letter from George Sand to Juliette Lamber, written 18 August 1867 at Sand's Nohant estate. The letter discusses possible plans to meet. Also, Sand acknowledges that she has been depressed by the death of her dear friend François Rollinat, and hopes their meeting can help her find courage to live. In a postscript, she adds that she has read Lamber's THE MANDARIN, and that Lamber has the elements of a serious talent. Includes an enclosure for the letter, as well as an English transcription.

Collection contains a letter from George Sand to Juliette Lamber, written 18 August 1867 at Sand's Nohant estate. The letter discusses possible plans to meet. Also, Sand acknowledges that she has been depressed by the death of her dear friend François Rollinat, and hopes their meeting can help her find courage to live. In a postscript, she adds that she has read Lamber's THE MANDARIN, and that Lamber has the elements of a serious talent. Includes an enclosure for the letter, as well as an English transcription.

Collection
Marlene Sanders (b. 1931) is a female pioneer in broadcasting and an Emmy Award–winning correspondent, writer, producer, and broadcast-news executive. Collection contains eight VHS video tapes (VHS) regarding various aspects of feminism, especially its modern history. Some videotapes were created at the 30th Anniversary of the National Organization for Women in 1996. The others are dated 1997, and most include the series title "Veteran Feminists of America" on the label; one tape has "Choices--Meded: 25 Years of Choices." Accompanying the recordings is one published volume: Waiting for Prime Time: the Women of Television News.

Collection contains eight VHS video tapes (VHS) regarding various aspects of feminism, especially its modern history. Some videotapes were created at the 30th Anniversary of the National Organization for Women in 1996. The others are dated 1997, and most include the series title "Veteran Feminists of America" on the label; one tape has "Choices--Meded: 25 Years of Choices." Accompanying the recordings is one published volume: Waiting for Prime Time: the Women of Television News

Collection
Jenny Zervakis was part of a wave of underground, do-it-yourself cartoonists who came of age during the Zine Revolution of the 1990s. Collection consists largely of issues of her "Strange Growths" autobiographical comic zine and "Urban Hiker," a Durham magazine to which Zervakis regularly contributed. Also included in the collection are other comics and writings by Zervakis, as well as an artist's statement. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists largely of issues of "Strange Growths" and "Urban Hiker." "Strange Growths" is an autobiographical comic zine that Zervakis began in 1991, featuring artwork and writing that address her life experiences. The "Urban Hiker" was a community-based magazine produced in Durham that provided entertainment and education through people's stories. Also included in the collection are other comics and writings by Zervakis, as well as an artist's statement.

Collection

Batya Weinbaum papers, 1960-2015 46.5 Linear Feet — 82 boxes — 1.4 Gigabytes

Batya Weinbaum is a Jewish American artist, musician, poet, author, editor and professor. In addition to founding and editing the interdisciplinary feminist journal Femspec, she has published 17 books and more than 250 articles, poems, essays and reviews. She has made significant contributions to the fields of multiculturalism, women's studies, sexuality studies and education. The Batya Weinbaum papers consist of 83 boxes, spanning the years 1960-2015, and document a significant portion of her personal and professional history. The collection contains substantial materials related to Weinbaum's writing and research, including drafts of her books, materials related to the journal Femspec, and several decades of journals and sketchbooks.

This collection documents Weinbaum's personal life, education and professional life. The Batya Weinbaum papers are arranged into the following thirteen series: Legal, Correspondence, Press, Activities, Research and Scholarship, Art, Writing, Teaching, Photography, Print Materials, Journals, Family Memorabilia and Audiovisual Materials.

The first series largely documents Weinbuam's lawsuit against Cleveland State University from 2004-2006. The second series contains correspondence primarily related to Weinbaim's teaching and publications, but also has personal correspondence and letters she exchanged with influential figures in various fields such as contemporary American literature, multiculturalism, women's studies, poetry, music composition and education. The third and fourth series include press and reviews related to Weinbaum's personal writings and artwork, as well as items associated with workshops, speaking engagements and other activities given or attended by Weinbaum. The next four series contain substantial materials related to Weinbaum's writing and research, including: drafts of her books, poetry, academic publications, artwork, music and materials related to editing and publishing the journal FemSpec. The Teaching series also encompasses syllabi and course materials used during Weinbaum's time as a graduate student instructor and as a professional at Cleveland State University and Pacifica Graduate Institute.

The collection also includes an extensive Photography series, with photographs/negatives Weinbaum took professionally as a documentary photographer in South America and Mexico; fieldwork in China and Israel, as well as family photo albums and scrapbooks. The eleventh series contains several decades of journals, notebooks and sketchbooks. The Family Memorabilia series documents Weinbaum's relationship with her daughter, Ola Liota Weinbaum. The Audiovisual Materials series has electronic files in a variety of formats including: floppy discs, cassettes, CD-ROMs, DVD-ROMs and VHS tapes. These files encompass Weinbaum's writing and material related to FemSpec. The contents of Weinbuam's hard drive are also described throughout the series where appropriate. Where possible, Weinbuam's original folder titles and descriptions have been retained.

Collection

Margery Sved papers, 1972-1985 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box

Margery (Margie) Sved, PhD is a psychiatrist practicing in the Triangle area of North Carolina. She champions issues related to women and members of the LGBTQ community in medicine.The Margery Sved papers document women's health organizations and events in the Triangle area from the 1970-80's, including a notebook from a conference sponsored by AMWA (American Medical Women's Association) at Duke in 1980 on Leadership for Women in Medicine. There is also a file on an early conference of lesbian physicians.

The Margery Sved papers contains materials documenting women's health organizations and events in the Triangle area of North Carolina from 1972-1985, including educational materials, notes from conferences and workshops related to women and minorities in medicine, and publications on women's health.

Collection
The United Nations' Fourth World Conference on Women was held in Beijing, China, in 1995 and built on political agreements that had been reached at the three previous global conferences on women. Collection includes conference publications, information packets, schedules, and posters collected by attendee Margot Smith, as well as videos produced by Smith. All materials date from 1995 unless otherwise indicated.

Collection includes conference publications, information packets, schedules, and posters collected by attendee Margot Smith. Also included are recordings of conference proceedings and other videos produced by Margot and her company, Off Center Video. Margot's daughter, Janet Linney, was a videographer at the conference and helped produce the recordings. All materials date from 1995 unless otherwise indicated.

Collection
Over 200 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over a third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, her daughters Lucy Saltar and Frances "Fanny" Saltar, and Elizabeth's cousins Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon. Dozens of other letters come from family friends and relatives, male and female, from prominent families in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, New York, and some from the Midwest and New England states. Topics include courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and some discussions of finances. There are a few references to slavery and to enslaved people and servants. Letters sent during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863; one discusses African American troops and their role in the war, and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman. A few earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially in and around Baltimore and Philadelphia. Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The papers consist almost entirely of 266 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over one-third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, the family matriarch, Lucy Saltar, Frances "Fanny" Saltar, Mary Gordon, and Polly Gordon. There are also single letters from other female members of the Saltar family and a handful of letters from men, some of whom were Saltar family members. The letters are organized by correspondent name, ending with a group of letters addressed to unidentified individuals.

The manuscript pages total approximately 765, primarily bifolios, almost all written in ink. There are also four additional manuscripts: an invitation; a sheet of paper with receipts; and a memorandum and bond concerning a land sale. A number of later letters are accompanied by addressed envelopes, some with stamps.

The correspondence is almost entirely comprised of women writing to other women: mothers to daughters; daughters to mothers; and cousins to cousins; and friends to each other. Over half of the collection comprises letters to and from a family matriarch, Elizabeth Gordon Saltar, living at her residence at Magnolia Grove (near Frankford, Pa.), and a large group of letters sent by various correspondents to her daughter Fanny Saltar, who was one of the family's historians. Also present is a large group of correspondence between cousins Elizabeth Gordon Saltar and Mary Gordon, as well as letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's other daughter Lucy Saltar, and letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's cousins, Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon.

Other families who correspond and/or are mentioned often in the letters: Bowne, Brooks, Bunyan, Coleman, Drexel, Hartshorne, Howell, Lardner, McMurtrie, Morgan, Morris, Stillman, Tilghman, Ulstick, Van Dykes, and Wharton. Many of these are prominent families from Pennsylvania or Maryland. One letter from a Bowne in series 7 contains a partial family tree of the Bownes and Saltar families. Most of these letters are found in the Fanny Saltar series.

Among the places from which letters were sent are areas in Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York State, New Jersey, Illinois, Ohio, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Paris (France), and Rome (Italy). Cities represented are Boston, Baltimore, Charleston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, and others. Many letters were sent to or from Magnolia Grove, the Saltar plantation home near Philadelphia.

Topics tend to focus on societal mores and customs of the times as experienced by married and single women of land-owning classes: courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses such as measles, bowel complaints, eye conditions, diphtheria, tumors, and mental illness, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and fairly frequent mentions of finances.

The letters written during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863, as well as a comment on friends going off to war, and one letter discusses African American troops and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman, whom the Saltars knew from Philadelphia. Earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially of events around Baltimore.

Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
North Carolinians Against Racist and Religious Violence (NCARRV) was an activist group based in Durham, NC from 1983-1997 that worked to document hate crimes and hate groups including white supremacists, assist victims, raise awareness, and influence public policy across the state, and these records document their work. Collection includes founding documents, bylaws, meeting files, board meeting documents, photographs, audiovisual materials, administrative materials, grants and grant applications, incident reports, publications, subject and extensive newspaper clippings on racist violence and white supremacy movements in North Carolina.

The North Carolinians Agaist Racist and Religious Violence records document the history of this grassroots activist organization. Collection materials include administrative files, publications, press releases, meeting materials, notes, grants and grant applications, clippings, subject files, photographs and audiovisual materials.

The Administrative Materials series contains files generated by NCARRV's daily work, including letterhead stationery and forms, personnel files, an audit report, licensing documentation, event photographs, incident reports documenting individual hate crimes, NCARRV business meetings, and project files including Hold On! a video produced by NCARRV about hate crimes in Robeson County, NC. There is also documentation of their youth projects and workshops, as well as a grant-funded educational project at NC Central University. That project examined police community relations, an advisory board of police chiefs across the state that looked at how to improve police relationships with communities of color, and published a report called No Reverence For Life.

The Publications and Public Messaging series contains NCARRV's publications and public relations materials, including Annual Reports, Special Reports, Newsletters, Updates, press releases, and other public messaging files.

The Development series contains materials relating to NCARRV's fund-raising activities. It includes files with information about individual membership donations and grant funding. There is a card file with member information as well as routine correspondence. The bulk of this series consists of information from funding organizations and NCARRV's grant application materials.

The Research Files series consists chiefly of NC newspapers clippings on the topic of racist violence from NCARRV's subscription to the Carolina Clippings Service. Also included are photographs documenting hate group marches, subject files, and research and class notes. There are publications from nonprofit groups whose mission relates to NCARRV's. These materials consist of pamphlets, essays, reports, newsletters, periodical issues, and annual reports.

The Audio/Visual series consists of 18 audiocassettes and 42 videocassettes. The audiocassetes contain recordings of phone messages left by Klan members, KKK rallies, and a recording of Mab Segrest speaking at a "Hands off My Neighbor" symposium. The videotapes chiefly consist of copies of and research for "Hold On!: Robeson County's Fight for Justice" produced by NCARRV in 1988. Other video contents include trial coverage, a 1990 Gay Pride March in Raleigh, and recordings of television news shows about racism.

Collection
Lydia Bailey was a prominent 19th century Philadelphia printer. The Lydia Bailey account statement itemizes a printing job commissioned by John Steele of the Port of Philadelphia. The job consisted of labels for imported liquor, wine and tea for use on the cargo of commercial ships.

Manuscript document signed by Lydia Bailey, listing 65 itemized expenditures dated March 8-29, 1823, totaling $141.50 for "Printing certificates of spirits, wines & teas imported in the first quarter of 1823." It begins "Genl. John Steele, Collector of the Port of Philadelphia/To Lydia R. Bailey," and concludes with a certifying statement, and a receipt for payment in full signed by Bailey. Each entry specifies the quantity of certificates printed and the name of the ship for which each lot is destined. There is also a single entry for "1000 copies blanks for inspectors."

Collection
June Miller Kimmel (1931-2021) was a white, North Carolina-based women's rights activist. This collection documents June Miller Kimmel's activist and advocacy work in North Carolina, particularly during the 1990s and 2000s. Material is focused largely upon Kimmel's work with the Women's Legislative Agenda and its annual assemblies, as well as subject files about different aspects of women's history. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

This collection documents June Miller Kimmel's activist and advocacy work in North Carolina, particularly during the 1990s and 2000s. Material is focused largely upon Kimmel's work with the Women's Legislative Agenda and its annual assemblies, as well as subject files about different aspects of women's history. The Women's Agenda files include meeting notes, programs, correspondence, and other relevant information. The women's history files include articles and information about each topic.

Collection
Media critic, feminist author and documentary filmmaker based in Massachusetts. Collection spans 1918-2014 and includes: clippings; tear sheets; correspondence; research reports and other printed materials; slides and slide presentation texts; audiovisual materials in multiple formats including 8mm and 16mm films, audio and video cassettes; book drafts and research files used for teaching and production of Kilbournes books and films. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History & Culture.

Collection spans 1918-2014 and includes: clippings; tear sheets; correspondence; research reports and other printed materials; slides and slide presentation texts; audiovisual materials in multiple formats including 8mm and 16mm films, audio and video cassettes; book drafts and research files used for teaching and production of Kilbournes books and films. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History & Culture.

Collection

Lisa Jaronski zine collection, 1992-2005 5.4 Linear Feet — 9 boxes

A collection of about 470 zines, mostly of the personal nature, mostly written by women, acquired during the period of the late 1990s to early 2000s.

Collection consists of zines primarily from the U.S., with a small number from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Many of the zines were acquired through trade and larger organized swaps referred to as “Lazy Jane’s Zine Trades” arranged by the collector (ie: send in 30 copies of your zine, get 30 unique zines back from the other participants).

Collection

Claudia Horwitz papers, 1988-2013 8.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Collection contains personal and professional papers of Claudia Horwitz, a Chapel Hill spiritual activist, author, and founder of Stone Circles.

Collection includes, but is not limited to writings, research and subject files, project files, talks/speeches, and files documenting group work.

Collection
Leah Fritz is an American feminist poet and author. Although she was born in the United States, Fritz has been active in England since she moved there in 1985. The Leah Fritz papers contain correspondence and subject files; writings, including notebooks and diaries, drafts, published articles, and papers related to the publication of Fritz's prose writings, poetry, and book and article reviews; and audiocassettes of presentations and poetry readings by Fritz and other recordings. Materials range in date from circa 1950 to 2009.

The Leah Fritz papers are organized into three series. The Personal Papers series contains Leah Fritz's correspondence and subject files. The Writings Series contains Fritz's notebooks and diaries as well as drafts, published articles, and papers related to the publication of Fritz's prose writings, poetry, and book and article reviews. The Audiotapes series contains audiocassettes of presentations and poetry readings by Fritz and other recordings.

Collection
Judith A. Fortney is a public health scholar and researcher who received her PhD at Duke University and worked for Family Health International and the World Health Organization. This collection documents her professional activities.

The Judith A. Fortney papers document the professional activities of this pioneering women's health researcher. The materials in this collection include her writings and publications, project documentation, professional correspondence, subject files, photographs, and realia.

Collection

Henry David papers, 1943-2022, bulk 1970s-1990s 140 Linear Feet — 166 boxes

Henry Philip David (1923-2009) was a pioneering researcher in the field of reproductive behavior and public policy and is known for his longitudinal studies on the psychological aspects of abortion, as well as his extensive international collaboration and research. He founded the Transnational Family Research Institute in Bethesda, M.D., in 1972. Collection includes materials documenting David's professional life and research, as well as his work with the Transnational Family Research Institute and coordinating the Psychosocial Workshops.

The Henry David papers span the years 1943-2022 and contain materials documenting his professional life, including monographs, photocopied and reprinted journal articles, grey literature, correspondence, subject files, reports, grant proposals, travel brochures, journals, correspondence, conference papers, media clippings, legal reviews of international abortion rights, assessment measures, and questionnaires. It provides extensive documentation of his international family planning research, his international collaborations, his research on adolescents, the legal standing of abortion, abortion as it relates to mental health, and documentations of his work with the Transnational Family Research Institute.

Collection

Renee Chelian Papers, 1981-1995 6 Linear Feet — 5 boxes

Renee Chelian founded the Northland Family Planning Center, a women's healthcare and abortion clinic in the Detroit area. The Renee Chelian papers include professional papers related to the Northland Family Planning Center, including materials related to anti-abortion groups picketing the clinic, as well as materials related to Chelian's involvement with national women's healthcare organizations.

The Renee Chelian papers include professional papers related to Chelian's clinic, Northland Family Planning in Detroit, Michigan, and her work with national organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Organization for Women. Materials relate mostly to her work at the Northland Family Planning clinic during the 1990s and include newspaper clippings, photographs, pro-choice and anti-abortion materials, completed surveys from patients, family, and friends who visited the clincs, and administrative documents related to escort training, office supplies, and staff information.

The collection also contains materials, such as hate mail and pamphlets, related to anti-abortion groups and their picketing of the Northland Family clinic. Folders titled Saturday contain photographs of the picketors and picketing information of the anti-abortion protesting at the clinic. Materials also relate to other anti-abortion materials, including papers related to the harassment of other abortion providers and the murder of Dr. David Gunn, and anti-clinic organizations such as Operation Rescue, Life Dynamics, Prolife Action League, Feminists for Life, crisis pregnancy centers and leaders such as Randall Terry and Joe Scheidler.

Also included are materials from other women's health organizations and campaigns, including Stand Up For Women, Project Choice, and Operation Rescue. Some of the anti-abortion materials contain explicit images.

Collection
Bill Brown is a filmmaker, photographer, and zinester from Lubbock, Texas. His films explore the landscapes of North America, including the United States–Mexico border, North Dakota missile silos, and the Trans-Canada Highway, and have been exhibited at film festivals and museums around the world. He received a BFA from Harvard in 1992 and a MFA from CalArts in 1997. Brown is the author of a zine called Dream Whip as well as a novel on the underground in L.A., Saugus to the Sea. In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

Collection

Elizabeth Grosz papers, 1973-2016 13.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes

Professional papers of Elizabeth Grosz, professor in the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies Department at Duke University. Materials include her scholarly work, teaching files, and her students' work.

Professional papers of feminist philosopher, Elizabeth (Liz) Grosz: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Grosz. Materials encompass her scholarly work, including research files, manuscripts and typescripts of writings, publications, as well as student work, teaching files including syllabi, lecture notes, etc., and ephemera.

Collection

Tijuana Bibles collection, 1930s-1998 3 Linear Feet — 500 items

Tijuana Bibles, also known as eight-pagers or dirty little books, were small eight-page publications of cartoon erotica and pornography that became popular during the 1930s and 1940s. This collection includes about 400 Tijuana Bibles, some of them duplicates; a few folders of erotica drawings and drafts by an unknown artist; and printed material about Tijuana Bibles, published from the 1970s through the 1990s.

The Tijuana Bibles Collection consists of about 400 Tijuana bibles, some printed material about the bibles and the phenomenon as a whole, and an anonymous author's sketches and drawings of characters and plots.

The Tijuana bibles include a wide range of characters, many inspired by (or lifted from) mainstream media and celebrities. The most frequently used characters were from newspaper comic strips, including Andy Gump, Betty Boop, Blondie and Dagwood, Dick Tracy, Ella Cinders, Dumb Dora, Wimpy, Pete the Tramp, Tillie the Toiler, and Popeye. Other bibles include generic figures such as travelling salesmen (including a vacuum cleaner man, a book salesman, a radio salesmen, and so on); parodies of real people, including Nazis, boxer Joe Louis, and other celebrities; or versions of popular movie heroines, such as Snow White or Mae West.

The collection held in Rubenstein Library consists largely of Tijuana bibles, but also include other small pornographic cartoon or comic joke books, similar in design and in manufacturing quality, but not entirely true to the "traditional" form of a Tijuana bible. There are also Tijuana bible reproductions in this series.

The manuscript materials accompanying the bibles consist of drafts and sketches for two strips, one featuring Wahoo and the other featuring Li'l Abner and Daisy Mae. Also included is a draft of "Fritzi Ritz in 'Kisses for Sale'." This series also includes pornographic drawings of generic female characters, some with and some without text. These do not appear to be taken from any particular Tijuana bible. All of the manuscript material is anonymous and undated.

Finally, the collection also includes a series of books about Tijuana bibles, compiled by the collector, including reprints of some of the bibles as well as essays or historical introductions to the genre. These books were published between 1971 and 1998.

Collection
Since the 1960s, and particularly after the Stonewall uprising of 1969, the modern women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) have produced their own magazines, journals, newspapers, and newsletters as a strategy for unifying and galvanizing their constituencies. These periodicals served to inform movement activists about pertinent actions, news stories, and cultural trends unreported by the mainstream media. The Women's and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Periodicals Collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. A wide variety of periodical genres are represented here, including literary and art journals, newspapers, organizational newsletters, and popular culture magazines. The periodicals in this collection were donated by individuals, purchased, or separated from manuscript collections. Manuscript collections held by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library from which periodicals were separated are the Catherine Nicholson Papers; the Dan Kirsch Papers; the Kate Millett Papers; the Irene Peslikis Papers; the Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers; the Margaret McFadden Papers; and the Charis Books and More-Charis Circle Records. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The original collection numbered forty-one boxes. Additions in 2009, 2011 and 2012 expanded the collection.

Collection
The LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer) Ephemera Collection consists of pamphlets, flyers, t-shirts, and other items that document the activism, celebration, education, harassment, survival, and daily life of the LGBTQ community.

The LGBTQ Ephemera Collection includes posters, pamphlets, newsletters, t-shirts, and other miscellany from a range of organizations and events. Most items are foldered individually.

Collection
This collection consists of zines, primarily authored by women, acquired as donations from multiple collectors or purchased from book stores, zine fairs, and zine distributors. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.
Collection
The collection consists of five typescript letters, one photocopied Encyclopedia Britannica article regarding Sackville-West's book "Aphara Behn" in the "Representative Women" series, along with a poem. The first letter, one page addressed to Sackville-West, dated 1953 May 22, signed "A. Purvis," discusses the birthplace and date of Aphra Behn. A photocopy of the Encyclopedia Britannica article on Behn is included. A typescript note dated 18 July, 1961, signed V. Sackville-West on Sissinghurst letterhead, was written in response to a letter from Sylvia Haymon about Aphra Behn, and Sackville-West's article on Behn in the Encyclopedia Britannica. Included are copies of three letters, all dated 1961, sent to Sylvia Haymon, two to Sackville-West, and one to Miss J. Parfitt, Acting Editor of the Women's Page of The Times in London. The topics of the undated, one-page "Diary-Poem" have to do with Sackville-West's loss of her given name upon her marriage to Harold Nicolson in 1913, and the loss of Knole, her family's estate in Kent, in 1928 because of patriarchal inheritance laws.

The collection consists of five typescript letters, one photocopied Encyclopedia Britannica article regarding Sackville-West's book "Afara Behn" in the "Representative Women" series, along with a poem. The first letter, one page addressed to Sackville-West, dated 1953 May 22, signed "A. Purvis," discusses the birthplace and date of Aphra Behn. A photocopy of the Encyclopedia Britannica article on Behn is included. A typescript note dated 18 July, 1961, signed V. Sackville-West on Sissinghurst letterhead, was written in response to a letter from Sylvia Haymon about Aphra Behn, and Sackville-West's article on Behn in the Encyclopedia Britannica. Included are copies of three letters, all dated 1961, sent to Sylvia Haymon, two to Sackville-West, and one to Miss J. Parfitt, Acting Editor of the Women's Page of The Times in London. The topics of the undated, one-page "Diary-Poem" have to do with Sackville-West's loss of her given name upon her marriage to Harold Nicolson in 1913, and the loss of Knole, her family's estate in Kent, in 1928 because of patriarchal inheritance laws.

Collection
The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Ailecia Ruscin is a writer, activist, and scholar from San Antonio, Texas and Auburn, Alabama. She is the author or co-author of the zines provo-CAT-ive and alabama grrrl (published from 1997-2000).

The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Christina Rossetti letter, 1881 December 17 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection consists of a single letter from the Pre-Raphealite poet Christina Rossetti to an unnamed recipient in the publishing industry. She grants him permission to use poems from three of her published collections in an upcoming "Fine Art Book for Christmas 1882." Rossetti states that there should be no variation of the text from the source material, and that she chose those three collections because she personally holds their copyright.

Collection consists of an autograph manuscript letter signed Christina G. Rossetti, granting the unnamed recipient, presumably a publisher, permission to reprint some of her poems. The letter is written on a single folded sheet of paper with text on two pages. She lists her address as: 30 Torrington Square - London - W.C. Rossetti refers to the correspondent's "assurance that no variation whatsoever" will appear in "your Fine Art book for Xmas 1882." Rossetti names three of her books he may use as source material: "Poems," "Pageant," and "Sing Song." She writes, "I name these, because not every piece to be found elsewhere is in every instance of my own copyright."

Collection
Collection comprises a printed copy of a will (1875?), along with manuscript inventories; lists of stocks and bonds; related correspondence; and payments made against the estate of Margaret Bromfield Blanchard in 1877 and 1878. Henry B. Rogers served as her executor. There are also her manuscript records outlining the distribution of the estate, dated 1867-1868. The Bromfield School is mentioned extensively in the will and the distribution documents. In the will she outlines "if boys are admitted [to the school], I order that their number shall always be one-third less than that of girls." In addition, there are a few records related to the estate of Margaret Blanchard's grandfather?, Henry Bromfield, in Cheltenham, England, dated 1836-1842, including the executor's account. Unrelated documents include a written agreement between Mary Blanchard and Hiram Osborn for his assumption of the farming duties in 1864, along with a letter regarding the establishment of trustees for the Bromfield school, dated around 1890.
Collection
Laura "Tibbie" Roberts is a life-long activist for women's rights and has been repeatedly honored for her community service and volunteering in North Carolina and abroad. The collection consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0084) (3.6 lin. ft.; 2700 items; dated 1970s-2000s) consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Items of note include her materials from the North Carolina Council of Churches, the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing (1995), North Carolina Council for Women, the National Women's Conference in Houston (1978), and the United Methodist Church's United Methodist Women Southeast Jurisdiction. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0150) (0.6 lin. ft.; 200 items; dated 1970s-1995) consists largely of scrapbooks from Roberts' conferences in the 1990s, including her trips to China, Singapore, and Malaysia as part of the Fourth Annual World Conference on Women, the NGO Forum on Women, and the World Methodist Conference, and her trip to Israel as part of an excavation course. Also included are materials from a filmstrip promoting the Equal Rights Amendment.

Accession (2010-0131) (0.1 lin. ft.; 25 items; dated 1979-1997 and undated) comprises material primarily related to support for the Equal Rigths Amendment. Includes printed material, newspaper clippings, 15 color photographs, and an ERA necklace medalion.

Accession (2011-0108 and 2011-0123)(0.2 lin. ft.; 8 items; dated 1811-2011 and undated) includes a family deed regarding land in Craven County; a letter; printed items on women and religion, one of which is annotated by the donor; and a piece of ephemera with a quote from the ERA on the front and a Bible verse on the back.

Collection

Marilla M. Ricker scrapbook, 1866-1911 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 item

Marilla Ricker was an influential suffragist and pioneering woman lawyer. Her scrapbook consists chiefly of newspaper clippings by and about Ricker, chronicling her long activist career and public life advocating for suffrage and equal rights for women. It also includes correspondence and ephemera.

Collection comprises a scrapbook (66 leaves, 27 x 35 cm.) bound in maroon cloth with oak leaf and acorn decoration on front cover. The first leaf is inscribed "Marilla M. Ricker, March 1, 1896, 30 Codman Place, Roxbury, Mass." It consists chiefly of U.S newspaper clippings by and about Ricker. Some clippings have mss. annotations indicating the titles and dates of the newspapers. Topics include Ricker's political writings, philanthropic activities, and extensive activism on behalf of women's suffrage. Suffrage activities detailed in the newspaper stories include Ricker's legal activities, attempts to vote, run for public office, and apply for a diplomatic post. Also pasted in are six notes addressed to Ricker from correspondents including the Arts and Crafts Movement leader Elbert Hubbard, Illinois Senator John A. Logan, and the African-American author, orator, and abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Clipped autographs from faith leader Sarah J. Farmer, suffrage leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Ohio Senator John Sherman are also pasted in. Black and white portraits and illustrations of Ricker are interspersed throughout. The scrapbook also contains an 1881 certification admitting Ricker to the bar of the District of Columbia, an 1899 brief from a case Ricker tried before the Supreme Court of New Hampshire, printed ephemera including the seal of the American Secular Union and Freethought Federation, and 25 U.S. postage stamps.