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Collection
Collection comprises a poster that promotes the organization's "aims to make knowledge about women's bodies and health available to women," and to "develop policy about women's health with women." Important issues illustrated include affordable health care, stopping the spread of AIDS, and a woman's right to choose contraception. There is also contact information.
Collection
Group of Ten Lakas ng Kababaihan, Inc. was established in 1962 as an informal group of countries that contribute to General Arrangements to Borrow (GAB). Collection comprises a poster protesting against IMF that Aggr[e]vates Inequality and Disempowerment of "poor southern women." Published in Quezon City, Philippines.

Collection comprises a poster protesting against IMF that Aggr[e]vates Inequality and Disempowerment of "poor southern women." Published in Quezon City, Philippines. Images reflect the areas women wish funding to be directed instead, including ecofeminism, reproductive health, leadership organizing, education, economic development, and promoting programs that end violence against women.

Collection
Collection comprises an autograph letter from Marianne North to Dr. Jessop, dated May 22, requesting that Jessop provide details about the possible sale of manuscripts of her ancestor, Roger North.

Collection comprises an autograph letter from Marianne North to Dr. Jessop, dated May 22, requesting that Jessop provide details about the possible sale of manuscripts of her ancestor, Roger North.

Collection

Lydia Howard Sigourney letter, undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a handwritten letter Lydia Howard Sigourney drafted as Secretary for the Hartford Ladies' Association for supplicating justice and mercy towards [sic?] the Indians, to request assistance with the circulation of a petition among the women of Hartford. The letter also discusses the political process behind the petition and its circulation. Includes a faint handwritten addendum, written in another person's hand, noting a decision not to send the letter. The item is undated, but possibly dates to the 1830s.
Collection

Henry Noel Brailsford letters, probably 1911. 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Henry Noel Brailsford was the most prolific British left-wing journalist of the first half of the 20th century. A founding member of the Men's League for Women's Suffrage in 1907, he resigned from his job at The Daily News in 1909 when it supported the force-feeding of suffragettes on hunger strike. Collection comprises two letters from Henry Noel Brailsford to (John Howard?) Whitehouse, probably written in 1911.

Collection comprises two letters from Henry Noel Brailsford to (John Howard?) Whitehouse, probably written in 1911. In the first letter, dated 31 January, Brailsford urges Whitehouse to get his Committee to cooperate with the Conciliation Committee in getting a Conciliation Bill passed ("... the P.M. is more likely to listen to your Committee"). Brailsford also tries to enlist Whitehouse to help him find new members for the Conciliation Committee: "If you see any Liberals who are good suffragists & are not averse in principle from working with Tories, I hope you will invite them to join us." In the second letter, dated 3 March, Brailsford discusses Whitehouse's decision to resign and urges him to reconsider. The resignation was (presumably) over the Conciliation Committee's handling of an inquiry into the violent clash between suffragettes from the Women's Social and Political Union and the police on 1910 November 18 at the House of Commons. On stationery of the Conciliation Committee for Woman Suffrage. Includes transcripts for both letters.

Collection
Lucinda Marshall is a poet and a feminist activist. The collection consists of the saved copies of blogposts for various feminist websites run or written by Marshall, some of Marshall's other writings, interviews, as well as miscellaneous administrative and editorial materials for her offline projects and activities. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of the saved copies of blogposts for various feminist websites run or written by Marshall, some of Marshall's other writings, interviews, as well as miscellaneous administrative and editorial materials for her offline projects and activities. The following blogs from 2000s and 2010s are represented: Feminist Peace Network, Occupy Patriarchy, Reclaiming Medusa, RH Reality Check, and Women's Media Center. There are editorial materials for the special issue "Women Envision Peace" for Off Our Backs journal. In addition, the collection contains Marshalls's working materials for her talk "The Other Terrorism - Militarism and Violence Against Women" presented at the University of Dayton in April 2010. Also included are administrative materials for celebrations of International Women's Day in Louisville, KY in 2004-2007.

Collection
The National Organization for Women (NOW) is a feminist activist organization founded in 1966. Collection comprises one product order form on newsprint, offering feminist and activist-themed items (books, buttons, t-shirts, jewelry, stickers, etc.) available for sale from the National Organization for Women office in Washington, D.C.

Collection comprises one product order form on newsprint, offering feminist and activist-themed items (books, buttons, t-shirts, jewelry, stickers, etc.) available for sale from the National Organization for Women office in Washington, D.C.

Collection
Online
Leah Fritz (1932-2020) was an American feminist poet and author born in New York. She wrote the books Thinking Like a Woman (1975) and Dreamers and Dealers (1980), focusing on the women's movement. The Leah Fritz papers contain correspondence and subject files; writings, including notebooks and diaries, drafts, published articles, and papers related to the publication of Fritz's prose writings, poetry, and book and article reviews; and audiocassettes of presentations and poetry readings by Fritz and other recordings. Materials range in date from circa 1950 to 2009. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Leah Fritz papers are organized into three series. The Personal Papers series contains Leah Fritz's correspondence and subject files. The Writings Series contains Fritz's notebooks and diaries as well as drafts, published articles, and papers related to the publication of Fritz's prose writings, poetry, and book and article reviews. The Audiotapes series contains audiocassettes of presentations and poetry readings by Fritz and other recordings.

Collection

Edith Sitwell poems, circa 1940-1950 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Dame Edith Sitwell was a British poet and critic whose work helped usher in the modernist era of British poetry. This autograph manuscript contains the text of two of her poems: "Lullaby" and "Serenade: From Any Man to Any Woman." Both poems were inspired by the early years of World War II and were published in her 1942 collection "Street Songs."

The five leaf holograph manuscript with text on the front side of each numbered page consists of two poems both titled at the top and signed "Edith" at the bottom. Both poems, "Lullaby," and "Serenade: Any Man to Any Woman" appeared in her 1942 collection "Street Songs." In this manuscript, "Serenade" is titled "Any Man to Any Woman." Both were inspired by the early years of World War II and are ironically titled. "Lullaby," sung by a baboon, describes a chaotic, primeval world destroyed by wartime chaos and despair in which, "All is equal - blindness, sight/There is no depth, there is no height." "Serenade" spoken by a dying soldier, regards his love through the lens of death and destruction. He identifies his love with a cannon and invites her to "die with me and be my love" in a reversal of the famous Marlowe line.

Both poems are referenced in the Edith Sitwell papers at the Ransom Humanities Center. Viewed March 9, 2017

Source: Misko, Ellen, "A Study of Dame Edith Sitwell's Later Poems: 1940-1945" (1972). Dissertations. Paper 1211. Viewed March 9, 2017

Collection
Norma Taylor Mitchell was an American History professor at Troy University in Alabama and a lay leader in the United Methodist Church. These materials document her research and teaching career, as well as her church leadership.

The collection contains material documenting Mitchell's dissertation research on the Virginia politician David Campbell (1779-1859). Boxes 2-5 consist entirely of information on loose index cards. These materials also document Mitchell's research on the enslaved women who lived on Campbell's estate in Abington, VA. The collection also contains materials related to Mitchell's research on the Alabama physician Louise Branscomb. There are materials documenting Mitchell's professional activities and teaching career at what was then known as Troy State University. Mitchell's extensive service work in the Methodist Church at the local, regional, and national levels is also documented.

Collection

Photographs of women's college production of a Sanskrit drama, circa 1905 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 62 images on 14 card mounts

Set of 62 captioned black-and-white photographic prints mounted on 14 cardstock boards, documenting an elaborate stage production of a well-known, classical Sanskrit drama, the S´akuntala¯. The play was probably produced at the Northfield Seminary for Young Ladies in Northfield, Massachusetts around 1905, at a time when Indian dramas were popularized and produced by many women's colleges. The photographs are mounted on the front and back of cardstock mounts, and portray individual young female actors playing male and female roles, as well as tableaus with groups of actors. The images vividly capture the actors' expressions and gestures and portray detailed Oriental costumes and props. Most of the handwritten ink captions name the characters depicted, and many also list quotes from the particular act or scene. One image features a scenic view of Northfield Seminary from across the Connecticut River. The images range in size from range in size from 5.5 x 3.75 to 8 x 13.75 inches, with the mounts measuring 9x14 inches. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Set of 62 mounted and captioned black-and-white photographic prints documenting an elaborate stage production of a well-known, classical Sanskrit drama, the S´akuntala¯; the play was probably produced at the Northfield Seminary for Young Ladies in Northfield, Massachusetts around 1905. The photographs are mounted on the front and back of 14 heavy card stock boards. The images range in size from range in size from 5.5 x 3.75" to 8 x 13.75", with the mounts measuring 9x14" with one exception measuring 10x16. There are a few near-duplicates among the images.

The images feature portraits of costumed female actors playing male and female roles, as well as groups of actors and several long shots of the stage, in which the curtains, scenery, and part of an orchestra pit can also be seen. The images vividly capture the actors' expressions and gestures, and portray detailed Oriental costumes and props (these argue against it being Smith College's 1904 production, as it was reported as using Americanized costumes and music). Most of the handwritten ink captions name the characters depicted, and many also list quotes from the particular act or scene. One image features a scenic view of Northfield Seminary from across the Connecticut River, with small white tents visible on the lawns to the left; the play may have been produced at Northfield during a summer conference. One of the school's alumna, Ruth St. Denis, was an important modern dancer who popularized Oriental dances and dramas; she appeared in Sakuntala in 1905, perhaps giving the impetus to a staging of the play at Northfield Seminary.

The card stock mounts, with their associated images, are arranged in their original order based on the negative numbers visible in each still image: 1-31, 33-38, and 40-62, with numbers 32, 39, and 59 absent. The view of the campus is unnumbered.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection
Delouis Wilson is an African American artist, and jewelry designer, and art collector, based in Durham, North Carolina. The papers comprise her journals (1977-2008); calendars; sketchbooks, art school notebooks, and loose pieces of mixed media artwork. The journals, currently closed to use, document in detail her personal life, travels in the U.S. and abroad, including time spent in Tunisia in the Peace Corps, life in Durham, N.C., and employment as a jewelry designer. The collection also includes 30 large photographic studio portraits of African Americans, almost all hand-tinted crayon enlargements, dating from about 1890 to 1945 and collected by Wilson chiefly in the Southern U.S. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts, the Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The papers of Delouis Wilson, an artist and jewelry designer based in North Carolina, consist of a set of 27 journals (1977-2008, currently closed); a few calendar notebooks; sketchbooks and notebooks from her time at Atlanta College of Art; and loose pieces of artwork. An important component of Wilson's archive consists of a collection of 30 large photographic portraits of African Americans dating from the late 1880s to about 1940, collected by Wilson chiefly in the American South.

Wilson's journals (closed to use by donor request), calendars, and notebooks document in detail the personal life of the artist, life in Durham, N.C., her travels abroad and in the U.S., including time in Tunisia in the Peace Corps, and her career as a jewelry designer. They include small illustrations contain as well as laid-in items such as letters and postcards; some have handmade covers constructed of textiles and other non-paper materials.

The artwork, sketchbooks, and art notebooks present a mix of drawings, sketches, prints, textile work, and mixed-media color paintings created by Wilson during and shortly after her art school years, all 8x11 inches or less. The notebooks also include art school class notes and handouts, creative writings, and personal notes such as recipes, lists, housing notes, and addresses. There are self-portraits scattered throughout, including a larger piece from 1990 laid into a sketchbook. Also in the collection is one large color photograph of an African American woman by Wilson. The artworks range in size from 4 1/2 x 6 to 16x20 inches.

A central component of the collection are thirty historic studio portraits of individual Black men and women (1890s-1940s), with some of couples and families, collected by Wilson in thrift shops and flea markets throughout the Southern U.S. Most belong to a process called crayon enlargements. The studios developed faint enlargements of the photographic images on convex pieces of thick card stock, then outlined and filled them with ink, crayon, or pastel pigments to resemble a painting. Only one portrait in the collection is a true fully developed gelatin silver photograph. A few smaller portraits are sized approximately 10x8 to 13x9 inches; the majority are quite large, ranging from 19x13 to to 20x16 inches. Most of the prints are hand-tinted with a variety of tecniques, but some are black-and-white, and some are on flat rather than convex mounts. Due to their fragile condition, the portraits are currently unavailable until Conservation treatment and rehousing is completed.

Collection

Mathilde Blind letter, circa 1889-1896 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Mathilde Blind was a writer and feminist active in late 19th century England. This letter was written by Blind thanking a correspondent for sending her a newspaper clipping containing a review of her work. She expresses gratitude for his thoughtfulness and for his "sympathetic spirit" towards her work.

The collection comprises a single autograph manuscript letter on a single folded sheet of paper with text on three sides dated June 19, but lacking a year. The manuscript address given at the top of the first page reads: Holly Cottage, The Mount, Hampstead, London, N.W. In the letter, Mathilde Blind writes to thank an unknown male correspondent for sending her a clipping from the Liverpool Mercury containing a review of one of her works. Blind writes, "Sitting here this evening, somewhat tired, somewhat despondent, there comes to me your letter. I cannot tell you how it cheered and strengthened me. There is something profoundly stirring in the thought that far away, among the great unknown multitude of one's fellow beings, there are people who have entered into one's work with a kindly sympathetic spirit."

Collection
Resident of South Berwick, Maine. The centerpiece of this collection is a late 19th century scrapbook belonging to Sarah E. Goodwin of Maine, into which manuscript and printed instructions and patterns for the creation of tapestries, collars, edging, capes, mittens, afghans, hoods, curtains, infant shoes, slippers, and other items were pasted and pinned. Collection also includes a commonplace book of knitting and crocheting patterns, home remedies for illnesses and diseases, and a variety of household tips, as well as poems, literary quotations, and miscellaneous lists of information; as well as a catalog for a Baptist church in South Berwick, Maine (1898), numerous patterns for embroidered monograms, and many loose patterns. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The centerpiece of this collection is a late 19th century scrapbook belonging to Sarah E. Goodwin of Berwick, Maine, into which manuscript and printed instructions and patterns for the creation of tapestries, collars, edging, capes, mittens, afghans, hoods, curtains, infant shoes, slippers, and other items were pasted and pinned. Patterns for knitting, crocheting, quilting, embroidery, tatting, and other types of handwork are included. Collection also includes a commonplace book of knitting and crocheting patterns, which also contains home remedies for illnesses and diseases, and a variety of household tips, as well as poems, literary quotations, and miscellaneous lists of information. Other items in the collection include a catalogue for a Baptist church in South Berwick, Maine (1898), numerous patterns for embroidered monograms, and many loose patterns.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Lisa Unger Baskin Collection of Photographs, circa 1860-1960s, bulk 1860-1910 4.5 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — 514 items — Dimensions are given in item-level entries in centimeters and are approximate. The great majority are standard cartes-de-visite and cabinet card sizes, with more modern prints ranging from 4x6 to 8x10 inches; the largest items, few in number, measure approximately 10x12 up to 11x15 inches. — The majority of the items in this visual collection take the form of 19th century albumen cartes-de-visite and cabinet cards mounted on card stock. As the 19th century wanes, gelatin silver prints, most also mounted, become more common. There are a handful of cased images, stereographic cards, a few tintypes, several platinum prints, and photo-mechanical images in the form of single prints and postcards. Many of the albumen portraits are hand-tinted and card mounts are often ornately decorated, while others are roughly trimmed and spare in detail. Color pigments are chiefly found in hand-tinted photographs or in mechanical prints.

Lisa Unger Baskin, who assembled this collection of photographs centered on women's history and culture, is a bibliophile, collector, and activist. Collection consists of 514 photographs and other graphic items in a variety of formats typical for the time, chiefly albumen, but also including gelatin silver, cased images, and mechanical prints; there are also small groups of true photographic postcards. Along with titles, dates, and content, data points may include biographies of photographers and subjects, studio addresses, and other notes. Roughly three-quarters of the images were produced by commercial women photographers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. The great majority date from about 1860 to 1920, and the most common format is studio portraits of white men, women, children, and families. There are also many photographs of well-known women artists, entertainers, intellectuals, and activists of the time, as well as images of women in educational and a variety of work settings, on sports teams, posing with uniforms, guns, and tools, and enjoying leisure activities. Roughly 40 images are portraits of African Americans and other people of color or mixed race. Color images are chiefly limited to hand-tinted images and mechanical prints. Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection consists of 514 photographic items, almost all single black-and-white prints, in a variety of formats typical for the 19th and early 20th centuries: largely albumen, with some gelatin silver prints, a few tintypes, daguerreotypes, glass plates, and one cyanotype. There are also some mechanical prints such as Woodburytypes and half-tone prints, and groups of commercially produced postcards, collectible cards, and stereographs. Color images are chiefly limited to hand-tinted images and mechanical prints.

Roughly three-quarters of the images were taken by women photographers operating or managing studios in all regions of the United States, with a smaller number in England, Sweden, Canada, and a few other countries; some were well-known but the majority were small business operators in smaller cities and towns. Whenever possible, a brief photographer's biography is included with the image entry.

The majority of the images are studio portraits of mostly unidentified North American men, women, children, and families, with a slight focus on New England. Roughly 40 images are portraits of African American or mixed-race individuals young and old, with a few groups of people of color. There are several ethnographic images of northern African women and a few scenes from Southeast Asia.

In addition to portraiture, the collection offers images of women artists, authors, nurses, teachers, and students who appear in early images of graduation and sports teams. Women and girls in boarding house and hotel rooms, at home, on bicycles, at work in factories, large and small offices, mines, and hospitals, wearing uniforms, brandishing guns and tools, and enjoying leisure activities. One hand-sewn booklet of photographs appears to show scenes from a training school for African American women. Also present are many portraits of female actors, entertainers, and wealthy women. There are very few musicians. Of interest are several photographs of light-skinned enslaved children distributed as abolitionist propaganda.

The cataloger transcribed titles and dates when present and indicated the source location; in the absence of a title, the cataloger devised descriptive titles. The great majority of dates are approximate and are based on the format, biographies, geneaologies, and clothing styles. Much information was derived from history of photography websites and photographer indexes, especially the website Langdon's List of 19th & Early 20th Century Photographers.

Collection

Maria Mitchell letters, circa 1846-1868 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Maria Mitchell was a pioneering United States astronomer. This collection comprises three social correspondence notes written by Mitchell between approximately 1846-1868.

Collection comprises three manuscript notes by Mitchell. The first, written while Mitchell was the librarian at the Nantucket Atheneum, is addressed to a Mrs. Greene regarding a John Quincy Adams letter Mitchell has forwarded to her "at Phebe's request" for her autograph business. The second, written while Mitchell was teaching at Vassar College, is addressed to a Mrs. Burner asking for letters of recommendation to a number of people in London. The third, dated 1877, to a Miss Ladd, sends her regrets for not being able to speak at the Harvard School commencement.

Collection
Madame de Rhinfeld, née St. Clair, grew up in a convent in France, where she was instructed in the construction of artificial flowers. She later used this skill to make a living in England. Collection comprises an handwritten, unpublished manuscript volume (256 written pages, plus 45 watercolor and 5 pen and ink plates of illustrations) by Madame de Rhinfeld, written around 1830. In the manuscript, Rhinfeld provides detailed instruction on how to create 24 different artificial flowers, and describes the tools used to make them. Flowers include pomegranate, hyacinth, roses, pansies, narcissus, geraniums, and orange flowers, among others. Includes watercolor diagrams regarding the construction of each flower, with additional paintings of the finished piece. The instructions are accompanied by a chapter of poetry, stories, quotations, and commentary related to each flower. Scattered throughout the manuscript are other pen and ink drawings. Includes an index to flowers and to poets.

Collection comprises an handwritten, unpublished manuscript volume (256 written pages, plus 45 watercolor and 5 pen and ink plates of illustrations) by Madame de Rhinfeld, written around 1830. In the manuscript, Rhinfeld provides detailed instruction on how to create 24 different artificial flowers, and describes the tools used to make them. Flowers include pomegranate, hyacinth, roses, pansies, narcissus, geraniums, and orange flowers, among others. Includes watercolor diagrams regarding the construction of each flower, with additional paintings of the finished piece. The instructions are accompanied by a chapter of poetry, stories, quotations, and commentary related to each flower. Scattered throughout the manuscript are other pen and ink drawings. Includes an index to flowers and to poets.

Collection
Single page testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman describing her husband's physical abuse and his neglect of his children.

Single-page handwritten manuscript testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman on the topic of her husband's physical abuse of her and his neglect of their children. Text reads: "Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed." Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Resident of New England. Collection comprises a 1-page bill detailing the costs incurred by Elizabeth Parry during childbirth, including charges for a midwife; food and board; sugar, bread, spices, oatmeal and fruit; a "watch on fixed nights" and candles; the child's linen and clothing; two cords of firewood; a fire wood cutter; and two trips to Boston during the lying-in. Also includes the cost of "time spent to go to authority to make complaint of Edward Dix the father of my above[said] child." The bill is signed by Parry, and witnessed by John Phillips, Joseph Lynde, Jonas Bond, and Edward Emerson.

Collection comprises a 1-page bill detailing the costs incurred by Elizabeth Parry during childbirth, including charges for a midwife; food and board; sugar, bread, spices, oatmeal and fruit; a "watch on fixed nights" and candles; the child's linen and clothing; two cords of firewood; a fire wood cutter; and two trips to Boston during the lying-in. Also includes the cost of "time spent to go to authority to make complaint of Edward Dix the father of my above[said] child." The bill is signed by Parry, and witnessed by John Phillips, Joseph Lynde, Jonas Bond, and Edward Emerson.

Collection
Lady Elizabeth Holford was born Elizabeth Lewis around 1650. She first married a merchant called Harbin, whose wealth she inherited. Her second husband was a poor baronet, Sir William Holford, who died before her. Lady Holford died on 3 November 1720, without an heir. Collection comprises a handwritten manuscript copy (70 pages; incomplete, the text ends mid-sentence) of Lady Holford's will and codicils, created around 1720, following her death. In the will, large sums of money are bequeathed to several Oxford colleges, including Christ Church, Pembroke and Worcester Colleges, and Hart Hall, along with Charterhouse School. There are also lesser legacies made to various London charity schools, along with other amounts left to individuals.

Collection comprises a handwritten manuscript copy (70 pages; incomplete, the text ends mid-sentence) of Lady Holford's will and codicils, created around 1720, following her death. In the will, large sums of money are bequeathed to several Oxford colleges, including Christ Church, Pembroke and Worcester Colleges, and Hart Hall, along with Charterhouse School. There are also lesser legacies made to various London charity schools, along with other amounts left to individuals.

Collection

Julia Penelope papers, ca. 1986-1999 3 Linear Feet — 1800 Items

This accession continues to document Julia Penelope's life as a lesbian and feminist activist and academic. Materials include correspondence and financial records; lecture notes and writings by Penelope dealing with subjects that include linguistics, lesbian communities, lesbian separatists, and coming out; subject files; and book reviews of works by Penelope and others. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture. For information on earlier accessions, please consult the Duke Library online catalog.

Collection

Dwayne Dixon Zine collection, ca. 1984-ca. 1995 2.5 Linear Feet — 224 Items

Dwayne Dixon was an employee in the Literacy Through Photography program at the Center for Documentary Studies. Collection includes 110 zines (150 items, ca. 1984-ca. 1995) produced across the United States and Central America and collected by Dixon throughout the 1990s. The majority of the zines demonstrate young men's search for life meaning, morality, and identity, especially through hardcore and punk music/lifestyle, including interviews with bands, album reviews, and criticism of the status quo. Other groups of zines were produced by children participating in various afterschool and enrichment programs in Durham, NC; by Central American women in Mexico, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and El Salvador; and by American young women raging against rape and sexism and searching for a less traditional sexual identity. Many zines include erotica, drawings, copies of photographs, and cartoons.

110 zines (150 items, ca. 1984-ca. 1995) produced across the United States and Central America and collected by Dixon throughout the 1990s. The majority of the zines demonstrate young men's search for life meaning, morality, and identity, especially through hardcore and punk music/lifestyle, including interviews with bands, album reviews, and criticism of the status quo. Other groups of zines were produced by children participating in various afterschool and enrichment programs in Durham, NC; by Central American women in Mexico, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and El Salvador; and by American young women raging against rape and sexism and searching for a less traditional sexual identity. Many zines include erotica, drawings, copies of photographs, and cartoons. Online searchable database includes more detailed descriptions of the first accession of this collection. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Studio Girl Cosmetics Records include promotional materials related to the multi-level marketing and direct sales cosmetics company. Collection includes leaflets and a pamphlet with beauty tips as well as sales team recruitment materials. Also contains an LP record with the voice of company Chairman Harry Taylor.

The Studio Girl Cosmetics Records include promotional materials related to the Glendale, California-based multi-level marketing and direct sales cosmetics company. This one-folder collection includes two promotional leaflets with beauty tips for customers: “Your Studio Girl Way to Loveliness,” and “Studio Girl: Hollywood Coiffure Blend Hair Fashions of Permalon.” There is also one pamphlet for potential Studio Girl sales representatives called “From a Man’s Point of View.” Other items are recruitment materials including a sales team member application, identification cards, stamped paper bags for products, and branded mailing envelopes. Also contains a plasticized LP record with the voice of company Chairman Harry Taylor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture.

Collection

European tourist travel negatives, between 1910-1915 36 items — 1 box — 34 nitrate negatives; 2 original processing envelopes — 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches

This early 20th century collection of 34 nitrate sheet negatives features black-and-white travel images taken mainly in European cities. Subjects chiefly focus on popular tourist landmarks such as gardens, parks, bridges, buildings, and statuary. The travelers seem to be all women and at least one young child. Locations identified by library staff include Paris and Bruges, but other locations are unidentified, as are the photographer and subjects. It is assumed that some locations are in London or England, as one of two commercial photograph processing envelopes from the London firm Selfridge's accompanying the negatives is marked "English trip 1913." The negatives are sized 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches.

This early 20th century collection of 34 nitrate sheet negatives features black-and-white tourist travel images mainly taken in European cities sometime between 1910-1915. Subjects chiefly focus on landmarks such as gardens, parks, bridges, buildings, and statuary. The travelers seem to include women and at least one young child. Identified cities include Paris and Bruges, but other locations are uncertain, as are the identities of the photographer and subjects. Two commercial photographic processing envelopes are from the London firm Selfridge's; one is marked "English trip, 1913." The negatives are sized 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches.

The dating is taken in part from the 1913 date on the processing envelope and from a billboard advertising a musical being staged in Paris.

Forms part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection, acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Virginia Woolf's oak writing desk, between 1904-1907 2.5 Linear Feet — 67.4 x 126 x 87.7 cm; 26.5 x 49.5 x 34.5 inches

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath. Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath.Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Collection
Dame Ellen Terry, considered the leading Shakespearean actor of her time, was a member of the company at London's Lyceum Theatre from 1878-1902. Collection comprises an autograph note on Lyceum Theatre letterhead (5"x8"). The actor Ellen Terry writes to "Olga" to schedule a social engagement. She writes, "I'm much grieved to hear of you mother ..." and sends "best remembrances" to Olga's husband. There is also an undated cabinet photograph, by Window & Grove photographers, London.

Collection comprises an autograph note on Lyceum Theatre letterhead (5"x8"). The actor Ellen Terry writes to "Olga" to schedule a social engagement. She writes, "I'm much grieved to hear of you mother ..." and sends "best remembrances" to Olga's husband. There is also an undated cabinet photograph, by Window & Grove photographers, London.

Collection
Ada Lovelace was a mathematician in 19th century England and the only legitimate child of the poet George Gordon, Lord Byron. She is often recognized as the creator of the first set of instructions meant to be carried out by a machine, and is thus seen as a pioneer of what would later become computer programming. The Ada Lovelace letter is a one-page note to [Fortunato] Prandi, an Italian interpreter, regarding ten guineas Lovelace owed Prandi.

Consists of a single hand-written letter to [Fortunato] Prandi, dated Thursday 5th August. Date could be 1841 or 1847. One page, folded, written on front and back.

The letter is apparently in reply to a request for ten guineas owed by Lovelace to Prandi. She discusses putting off sending him the sum because of travel and also "disagreeable business." She goes on to say she is well in spite of being a "disconsolate widow" and will soon "leave town", "probably to Brighton". The letter closes with an apology for the lateness of repayment and includes a postscript noting her amusement at the "modesty" of his request. It is signed A. A. Lovelace.

Collection
Virginia Woolf was an English writer and publisher, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection
Lydia Bailey was a prominent 19th-century Philadelphia printer. The Lydia Bailey account statements itemizes two printing jobs commissioned by John Steele of the Port of Philadelphia. The jobs were for use by commercial ships.

Includes two manuscript documents. The first, signed by Lydia Bailey, listing 65 itemized expenditures dated March 8-29, 1823, totaling $141.50 for "Printing certificates of spirits, wines & teas imported in the first quarter of 1823." It begins "Genl. John Steele, Collector of the Port of Philadelphia/To Lydia R. Bailey," and concludes with a certifying statement and a receipt for payment in full signed by Bailey. Each entry specifies the quantity of certificates printed and the name of the ship for which each lot is destined. There is also a single entry for "1000 copies blanks for inspectors." The second manuscript itemized 268 expenditures dated April 3-June 25, 1823, totaling $664.25, entitled "Genl. John Steele, Collector of the Port of Philadelphia/To Lydia R. Bailey." Again, each entry specifies the quantity of certificates printed and the name of the ship for which each lot is destined. There are water stains on this document.

Collection
Helen Yglesias (1915-2008) was an American novelist. Collection comprises photocopies of research material, along with an edited and final manuscript related to Yglesias' book, ISABEL BISHOP.

Collection comprises photocopies of research material, along with an edited and final manuscript related to Yglesias' book, ISABEL BISHOP, published by Rizzoli, 1989, New York.

Collection
Clémentine Louant (1831-1915) was a Belgian novelist and poet. Collection includes a press pass, two articles on Louant, a few samples of her writing and poetry, and some genealogy for the family.

Collection includes a press pass, two articles on Louant, a few samples of her writing and poetry, and some genealogy for the family. The press pass is for the Grand Concours International in 1888 in Brussels. It contains Louant's image and her signature. The two articles are from undated magazines. The handwritten writings have to do with her family history and "the small happiness;" the poems are about the rain and the ruins of an abbey. There are three articles containing information about the Louant family and genealogy.

Collection
Eleanor Vere Boyle (1825-1916) was an British artist of the Victorian era whose work consisted mainly of watercolor illustrations in children's books. Collection comprises an autograph letter, signed E. V. B., written by Boyle to Mr. [L?]awley on May 11, regarding payment for wine glasses and his portrait in the Pall Mall Magazine.

Collection comprises an autograph letter, signed E. V. B., written by Boyle to Mr. [L?]awley on May 11, regarding payment for wine glasses and his portrait in the Pall Mall Magazine. On her Huntercombe Manor, Maidenhead, letterhead.

Collection

Charlotte Brontë needlepoint flower study, approximately 1840 0.9 Linear Feet — canvas, thread — ;frame 25 cm, 31 cm, 2 cm

Decorative needlepoint flower study on a cream background, possibly worked in wool thread, of a white lily at top, with light pink accents on leaves and blue stamen, surrounded by five green and blue-green leaves. At lower left is a deep pink peony with white accents, surrounded by three green and brown leaves with veins in brown and blue. At lower right is a red carnation, with pink and brown petal edges. It is surrounded by a carnation bud, and two green leaves with veins in brown and blue. Brontë completed the piece around 1840. It was placed underneath a green velvet mat with oval center opening measuring 11 x 14 cm, then enclosed in a wooden frame 25 x 31 cm, which was painted gold, then "antiqued" on three sides. In hand-painted black lettering on gold paint at the bottom of the frame appears the statement, "Sampler by Charlotte Bronte," although the work is not a sampler.
Collection
Anna Mitchell was a resident of Upland, California. Collection comprises a letter (14 pages) written by Anna Mitchell to Sarah, dated September 10, probably written later than 1920. Anna describes the illness and death of her six-year-old son, Preston, giving a day-by-day, sometimes an hour-by-hour, account of his symptoms, as well as treatments and diagnoses by a female doctor, Dr. Gregory. At first the diagnosis is rheumatism, then typhoid, then meningitis. Anna describes his "suffering so with the heat," with "pain down the right side in the region of the liver," "sunken cheeks," and crying with headache, fever, and vomiting. Paralysis comes later. Anna goes on to describe his death, the preparation of his body, the home viewing, and his cremation in Pasadena. She also describes her regrets and her grief; "... whose life was so much dearer to me than my own life, that since he is gone, nothing but darkness & sorrow is left us. Even for those that are left me--I cannot feel that I have courage or strength to make the effort to live."

Collection comprises a letter (14 pages) written by Anna Mitchell to Sarah, dated September 10, probably written later than 1920. Anna describes the illness and death of her six-year-old son, Preston, giving a day-by-day, sometimes an hour-by-hour, account of his symptoms, as well as treatments and diagnoses by a female doctor, Dr. Gregory. At first the diagnosis is rheumatism, then typhoid, then meningitis. Anna describes his "suffering so with the heat," with "pain down the right side in the region of the liver," "sunken cheeks," and crying with headache, fever, and vomiting. Paralysis comes later. Anna goes on to describe his death, the preparation of his body, the home viewing, and his cremation in Pasadena. She also describes her regrets and her grief; "... whose life was so much dearer to me than my own life, that since he is gone, nothing but darkness & sorrow is left us. Even for those that are left me--I cannot feel that I have courage or strength to make the effort to live." Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collection and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Collection comprises Edith Wharton's corrected Italian manuscript (34 typed pages) for her short story, "La Duchessa in Preghiera" (The Duchess at Prayer), originally published in English in Scribner's Magazine, August 1900, then by Scribner's in the collection of her stories, "Crucial Instances," 1901. The corrections are in Italian and are in Wharton's own hand.
Collection

Melanie Dornier photographs, 2013-2016 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 110 color inkjet prints — 11 3/4 x 8 inches

Collection consists of two documentary photography series taken in India by Melanie Dornier. "Mahila Thana: All Women Police Station" is comprised of 56 color digital photographs, taken in 2016, recording daily life inside the walls of the All Women Police Station of Gurugram, Haryana. The images convey the human impacts of woman-specific crimes and social justice, and the role of the police station and its female officers as a safe haven for distressed and abused women. The 54 color digital prints in "Punch My Face: Women's Boxing in India" document the daily life and experiences of Meena Kumari, a wife, mother, daughter, police officer, and boxer, 2013-2016. All prints measure 11 3/4 x 8 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection consists of two documentary photography series by Melanie Dornier taken in India. "Mahila Thana: All Women Police Station" is comprised of 56 color digital prints. The photographs - taken during 2016 - record daily life inside the walls of the All Women Police Station of Gurugram, Haryana. The 54 color digital prints in "Punch My Face: Women's Boxing in India, document the experiences of Meena Kumari, a wife, mother, buffalo owner, police officer, and boxer, between 2013 and 2016.

In an artist's statement Dornier describes that in 2012, "...the safety issues of the Indian women and gender violence were brought to the fore by the news of the gang rape and death of a young student in New Delhi, India. Since then funding and action plans have been implemented all around the country. In Gurugram, the millennium city in the state of Haryana, it was decided to open an All Women Police Station (AWPS) as in each of Haryana's districts and this was completed in August 2015. The project 'Mahila Thana,' which is 'All Women Police Station' in Hindi, documents the daily life inside the walls of the AWPS of Gurugram."

On "Punch My Face," Dornier reflects that, "Meena Kumari was born in December 1982 to a modest rural family. Now she is reaching the end of her boxing career and she hopes to soon become a police inspector. In 2001, Meena was one of the first Indian women to become a boxer and enjoyed visibility on the international scene. Her first major fight was confronting her father who believed boxing was not a respectable activity for a woman. Despite this Meena worked harder and harder and quickly reached the national and international stage in the flyweight category (51KG). Back then, female boxers were trained with young boys due to the shortage of women in the ring...at the end of 2016 and at the end of this photo documentary, we see Meena in the first months of her third pregnancy."

Dornier is the winner of the 2017 Bettye Lane Award for Feminist Photography, sponsored by the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection
African-American civil rights activist from Durham, N.C; subject of the 2002 film, An Unlikely Friendship. Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C. P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C.P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

Collection

Abortion Conversation Project records, 2000-2008 2.2 Linear Feet — 1600 Items

The Abortion Conversation Project was founded in 2000 to create strategies to challenge the stigma surrounding abortion. ACP was originally conceived as the 501(c)(3) sister to the National Coalition for Abortion Providers, a lobbying and trade organization for independent abortion providers. In July 2008, both organizations joined forces to form the Abortion Care Network. General administrative, financial, programmatic, and educational records; correspondence; founding documents; records of the board of directors; and files from Peg Johnston, co-founder of the Abortion Conversation Project. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes general administrative, financial, programmatic, and educational records; correspondence; founding documents; records of the board of directors; and files from Peg Johnston, co-founder of the Abortion Conversation Project. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Arbabi is an artist, DJ, writer, filmmaker, and zinester from Durham, NC and Austin, TX. She is the author of several craft and activist zines, including Radical South, Chicks Rock, and Polaroid-Celluloid. The collection consists of 34 zines (27 titles, produced between 1999 and 2007) collected by Arbabi. Eight of the zine titles in the collection were written or co-written by Arbabi. The majority of zines in the collection focus on either craftmaking and the do-it-yourself lifestyle or women's personal stories, including stories of abuse. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of 34 zines (27 titles, produced between 1999 and 2007) collected by Niku Arbabi. Eight of the zine titles in the collection were written or co-written by Arbabi. Arbabi acquired several of the zines in her collection from Parcell Press, a zine distro located in Richmond, Va. Zines authored by Arbabi that were purchased directly from Parcell Press are also included in this collection. The zines in the collection focus on craftmaking and the do-it-yourself lifestyle; feminist activism; and women's personal stories, including stories of abuse. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Ruth "Peach Pie" Webb Morgan is an African American native of Granville County, North Carolina. The collection contains material collected by Morgan from the church-related "Women's Conference" held at the Oxford Public Works Complex in Oxford, North Carolina in 1999, 2001, 2002, and 2004. Items include handouts, photographs, meeting agendas, and notebooks. The materials offer insights into the status and relationships of African American women in North Carolina, and their church-related affiliations and activities. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection contains material collected by Ruth Webb Morgan from the church-related "Women's Conference" held at the Oxford Public Works Complex in Oxford, North Carolina in 1999, 2001, 2002, and 2004. Items include handouts, photographs, meeting agendas, and notebooks. The materials offer insights into the status and relationships of African American women in North Carolina, and their church-related affiliations and activities.

The cookbooks originally in this collection have been cataloged separately for the Rubenstein Library collections. They may be located by performing a title search for the following items: FAVORITE RECIPES, FAVORITE RECIPES FROM THE FARMERS' ALMANAC, COUNTRY COOKIN' RECIPES, THE SENSATIONAL NIGHTINGALES COOKBOOK, ROYAL QUEEN COOKWARE TREASURY OF COOKING.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Raging Grannies is an activist organization that promotes peace, justice and social and economic equality by raising consciousness through song and satire. They also aim to challenge stereotypical assumptions about advocacy and aging. This collection contains materials documenting the Triangle chapter of the Raging Grannies in North Carolina from 1998-2015.

The Triangle Raging Grannies records consist of photographs, newspaper clippings, protest song lyrics, member lists, flyers and other paraphernalia related to the activities of the organization around the Triangle area of North Carolina.

Collection

Sarah Maitland Zine collection, 1997-2009 4 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Virginia-based writer Sarah Maitland began producing zines around 2001 and ran a zine distro for about three years. She was a founder of the Richmond Zine Fest which started in 2007. Approximately 220 titles from Sarah Maitland's personal zine collection, most dating between 1998 and 2008 and discussing a wide range of subjects. Also contains some material from Maitland's personal projects, as well as buttons, cassettes, stickers, and other ephemera.

This collection contains approximately 220 titles (some with multiple issues) from Sarah Maitland's personal zine collection, most dating between 1998 and 2008. The zines are largely about women, feminism, sexuality, and personal stories; specific subjects include feminism, sexual assault, political activism, parenting, vegan recipes, racism, bisexuality, pop culture, television shows, love, sex, mental disorders, higher education, sizism, punk rock, sex dichotomy, transgender issues, and media. Also contains some material from Maitland's personal projects, such as promotional materials from the Richmond Zine Fest, as well as buttons, cassettes, stickers, and other ephemera.

Collection
Strong Women Organizing Outrageous Projects (SWOOP) was a non-profit organization in Raleigh, NC that performed community service projects to help people and organizations in need of home repair and landscaping. The collection includes a series of photo albums and binders documenting SWOOP projects, as well as administrative materials. The binders include correspondence with partner organizations and SWOOP members as well as newsletters and notices about upcoming projects. Board meeting minutes, organizational efforts in the wake of Hurricane Fran, and publicity materials are also included in the collection.

The collection consists of a group of albums and binders that document SWOOP's projects, and a series of materials that document the group's organizational history. The albums contain photographs that document project work days, as well as descriptions of the projects and their locations. The binders contain correspondence with partner organizations and other relevant parties, information about ongoing projects, as well as newsletters and notices about upcoming events and projects. The administrative files comprise mostly board meeting materials, as well as newspaper clippings and publicity.

Collection
In 1996, Bitch: Feminst Response to Pop Culture was created by Lisa Jervis, Benjamin Shaykin, and Andi Zeisler. After having a hard time finding critiques of sexism in pop culture in magazines and self published zines, they decided to make their own. Their goals are to write about sexism in pop culture, propose alternatives, and promote pop products that are pro-woman and pro-feminism. Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Girl Germs Posters, 1996-1999 2 Linear Feet — 9 Items

The Coalition for Positive Sexuality is a grassroots, not-for-profit, activist organization funded through grants and donations. CPS seeks to give teens information about sexual health and safe sex, and to facilitate dialogue in public schools about sex education. This collection consists of nine 18x24 posters produced by artist Jeanette May for the CPS Girl Germs campaign.

The collection consists of nine 18x24 posters created and distributed as part of The Coalition for Positive Sexuality's Girl Germs campaign in the late 1990s. These posters were created by artist Jeanette May, who was also a founding member of the CPS.

The posters include a black-and-white image of teenage women along with texts offering information about sex and sexuality, as well as telephone numbers for additional resources. All posters are captioned in both English and Spanish. Subjects covered by the posters include abortion, condoms, water-based lubricant, sexuality (including homosexuality and bisexuality), sex education, and rape.

Collection

Stone Circles records, 1995-2012 11.4 Linear Feet — 19 boxes

The Stone Circles records contain materials documenting the history of the organization. These include press clippings, board meeting minutes. staff and financial information, program files, newsletters, event information, and correspondence.

Established in 1995, Stone Circles is a leading organization in the national movement toward a more spiritually-based form of activism. SC has introduced thousands of social change leaders and organizations to spiritual and reflective practice through workshops, retreats, trainings and strategic convenings. Stone Circles at the Stone House is located in Mebane, NC on 70 acres of farmland.

Collection

Amy Mariaskin Zine collection, 1995-2005 3 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Amy Mariaskin began collecting and trading zines with other women as a member of the Pittsburgh, PA, Riot Grrrl Chapter from 1995-2002. She authored the zine Southern Fried Darling from 1995-2002, and Vortext, about meteorology and weather. Collection consists of about 150 zines, mostly self-published by women and girls in the United States. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, music, mental health, depression and mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, transgender issues, and race. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of about 150 zines, mostly self-published by women and girls in the United States. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, music, mental health, depression and mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, transgender issues, and race. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Ailecia Ruscin is a writer, activist, and scholar from San Antonio, Texas and Auburn, Alabama. She is the author or co-author of the zines provo-CAT-ive and alabama grrrl (published from 1997-2000).

The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
The United Nations' Fourth World Conference on Women was held in Beijing, China, in 1995 and built on political agreements that had been reached at the three previous global conferences on women. Collection includes conference publications, information packets, schedules, and posters collected by attendee Margot Smith, as well as videos produced by Smith. All materials date from 1995 unless otherwise indicated.

Collection includes conference publications, information packets, schedules, and posters collected by attendee Margot Smith. Also included are recordings of conference proceedings and other videos produced by Margot and her company, Off Center Video. Margot's daughter, Janet Linney, was a videographer at the conference and helped produce the recordings. All materials date from 1995 unless otherwise indicated.

Collection
Marlene Sanders (b. 1931) is a female pioneer in broadcasting and an Emmy Award–winning correspondent, writer, producer, and broadcast-news executive. Collection contains eight VHS video tapes (VHS) regarding various aspects of feminism, especially its modern history. Some videotapes were created at the 30th Anniversary of the National Organization for Women in 1996. The others are dated 1997, and most include the series title "Veteran Feminists of America" on the label; one tape has "Choices--Meded: 25 Years of Choices." Accompanying the recordings is one published volume: Waiting for Prime Time: the Women of Television News.

Collection contains eight VHS video tapes (VHS) regarding various aspects of feminism, especially its modern history. Some videotapes were created at the 30th Anniversary of the National Organization for Women in 1996. The others are dated 1997, and most include the series title "Veteran Feminists of America" on the label; one tape has "Choices--Meded: 25 Years of Choices." Accompanying the recordings is one published volume: Waiting for Prime Time: the Women of Television News

Collection
Online
According to the organization's website, Southerners on New Ground (SONG) is an intersectional activist organization that works to build, connect, and sustain those in the South who believe in liberation across all lines of race, class, culture, gender and sexuality. It was established in 1994 following a National Lesbian and Gay Task Force meeting. SONG is currently headquartered in Atlanta with regional offices across the South. The accession (2009-0098) (9.6 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2004) includes administrative and financial records, programming materials, and organizational files, all stemming from retreats, training, workshops, and community events sponsored or promoted by SONG. The accession also includes SONG materials from the Bayard Rustin project, People of Color activities, Pride at Work, and the Highlander Economy Educational Institute, among others. The accession (2015-0113) (2.9 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2015) was donated by Caitlin Breedlove, Co-Director of SONG from 2006-2015. It includes administrative and financial records, programming information, flyers and promotional materials and research related to campaign initiatives from her time in the SONG leadership.

The accession (2009-0098) (9.6 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2004) includes administrative and financial records, programming materials, and organizational files, all stemming from retreats, training, workshops, and community events sponsored or promoted by SONG. The accession also includes SONG materials from the Bayard Rustin project, People of Color activities, Pride at Work, and the Highlander Economy Educational Institute, among others.

The accession (2015-0113) (2.9 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2015) was donated by Caitlin Breedlove, Co-Director of SONG from 2006-2015. It includes administrative and financial records, programming information, flyers and promotional materials and research related to campaign initiatives from her time in the SONG leadership. The accession also contains cards and artwork given to Caitlin by others, assorted photographs from events, two interview recordings, and many of her personal notebooks.

Collection
This collection consists of zines, primarily authored by women, acquired as donations from multiple collectors or purchased from book stores, zine fairs, and zine distributors. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.
Collection

Third Wave Foundation records, 1992-2011 3.5 Linear Feet — 2600 Items

Feminist activist organization that works nationally to support young women and transgender youth. Collection includes administrative files, fundraising materials, grant partner information, photographs, clippings, and conference materials. Also includes restricted electronic information. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes some administrative files, grant materials, research, fundraising, and conference files from the duration of Third Wave's existence, with the majority of files dating 1997-2006. Also includes photographs and clippings collected by Third Wave documenting various events and activities. Some materials are restricted, including board meeting minutes, electronic records, and audiovisual tapes. Please contact Research Services before visiting the library to use this collection.

Collection acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Highlands Women's Dialogue records, 1992-2010 1.2 Linear Feet — 500 Items

The Highlands Institute for American Religious and Philosophical Thought (HIARPT) was established in Highlands, North Carolina, as a result of the expansion of the American Journal of Theology and Philosophy. The Women's Dialogue began in 1992 as a means to discuss theology and philosophy from a feminist perspective. It hosts annual seminars and monthly discussion groups on feminist theology. Collection (2010-0173) (500 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 1992-2010) includes seminar files and materials from Women's Dialogue seminars, historical perspectives gathered by the Women's Dialogue members for their 10th anniversary, correspondence between members, information on speakers, finances, and membership rosters. Patricia Boyd's files, a separate series, contains additional seminar materials and other supplemental files on speakers and programs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection is separated into two series: the Women's Dialogue series and the Patricia Boyd Papers series. Despite this division, both series include corresponding files and materials from the activities of the Women's Dialogue.

The majority of the collection consists of program information and planning from the Dialogue's annual seminars. The earliest material dates from the 1996 seminar, but the seminars from the year 2001 and later all have more information and details. Common materials include the seminar's agenda, some information about its speaker, and other registration or logistical information. Other aspects of the collection include some historical financial records, mailing lists and rosters, and program files or speaker information.

One file is full of autobiographies of some of the Women's Dialogue founders, written in 1993. Another interesting component is the survey conducted by the Women's Dialogue during its tenth anniversary in 2001-2002, which resulted in the publishing of the History of the Women's Dialogue.

Collection

Lisa Jaronski zine collection, 1992-2005 5.4 Linear Feet — 9 boxes

A collection of about 470 zines, mostly of the personal nature, mostly written by women, acquired during the period of the late 1990s to early 2000s.

Collection consists of zines primarily from the U.S., with a small number from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Many of the zines were acquired through trade and larger organized swaps referred to as “Lazy Jane’s Zine Trades” arranged by the collector (ie: send in 30 copies of your zine, get 30 unique zines back from the other participants).

Collection
Materials documenting the Women's Worship Circle activities including correspondence, invitations, programs, handouts, liturgies, member reflections, photographs, planning and meeting notes and agendas.

The Women's Worship Circle records document the creation and operation of the organization, in which members engaged with and performed feminist theology through the development of their own worship services. The records consist of correspondence, liturgies, programs, meeting notes, handouts, members' reflections, photographs and invitations.

Collection
Jenny Zervakis was part of a wave of underground, do-it-yourself cartoonists who came of age during the Zine Revolution of the 1990s. Collection consists largely of issues of her "Strange Growths" autobiographical comic zine and "Urban Hiker," a Durham magazine to which Zervakis regularly contributed. Also included in the collection are other comics and writings by Zervakis, as well as an artist's statement. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists largely of issues of "Strange Growths" and "Urban Hiker." "Strange Growths" is an autobiographical comic zine that Zervakis began in 1991, featuring artwork and writing that address her life experiences. The "Urban Hiker" was a community-based magazine produced in Durham that provided entertainment and education through people's stories. Also included in the collection are other comics and writings by Zervakis, as well as an artist's statement.

Collection

Third Side Press records, 1991-2003 13.2 Linear Feet — 8775 items

Third Side Press, a feminist publisher of women's health and lesbian fiction books, was founded in 1991 and ceased active publication in 1998. It was dissolved as a corporation in 2003. During the years of active publication, Third Side Press produced between 20 and 25 titles, mostly in paperback, including top sellers such as CANCER AS A WOMEN'S ISSUE and THE WOMAN-CENTERED ECONOMY. Midge Stocker is the founder and publisher of Third Side Press. Materials include correspondence, financial records, book proofs and files, book reviews, and other records relating to the operation of Third Side Press publishing house. Also includes copies of several Third Side Press publications. Floppy disks and other electronic materials have been removed for preservation. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Materials include correspondence, financial records, book proofs and files, book reviews, and other records relating to the operation of Third Side Press publishing house. Also includes copies of several Third Side Press publications. Floppy disks and other electronic materials have been removed for preservation. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Sarah Wood Zine collection, 1990s 2 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Sarah Wood was the co-owner of GERLL Press, a zine distro based in Chicago, Ill., in the early to mid-1990s. The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Many of these zines come directly from the GERLL Press inventory, or were submitted to Wood and Curry by their authors to be considered for sale through the distro. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Sarabande Books is a non-profit literary press publishing poetry and fiction. The Sarabande Books records include materials documenting the founding of the company as well as yearly publishing materials.

This collection (accession #2000-0306) (4150 items, dated 1992-1996) documents the founding of the company. Many files mention editor and president Sarah Gorham and include start-up files, correspondence and author files, marketing materials, financial records, and other materials generated by the press. Also includes Gorham's memoir written during the first days of the press; files on prizes offered by the press (the Mary McCarthy Prize for short fiction and the Kathryn A. Morthon Prize for poetry); correspondence with authors Jane Mead, Lee Martin, Richard Frost, Sharon Bryan, Laura Jenson, Medbh McGuckian, and Liliana Ursu; and correspondence with Sallie Bingham about the formation of the press. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2001-0022) (2911 items, 4.4 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) continues to document the company's activities. Materials include correspondence files; author files; sales and marketing files; 24 color and 4 black-and-white photographs; 11 electronic (computer) files; and material relating to Sarabande's non-profit operations from 1996 to 1997. Much of the correspondence tracks letters to and from Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham. Authors represented include Dick Allen, Brian Griffin, Sharon Solwitz, Belle Waring, and Baron Wormser.

Addition (2002-0062) (2260 items, 6.3 linear feet; dated 1996-1998) comprises primarily author binders, files, and correspondence (1996-1998); and marketing and sales records, including examples of advertisements and reviews (1998). Also includes correspondence between Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham (1998); poetry and fiction galleys; documents related to the press' nonprofit activities, including 2 audio cassette tapes and paper records documenting board meetings (1998); 2 color and 10 black-and-white photographs and 1 black-and-white negative; and 18 electronic (computer) files originally received on one 3.5" diskette. Authors represented include Cathleen Hagenston, James Kimbrell, Stefanie Marlis, Shara McCallum, Jean Valentine, and Kate Walbert.

Addition (2003-0021) (2,300 items, 5.30 linear feet; dated 1995-2002) consists largely of author files (1997-2000) and printed material comprising journals and review publications (1998-1999). Also includes office correspondence (1995-2002); sales analyses, grant proposals, and marketing files (1996-2001); and documents related to conferences and events, special projects, board meetings, and nonprofit activities.

Addition (2004-0018) (4000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2001) includes author binders and files, correspondence, financial and marketing archives, and manuscript galleys. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2005-0019) (3695 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2001) primarily comprises authors' binders, including incoming and outgoing correspondence, as well as typescript drafts and galleys. Also includes reviews, press releases, and advertisements; notes from sales conferences and board meetings; consortium sales analyses; a non-profit activity file; and organizational materials for Sarabande-in-Education, a website program for college students and teachers. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2006-0025) (3,750 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2002) comprises correspondence, drafts, galleys, marketing and biographical files, contracts, press releases, and book reviews. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2007-0041) (6,000 items, 9.2 lin. ft.; dated 1996-2003) contains autographed books, authors' files, manuscripts, the contents of author binders, marketing files, board meeting files, nonprofit activitiy files, Lila Wallace materials, sales kits, a Writer's Almanac CD, and a Sallie Bingham rehearsal tape for Short Fiction Series.

Addition (2008-0028) (4,500 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains author files, correspondence, marketing files and galleys for books published in 2004-2005. Also included are 2 CDR's of the Writer's Almanac.

Addition (2009-0092) (8325 items; 11.1 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2009) includes administrative files, book reviews, press releases, author files and correspondence, and manuscripts and drafts from authors published by Sarabande.

Addition (2010-0028) (9000 items; 12.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2010) includes administrative files, Sarabande correspondence with authors, author files, poetry and fiction finalists, and various book reviews and advertisements.

Addition (2011-0076) (6750 items; 9.0 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2011) includes materials from conferences, non-profit activities, grants, correspondence, marketing, staffing, finances, and author files.

Addition (2012-0046) (3188 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2011) includes correspondence, publicity files, author files, and manuscripts.

Addition (2013-0158) (5625 items; 7.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2012) includes author files, reviews, manuscripts, author correspondence and administrative materials.

Addition (2015-0150) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2014) includes administrative materials and author correspondence, foundation research and correspondence, and author files.

Addition (2015-0151) (2250 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2009-2015) includes administrative files, author files and author binders.

Addition (2016-0311) (3.0 lin. ft; dated 2011-2016) consists chiefly of author files. Also contains files related to prizes and awards.

Addition (2018-0011) (4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2016-2018) consists of publicity and author files that contain drafts of recently published works.

Addition (2019-0093) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2015-2017) consists of author files, including Sallie Bingham's publishing agreement and drafts of works.

Addition 2021-0075 (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2019-2020) includes author files for books published in 2019 and 2020, Sarabande Writing Labs brochure, 2019 and 2020 catalogs, press releases and reviews for 2019 and 2020 books, and annual reports.

Addition 2022-0084 (3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1990 and 2010-2022) includes author files, Sarabande Writing Labs anthologies, catalogs, promotional ephemera, a poetry broadsides.

Collection

Ayun Halliday papers, 1990-2021 13 Linear Feet — 19 boxes — 11.0 linear feet

Ayun Halliday is an American writer and actress. Her works center primarily on the areas of motherhood, travel, and women's social issues. The Ayun Halliday Papers contain her writings including books, plays, and the zine East Village Inky; as well as correspondence and ephemera related to her publications; zines by others and artwork.

The Ayun Halliday Papers are arranged into the following nine series: Correspondence, Grants and Awards, Workshops and speaking engagements, Writings-Books, Writings-Plays, Writings-Zines, Writings-Other Publications, Mail Art Publications (by others), and Zines by Others.

The first seven of these series comprise Halliday's personal writings and works including books, plays, artwork and the zine East Village Inky. The collection also includes correspondence and ephemera related to her publications, as well as items associated with workshops and speaking engagements given by Halliday about underground press publications, female travel, autobiographical writing and other topics.

The final two series represent more than 200 zines and works Halliday collected from others artists obtained primarily through trade with other creators. These publications span a wide range of subjects intended for both adults and children including feminism, motherhood, child rearing, New York City, zines, art, music, travel, food and cooking, body image and consciousness, sexual education, and more.

Collection
NWSA Journal, an official publication of the National Women's Studies Association, publishes interdisciplinary, multi-cultural feminist scholarship linking feminist theory with teaching and activism. Accession 2003-0263 (26,100 items; 43.5 lin. ft.; dated 1990-1998 and undated) comprises administrative files, records of the site search and other editorial board policy matters, correspondence, annual and semi-annual reports, copyedited manuscripts, readers' reports, and published manuscripts; and revisions of issues from each volume. Addition (06-006) (7 items, .1 lin. ft.; dated 1990-1998) comprises 7 issues of the NWSAction newsletter, Fall 1990-Summer 1998.Addition (06-039) (375 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2003) contains final page proofs, abstracts, advertising, research and proposals, and correspondence generated for the special issue Gender and Modernity, Fall 2003, volume 15, number 3. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2003-0263) (26,100 items; lin. ft.; dated 1990-1998 and undated) comprises administrative files, records of the site search and other editorial board policy matters, correspondence, annual and semi-annual reports, copyedited manuscripts, readers' reports, and published manuscripts; and revisions of issues from each volume.

The 2006 addition (2006-0006) (7 items, 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 1990-1998) comprises 7 issues of the NWSAction newsletter, Fall 1990-Summer 1998.

The 2006 addition (2006-0039) (375 items, 0.2 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2003) contains final page proofs, abstracts, advertising, research and proposals, and correspondence generated for the special issue Gender and Modernity, Fall 2003, volume 15, number 3.

The 2007 addition (2007-0118) (2630 items; 4.8 lin. ft.; dated 2003-2007) contains manuscripts, journal submissions, proofs, and editorial files related to 2005-2007 issues. Also included are a procedure manual, correspondence, administrative and editorial files, copies of published journals (2004-2007), and newsletters. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The 2009 addition (2009-0007) (29 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 2003-2008) contains 4 published journals (2007-2008) and electronic materials used in the creation of the journal, including 19 CDs, 5 zip discs, and 1 USB key. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The 2015 addition (2009-0098) (0.3 lin. ft.; dated 1978-2011) contains 1 box of material documenting the work of the National Women's Studies Association Journal from Margaret (Maggie) McFadden. It comprises administrative files, records of the site search and other editorial board policy matters, correspondence, journal proposals and information about applicants considered for employment. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Lynnsy Logue is a sculptor and founder of the Wonderful Women organization. She worked with Rachel Watkins to create The Homecoming Queens project in the mid-1990s. The collection includes a scrapbook and a videotape from The Homecoming Queens public arts project, as well as some research materials about women around the world and some materials on a vigil for the Montreal 14 held in Charlotte in 1989. The Homecoming Queens was a traveling exhibit of life-size mannequins and papier-mache dolls that represented women suffering from various social and political issues around the world, including female genital mutilation, rape, abuse, war, aging, and sexism. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection includes a scrapbook and a videotape from The Homecoming Queens public arts project, as well as some research materials about women around the world and some materials on a vigil for the Montreal 14 held in Charlotte in 1989.

Collection

Claudia Horwitz papers, 1988-2013 8.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Collection contains personal and professional papers of Claudia Horwitz, a Chapel Hill spiritual activist, author, and founder of Stone Circles.

Collection includes, but is not limited to writings, research and subject files, project files, talks/speeches, and files documenting group work.

Collection

Donnamarie Mazzola papers, 1988-1995 3.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes

The Donnamarie Mazzola papers document feminist activism in Philadelphia in the 1980s-90s. The collection includes materials from training courses from various feminist coalitions working to end domestic and sexual violence against women, syllabi for Women Organized Against Rape trainings, materials from various Take Back the Night marches, clippings, and periodicals.

Collection documenting feminist activism in Philadelphia in the 1980s-90s, including materials from training courses from various feminist coalitions working to end domestic and sexual violence against women, syllabi for Women Organized Against Rape trainings, materials from various Take Back the Night marches, clippings, and periodicals.

Collection

Lesbian Health Resource Center records, 1987-2005 4.5 Linear Feet — 3375 Items

Durham-based community organization that provided health advice and workshops for lesbians. Successor to the North Carolina Lesbian and Gay Health Project, founded in 1982. The LHRC opened in 1996. Collection includes administrative materials, grant and funding applications, volunteer orientation agendas, and a resource library maintained by the LHRC during the 1990s. Topics include mental and physical health for lesbians, in particular HIV/AIDS prevention, breast cancer prevention and screenings, and safe sex practices. Also includes materials about the LHRC's plans for a Lesbian Health Clinic in North Carolina, its ongoing relationships with other community organizations, and workshop materials on feminism, health, and leadership. Membership and participation lists are closed until 2030. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The records of the LHRC are in many was a continuation of the records from the North Carolina Lesbian and Gay Health Project, also held by the Bingham Center. Early materials frequently reference or were created by NCLGHP members, and there are also overlapping interests with some resources for gay men, despite the fact that the majority of the materials are targeted towards the lesbian community and their activities in the Triangle.

The grant materials and other financial files that make up the first series include applications, correspondence, and general information about the budget of the LHRC and the grants that it sought for programs and operations. Also included in this series are materials from the 501(c)3 application, as well as some correspondence from the IRS regarding the organization's tax status.

The LHRC's Lesbian Health Clinic files detail the planning and fundraising by the organization in preparation for opening the LHC. This series includes correspondence, steering committee minutes, handouts from different fundraising and awareness events, and other notes and research about healthcare and the operation of a health clinic.

The collection's subject files are largely drawn from the LHRC Resource Library, which was maintained by the LHRC for use by its members. Topics include healthcare, particularly women's health and lesbian health; cancer, especially breast cancer; AIDS and the spread of HIV; safe sex; domestic violence; parenting; homophobia, especially within the medical community; and other topics like health reading materials or other resources.

Some of the LHRC's activities and events are documented in the fourth series, including information and planning materials from the NCGLHP's participation in the Breast Cancer Leadership Summit and subsequent breast cancer awareness events in the early 1990s. Other activities represented include North Carolina Pride Days, breastcasting, a lesbian sex group, and general healthcare workshops.

Finally, the administrative files relate to the running of the LHRC, including everything from document masters for letterhead and logos to the volunteer orientation materials from orientations as late as 2005. Also includes some information from partner organizations, including the Mautner Project, Lesbian Avengers, and local community organizations including Triange Community Works. Related to this series is the Oversize Materials series, which consists of two document masters for posters promoting awareness about breast cancer and AIDS in the lesbian community.

The Restricted series is actually just one box of material, mainly membership and participation lists, which is closed until 2030.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Lisa Unger Baskin collection of materials about Anzia Yezierska, 1987-1988, 1987-1988 0.5 Linear Feet — Guide to the Lisa Unger Baskin collection of materials about Anzia Yezierska, 1987-1988

Anzia Yezierska (1880-1970) was a Polish-American author. Collection consists of materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin about the publication of "Anzia Yezierska: A Writer's Life," a biography by Yezierska's daughter, Louise Levitas Henriksen, published in 1988. Materials include drafts of a New York Times book review by Helen Yglesias. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Galley proof, unbound book manuscript, dust jacket, and materials regarding the publication of Anzia Yezierska: A Writer's Life, written by Louise Levitas Henriksen and Jo Ann Boydston in 1988. Includes a typescript draft with manuscript corrections of a review of the book by Helen Yglesias, later published in the New York Times.

Collection

Kentucky Foundation for Women records, 1985-2017 66.5 Linear Feet — 168 Gigabytes

Online
Sallie Bingham was the founder and first Executive Director of the Kentucky Foundation for Women and profoundly shaped its goals. The overall purpose of the Foundation is to support feminist women in the arts. The collection includes materials about grassroots feminist activism, philanthropy, not-for-profit organizations and artistic patronage, feminist art, and women's culture. Additionally, the collection includes grant applications and files, files for the publication, The American Voice, and information on the Hopscotch House and Wolf Pen Writers Colony, among other materials.

The Kentucky Foundation for Women Records span the dates 1985-2017. The collection provides a rich source of information about grassroots feminist activism, philanthropy, not-for-profit organizations and artistic patronage, feminist art and women's culture. The records of the Foundation include a range of materials, primarily a large number of grant files, including applications and supporting materials of those awarded grants. Also notable are the files for its publication, The American Voice, which include correspondence, copy-edited drafts of poetry and other writings, business records, other publications, miscellaneous ephemera, broadsides, and books of poetry. In addition, there is information on the Hopscotch House and Wolf Pen Writers Colony, miscellaneous correspondence, subject files, annual reports, newsletters, and brochures. The records consist primarily of files, but videocassettes, audiocassettes, and compact disks are also included. The collection is divided into four series: Administrative Files, Project Files, American Voice Files, and Grant Files.

The Administrative Files Series contains Foundation newsletters; administrative correspondence; minutes of Board of Directors meetings; and financial, legal and tax papers. The Project Files Series contains papers on short-term special projects, as well as long-term projects such as the Hopscotch House and the Wolf Pen Women Writers Colony. The American Voice Files Series contains information regarding the publication of the feminist literary journal The American Voice. The series contains correspondence between the editors ( Frederick Smock and Sallie Bingham) and contributors; copy-edited drafts of poetry, prose, and non-fiction essays; business records; broadsides; chapbooks (i.e. hand-bound books); miscellaneous publications; and a partially complete run of the journal. Some of the better-known authors to be published in The American Voice include: Paula Gunn Allen, Isabel Allende, Wendell Berry, Jorge Louis Borges, Kay Boyle, Jo Carson, Andrea Dworkin, Elaine Equi, Doris Grumbach, Joy Harjo, Fenton Johnson, Robin Morgan, Marge Piercy, Reynolds Price, Joyce Carol Oates, and Anne Firor Scott.

Finally, the largest series, the Grant Files Series, contains documentation on the evolution of the Foundation's grant program over the years, as well as files on those projects that received grant monies from the Foundation from 1986 to 1993. The Foundation awarded grants to both men and women, though women are in the majority. The grants supported the work of visual artists, writers, scholars, musicians, composers, documentary and fiction filmmakers, playwrights, painters, sculptors, puppeteers, quilters and other fabric artists, political activists, advocates for physically handicapped women, and those concerned with women and religion and women's employment issues. A unique concern of the grant givers was supporting the exploration and improvement of the situation of women in Appalachia, encouraging women to explore and study the wilderness, and defining and encouraging the emerging field of Ecofeminism.

The addition (Accession 2001-0012) (2208 items, 3.8 lin. ft.; dated 1986-1999) continues to document the process of publishing The American Voice. Materials include correspondence, board minutes, grant applications and evaluations, financial statements, video (3) and audio (4) cassettes and one audio compact disc, and information files for volumes 32-49. Also included are writings by Sallie Bingham. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The addition (Accession 2007-0126) (5 lin. ft.) consists primarily of files documenting the organization's grant program, and also includes project files, files related to the feminist literary journal The American Voice, publications, and files from Hopscotch House.

Collection
Lesbian feminist choral group established in the Durham-Raleigh-Chapel Hill area (N.C.) in 1983. The Common Woman Chorus records contain material dating from 1985 to 2010. The records primarily comprise sheet music, concert programs, publicity, correspondence, and administrative records. Although the records contain mostly print material, they also include some color photographs, audiocassettes, videos, electronic word documents, t-shirts, and sweatshirts. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Common Woman Chorus records contain material dating from 1985 to 2015 relating to the group's musical and fund-raising activities. The records primarily comprise sheet music, concert programs, publicity, correspondence, and administrative records. Although the records contain mostly print material, a few color photographs, audiocassettes, videos, electronic word documents, t-shirts, and sweathirts are also included. Use copies of original audiovisual recordings will need to be created before items can be accessed by researchers. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Sarah Dyer Zine collection, 1985-2005 18.3 Linear Feet — 2050 Items

Approximately 2000 individual zines and nearly 800 titles, most self-published by women and girls 1985-2000. Most were produced in the United States, a few come from Canada and other countries. In-house database with subject access available. Subjects include feminism, riot grrrl, body image and consciousness, sexual abuse, music, mental illness, film, poetry, rock and punk music, comics, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality and bisexuality, and erotica. The collection includes four audiocassette tapes and one VHS tape. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition #1 (2002-0319) contains approximately 150 titles.

Addition #2 (2006-0068) contains approximately 150 titles and are separated into two groups: those authored by women and those authored by men.

Addition #3 (2008-0030) contains approximately 175 titles and one VHS tape.

Collection

OutRight records, 1983-1995 5.25 Linear Feet

OutRight is a Triangle-area organization that was founded in 1990 and is now disbanded. OutRight provided support for gay youth and other young people with questions about their sexual orientation. The OutRight records consist of meeting minutes, correspondence, financial records, resources and programs (including clippings, flyers, and pamphlets), and literature on AIDS and sexuality. The materials also include reports on nationwide trends and LGBTQ issues.

The OutRight Records chiefly consist of minutes from meetings, correspondence, financial records, publicity (including clippings, flyers, and pamphlets), and literature on AIDS and sexuality. Also included are reports on nationwide trends and LGBTQ issues, the organization's by-laws, fundraising, correspondence, program planning, and administrative information.

Collection
Bill Brown is a filmmaker, photographer, and zinester from Lubbock, Texas. His films explore the landscapes of North America, including the United States–Mexico border, North Dakota missile silos, and the Trans-Canada Highway, and have been exhibited at film festivals and museums around the world. He received a BFA from Harvard in 1992 and a MFA from CalArts in 1997. Brown is the author of a zine called Dream Whip as well as a novel on the underground in L.A., Saugus to the Sea. In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

In January 2013, Bill Brown donated his personal collection of zines, comprising 186 titles and almost 250 issues in total. Although Brown never actively collected zines, he was always eager to barter and trade with other zine makers. The resulting collection includes zines spanning from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. The zines are arranged alphabetically by title.

Collection
Libby Gilbert is a zine collector and publisher. Gilbert's zines include The Ten Condiments (1988-1989) and Ancient Grandma Secrets (1990-1997). Collection includes Gilbert's zines, acquired through trade, purchase, or self-publishing. Most zines focus on music or culture. Collection is arranged alphabetically by zine title.

In February 2012, Libby Gilbert donated her personal collection of music zines and magazines, comprising 47 different titles and over 100 issues in total. Originally obtained through trade, purchase, or self-publishing, the titles in her collection span the years 1981-1996, and the common thread is the underground rock music scene in the United States and abroad, with particular focus on the Pacific Northwest, where she lived during much of that time. In 1988 and 1989, she published music and poetry zine The Ten Condiments with Kaija Campos (then Kaija Berleman), and later published her own music zine, Ancient Grandma Secrets, from 1990-1997. A 2022 addition to this collection expanded the title list and includes includes zine originals (layouts, art, etc.) from Ancient Grandma Secrets and Ten Condiments.

Collection

Renee Chelian Papers, 1981-1995 6 Linear Feet — 5 boxes

Renee Chelian founded the Northland Family Planning Center, a women's healthcare and abortion clinic in the Detroit area. The Renee Chelian papers include professional papers related to the Northland Family Planning Center, including materials related to anti-abortion groups picketing the clinic, as well as materials related to Chelian's involvement with national women's healthcare organizations.

The Renee Chelian papers include professional papers related to Chelian's clinic, Northland Family Planning in Detroit, Michigan, and her work with national organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Organization for Women. Materials relate mostly to her work at the Northland Family Planning clinic during the 1990s and include newspaper clippings, photographs, pro-choice and anti-abortion materials, completed surveys from patients, family, and friends who visited the clincs, and administrative documents related to escort training, office supplies, and staff information.

The collection also contains materials, such as hate mail and pamphlets, related to anti-abortion groups and their picketing of the Northland Family clinic. Folders titled Saturday contain photographs of the picketors and picketing information of the anti-abortion protesting at the clinic. Materials also relate to other anti-abortion materials, including papers related to the harassment of other abortion providers and the murder of Dr. David Gunn, and anti-clinic organizations such as Operation Rescue, Life Dynamics, Prolife Action League, Feminists for Life, crisis pregnancy centers and leaders such as Randall Terry and Joe Scheidler.

Also included are materials from other women's health organizations and campaigns, including Stand Up For Women, Project Choice, and Operation Rescue. Some of the anti-abortion materials contain explicit images.

Collection
The Association of Professional Communication Consultants (APCC) is an organization dedicated to educating new consultants and helping existing consultants expand and improve their businesses. The APCC records also include materials from the Association of Professional Writing Consultants (APWC), the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), and the Association of Business Communication (ABC). These entities often worked together on projects and workshops aimed at educating consultants and spreading knowledge about the profession. The collection comprises administrative materials, information about workshops, and documents belonging to former APCC President Barbara Shwom.

The collection is arranged into the following 2 series: Administrative/Organizational materials and former APCC President Barbara Shwom materials. The APCC administrative and organizational materials date from 1983 to 2017 and comprise membership directories, correspondence, budgetary and financial information, meeting minutes, and workshop handouts. The Barbara Shwom materials date from the 1981 to the 2000 and comprise her personal correspondence and APWC materials.

Collection
Judy Woodruff is a broadcast journalist covering U.S. politics whose career has spanned work at NBC, CNN, and PBS. This collection documents her professional life, consisting of extensive research and subject files, correspondence including viewer mail, speaking appearances and engagements, and service including the Duke University Board of Trustees and the Interntional Women's Media Foundation.

The collection includes files documenting Woodruff's journalism career with CBS, NBC, the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour, CNN and other news outlets as well as her service at Duke on the Board of Trustees, and the board of the International Women's Media Foundation. Files range from extensive research and subject files to project files, viewer correspondence, interview material, writings, speeches, and audio/visual materials.

Collection
North Carolinians Against Racist and Religious Violence (NCARRV) was an activist group based in Durham, NC from 1983-1997 that worked to document hate crimes and hate groups including white supremacists, assist victims, raise awareness, and influence public policy across the state, and these records document their work. Collection includes founding documents, bylaws, meeting files, board meeting documents, photographs, audiovisual materials, administrative materials, grants and grant applications, incident reports, publications, subject and extensive newspaper clippings on racist violence and white supremacy movements in North Carolina.

The North Carolinians Agaist Racist and Religious Violence records document the history of this grassroots activist organization. Collection materials include administrative files, publications, press releases, meeting materials, notes, grants and grant applications, clippings, subject files, photographs and audiovisual materials.

The Administrative Materials series contains files generated by NCARRV's daily work, including letterhead stationery and forms, personnel files, an audit report, licensing documentation, event photographs, incident reports documenting individual hate crimes, NCARRV business meetings, and project files including Hold On! a video produced by NCARRV about hate crimes in Robeson County, NC. There is also documentation of their youth projects and workshops, as well as a grant-funded educational project at NC Central University. That project examined police community relations, an advisory board of police chiefs across the state that looked at how to improve police relationships with communities of color, and published a report called No Reverence For Life.

The Publications and Public Messaging series contains NCARRV's publications and public relations materials, including Annual Reports, Special Reports, Newsletters, Updates, press releases, and other public messaging files.

The Development series contains materials relating to NCARRV's fund-raising activities. It includes files with information about individual membership donations and grant funding. There is a card file with member information as well as routine correspondence. The bulk of this series consists of information from funding organizations and NCARRV's grant application materials.

The Research Files series consists chiefly of NC newspapers clippings on the topic of racist violence from NCARRV's subscription to the Carolina Clippings Service. Also included are photographs documenting hate group marches, subject files, and research and class notes. There are publications from nonprofit groups whose mission relates to NCARRV's. These materials consist of pamphlets, essays, reports, newsletters, periodical issues, and annual reports.

The Audio/Visual series consists of 18 audiocassettes and 42 videocassettes. The audiocassetes contain recordings of phone messages left by Klan members, KKK rallies, and a recording of Mab Segrest speaking at a "Hands off My Neighbor" symposium. The videotapes chiefly consist of copies of and research for "Hold On!: Robeson County's Fight for Justice" produced by NCARRV in 1988. Other video contents include trial coverage, a 1990 Gay Pride March in Raleigh, and recordings of television news shows about racism.

Collection

The way it was, or at least how I remember experiencing it, 1980-1986 0.6 Linear Feet — 1 upright hollinger, 1 upright half-hollinger — 956 typescript pages

Collection comprises Lola Frances Wilson Smith's 920-page typescript autobiography, including Wilson and Carroll family history, focusing on the period between 1909, when her parents married, and 1944, when she gave birth to her first child. Includes an additional 36 pages of introductory material where Smith describes herself. Smith accompanies her narrative with hand-drawn maps and illustrations or photocopies of illustrative material from other sources. She also includes copies of documents (marriage licenses, government documents, certificates, etc.) obituaries, genealogical charts, newspaper articles, family photographs, and private letters. Pages 885 to 920 are included as representative of Smith's working draft for the piece.
Collection
Terry Schooley is a feminist organizer, teacher, and former Delaware state representative. She was a leader in the National Organization for Women and served as Coordinator of the North Carolina ERA Countdown Campaign. This collection consists of Schooley's North Carolina ERA Countdown Campaign report (1982); clippings and publicity about the Equal Rights Amendment ratification campaign; photographs and ephemera collected from various marches, events, and outreach encouraging ERA ratification by North Carolina; and some related materials and correspondence from Eleanor Smeal and Governor Jim Hunt. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of Schooley's report and collected materials from her leadership of the ERA Countdown Campaign's North Carolina Ratification Project. The report appears to have been prepared for the National Organization for Women (NOW), and includes her assessments and conclusions about what parts of the campaign were successful versus where the organization struggled. The report also contains Schooley's overview of the North Carolina campaign's legislative strategy, including how they introducing the amendment for ratification in 1982 despite the N.C. General Assembly's Gentleman's Agreement; subsequent administrative and logistical campaign activities; fundraising; outreach and publicity; recruitment of action teams and their subsequent conversion into NOW chapters; and records of lobbying and stated ERA positions of each N.C. state representative.

Also present in the collection are newspaper clippings and ephemera documenting attitudes and coverage of the ERA Countdown and the women's movement in North Carolina during the early 1980s.

Schooley's snapshots and photographs include images of the ERA Rally in Raleigh, including podium speakers Eleanor Smeal and Jim Hunt; NOW speakers and conferences; and other North Carolina NOW participants in 1981-1982.

Collection also contains some audiovisual materials: two audiocassettes that appear to contain recordings of Schooley's remarks at the N.C. ERA Rally in Raleigh in 1982, and several video recordings of NOW commercials and media spots from 1981.

Collection
Ann Lovett is an artist who teaches at the State University of New York at New Paltz. This collection documents her artistic and academic career with a focus on her work in the book arts.

The collection contains materials documenting Lovett's artistic and academic career, including artists' book production materials and photographs.

Collection

Womonwrites records, 1979-2014 3.0 Linear Feet — 1875 Items

Womonwrites is an annual conference of lesbian writers. Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, meeting evaluations, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

RESTRICTIONS: Membership mailings lists, in Box 3, are CLOSED until 2020.

Collection

Kathleen Hannan papers, 1979-2007 0.6 Linear Feet — 150 items

Kathleen Hannan is a songwriter, teacher, and musician based in Hillsborough, North Carolina. Her music relates to feminist, environmental, and LGBT community issues; she has also written songs for children. She is a past winner of the North Carolina Arts Council's Songwriter Fellowship, and was also a finalist in the Triangle Folk Music Society's songwriting contest. The collection includes sheet music, lyrics, photographs, clippings, correspondence, press releases, 1 cassette tape, and 3 compact discs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection includes sheet music, lyrics, photographs, clippings, correspondence, press releases, 1 cassette tape, and 3 compact discs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Becky Mock papers, 1978-2016 4.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes

Becky Mock is a political and social activist in Alamance County, N.C. who is one of the founders of the Women's Resource Center of Alamance County. These papers contain materials that document the nonprofit organizations she worked with, as well as her work as a political activist. Her work focuses on women's and family issues. Materials include newsletters, fliers, board meeting minutes, grant applications, program materials, email correspondence, and publications.

The Becky Mock papers consist of administrative files, grant applications, programming materials, newsletters, board meetings, and outreach materials from the Women's Resource Center in Alamance County and other local nonprofit organization. There are subject files on topics such as welfare reform, women's employment, women's education, domestic violence, public transportation, healthcare, and women's political issues, as well as a number of publications focused on women's issues.

Collection
This collection documents the work of the Durham, NC environmental artist Bryant Holsenbeck. It contains materials collected over the course of her career, including media clippings, publicity, photographs, and a portfolio.

This collection includes gallery materials, correspondence, postcards, publicity materials, exhibit posters, clippings about Bryant Holsenbeck, documentation of Holsenbeck's work, photographs, a DVD production about Holsenbeck, and an art portfolio.

Collection
Mary Peblow was a white woman who lived in Brooklyn, New York, during the late twentieth century and appears to have spent the majority of her later years in temporary public housing or welfare assistance hotels. This collection consists of Peblow's early 1990s correspondence to her cousin, Lillian Aubery, who also resided in Brooklyn. Peblow's letters document some characteristics of an ongoing mental illness; her distrust and dislike of healthcare systems and nursing homes, different charity organizations, and New York's government assistance programs; and her beliefs that she and her family were victims of Democratic or global conspiracies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the History of Medicine Collection.

This majority of this collection consists of Peblow's early 1990s correspondence to her cousin, Lillian Aubery, who resided in Brooklyn. Peblow's letters are written in black marker, on manila folders or postcards, and usually have no envelopes - the postage was applied directly on the item being mailed. Mary occasionally included her current address; she was moving around Brooklyn during the period of this correspondence.

The letters are all addressed to her cousin (at times 'babysitter') Lily or Lillian, and tend to revolve around repetitive themes: Mary's mother's care in different nursing homes and her death and burial; Mary's uncle Ralph Aubery's death and her theories about what happened to him; Lillian's return (or lack of return) correspondence, and Mary's occasional attempts to visit (unsuccessfully, according to these letters); Mary's distrust of Louise Aubery, described as Lillian's friend; Mary's dislike of Democrats and liberal policies, including "welfare hotels" like those she lived in. In some letters she relays some of her struggles of living unhoused in New York - for example: "I awoke at 6am to find my shopping cart with its four precious bags had vanished! And of course the Gold St. Police ignored me" (1991 May 1). She occasionally mentions current events, like the dissolution of the Soviet Union, and some New York politicians or mayors. When reading the letters in the collection, it can be challenging to discern whether Mary was writing about current or past events.

Mary described herself as a "W.A.S.P. minority" and considered herself to be oppressed and persecuted by Democratic Party policies. For example, one letter (undated, but from the 1990s): "Miss Mary, this political victim, has been kept in these metro "hotels" since Feb 1972 - Jamaica "welfare" sent me to Brooklyn (punishment) ((for complaining)) - the harassment focused Springfield "welfare" with its prevaricating lackeys; the ecumenical churches up there; scared me back down here to Empire State - too bad - nobody's going to rent to me in Brooklyn Heights, that's for sure...".

A standalone letter that accompanied this collection dates from 1978 and is directed to Lillian Aubery from Louise and Ralph Aubery. Louise writes: "Have not heard from Mary, I suppose she thinks it is not worth thanking for the money Ralph sent her. Those cardboard letters she sends are all the same messages about people long since gone, however she mentions, a surprise check from the south(?) arrives once in a while. Albert Doody the cops daughter from Mrs. Brett. Have not heard a word from Gertie suppose she can't write as her eyesight is very bad." By the 1990s, Gertrude Peblow, Ralph Aubery, and Louise Aubery were all deceased, but Mary mentioned them frequently in her letters to Lillian. This letter from 1978 suggests that Mary had been writing in this style for many years.

Collection
Marilyn Crafton Smith is a retired faculty member at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC whose collection includes documentation of the activities of the National Organization for Women, the fight for the Equal Rights Amendment, feminism in Western North Carolina, and LGBT printed matter.

Materials documenting the life and work of scholar, activist, and collector of feminist and LGBTQ print culture including student work, teaching files, clippings, Boone Area and Iowa City National Organization for Women (NOW) files, Western NC LGBTQ organization and event files,Southeastern Women's Studies Association (SEWSA) files, Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) files, Center for Research on Women (Duke and Memphis State University) files, social movement t-shirts, magazines, newspapers, journals, pamphlets, and books; and a Bride Bingo game.

Collection
The Women's Theological Center, founded in 1981 and active through 2007, was a Boston-based organization that provided feminist theological and ministerial education for women. Collection consists of administrative records documenting the foundation and development of the WTC, as well as board meeting and other committee notes. Also included are grant applications and funding requests, publicity and programming materials (especially related to the Study/Action program), and writings and publications. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of administrative records documenting the foundation and development of the WTC, as well as board meeting and other committee notes from Francine Cardman and Gay Harter. Budgets, membership information, and reports are also in the administrative records. Collection also includes grant applications and funding requests, publicity and programming materials, and writings and publications. The publicity and programming materials document the WTC's activities and include articles, brochures, and event programs, as well as information, readings, and other materials from the Study/Action program. Most of the Study/Action material is from Gay Harter's files. Writings and publications include WTC newsletters, drafts of an unpublished book about the Study/Action program, and other writings by WTC members.

WTC members who appear frequently in the administrative records, particularly meeting minutes, as well as Study/Action materials and WTC newsletters include Donna Bivens, Nancy Richardson, Marian (Meck) Groot, Angelica (Gay) Harter, Francine Cardman, and Joan Martin.

Collection
Anne Baker was an abortion counselor, serving as the Director of Counseling at the Hope Clinic for Women in Granite City, Illinois for the majority of her career. The Anne Baker papers consist of informational pamphlets, handouts, forms, workshop evaluations, personal writings, newspaper clippings, photographs, correspondence, VCRs, DVDs, cassettes, buttons, and sweatshirts.

The Anne Baker papers contains documentation of Baker's personal life and of her professional role as the Director of Counseling at the Hope Clinic of Granite City, Illinois. They include materials from workshops and trainings she gave, secondary literature about abortion counseling, correspondence, materials from different protests that she and other Hope Clinic staff attended, personal notes, histories of the Hope Clinic, and newspaper clippings from the kidnapping of Dr. Hector Zevallos and his wife Jean Rosalie Zevallos.

Collection

Susan Hill papers, 1976-2003 (bulk 1981-1999) 24 Linear Feet — 15,972 Items

Collection consists primarily of newspaper clippings (local, national, and international) pertaining to abortion, the anti-abortion movement, and other women's health issues, kept by staff of the National Women's Health Organization (NWHO) and its regional clinics (WHOs) in Raleigh, N.C.; Columbus, Ga.; Wilmington, Del.; Jackson, Miss.; Fargo, N.D.; Fort Worth, Tex.; Orlando, Fla.; and Milwaukee, Wis. Also contains NWHO legal files, largely pertaining to the NOW (National Organization of Women) v. Scheidler case (1986-2003), and to RICO (the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act), which plaintiffs in the case applied to the anti-abortion movement. Regional WHO clinics were among the plaintiffs for NOW v. Scheidler, and Hill acted as a key witness. The collection also includes a small number of general office/subject files. Arranged into three categories: Clippings, General Office/Subject Files, and Legal Files. The Clippings were received in chronological groupings, and are thus described in more detail than the General Office/Subject Files and Legal Files, which are less organized.

Accessions (2008-0114 and 2009-0110) consist largely of operational and legal files from the NWHO and its regional clinics, including Raleigh, N.C.; Columbus, Ga.; Delaware; Central Florida; Fargo, N.D.; Fort Wayne, Ind.; and Summit (Milwaukee), Wis. Materials include facilities management files; leases and other real estate information; litigation records and lawsuits between NWHO and anti-abortion groups; police and case reports; statutes about abortion procedures; and NWHO board meeting files.

Accession (2010-0019) consists of audiovisual material: 24 VHS tapes plus 2 DVD copies (master and use) of each tape. Contents include news specials relating to NWHO and the abortion debate; also includes testimony footage, interviews, and other NWHO events.

Collection
Women Work! improved women's economic security through job training, education, lobbying policymakers, and partnering with other national organizations. It was originally known as the Displaced Homemakers Network, and operated from 1978 until 2009. Accession (2009-0163) (12,375 items; 16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0163) (16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. CDs and other electronic data files have been removed and transferred to Duke's ERM server. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2015-0112) (0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1975-1990) is an addition that includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, administrative records, correspondance, and copies of the Network News, the publication for the Displaced Homemakers Network.

Collection

Dan Kirsch papers, 1975-2004 19.1 Linear Feet — 10,840 Items

Activist, community organizer, and theater director. Executive director of Charlotte's Lesbian and Gay Community Center. He also founded One Voice, a gay, lesbian and gay-affirmative chorus in Charlotte, NC, and OutCharlotte, an annual cultural festival that celebrated LGBT culture through theater, dance, music, visual art, film and video. Collection documents the activities of Dan Kirsch and his work with various North Carolina gay and lesbian organizations. Organizations represented in the collection include One Voice, the N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride Board, PELAG, Time Out Youth, OutCharlotte, NC Pride, and The Lesbian and Gay Community Center of Charlotte.

Accession (2005-0037) (21 boxes) documents the activities of N.C. gay and lesbian organizations. Includes correspondence, newsletters, programs, flyers, and organizational material from One Voice; organizational material, correspondence, programs, invitations, minutes, registration records, financial records (bulk 1994) from Music & Message, the Gala Choruses Leadership Conference (Sept. 2-4, 1994 in Charlotte); correspondence, newsletters, clippings, financial records (1993-1996), minutes, and administrative records for the N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride Board; fund raising material for the AIDS fund raiser Heart Strings (June 15, 1992), and Pelag benefit Our Family Celebration (Oct. 12, 1991); and files, promotional materials, newsletters, clippings, minutes, and financial records about a N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride event, 1994. Also included are posters, t-shirts, 14 VHS video tapes, 1 CD-Rom, 50 photographs, and 25 slides.

Accession (2007-0079) (1600 items; 3 lin. ft.; dated 1991-2002) contains organization files and correspondence for Time Out Youth, an organization for lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth; financial and organizational files for OutCharlotte (1995-1998); NC Pride files; conference materials; and clippings from local publications including the Charlotte Observer, Creative Loafing, and The Leader. Also included are 2 CD-Rs containing audio clips of interviews, 15 Hi8 video cassettes, 9 VHS tapes, 4 audio cassettes, and photographs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0173) (2500 items; 3.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2004) includes materials from the planning and construction of The Lesbian and Gay Community Center in Charlotte, NC. Also includes The Center program files, administrative materials, board meeting minutes, publicity, and volunteer information.

Collection
Southern Feminist, Inc. was an organization in Athens, GA from 1984-1989 that served as a communications device for women's political activism in the southern states. Their records consist chiefly of administrative files, which includes correspondence, article drafts, and subscription information. Also included is a group of feminist periodicals including Southern Feminist.

The collection includes the records of the periodical The Southern Feminist, which was founded by editor and publisher Sharron Hannon in Athens.The records of Southern Feminist Inc. chiefly consist of sdministrative files, such as correspondence, drafts of articles, subscription files. Printed materials are mostly feminist peridocals and include issues of The Southern Feminist and The Southern Feminist Extra.

Collection
Marianne Lieberman was an abortion rights activist, artist, memoirist, and Holocaust survivor. Her papers document her work with Pro-Choice North Carolina, NARAL Pro-Choice America, her art, and her published works. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection contains documentation of Lieberman's work as a pro-choice activist and artist in North Carolina. This includes correspondence, public messaging, mailing lists, meeting minutes, reports, financial materials and clippings. Printed materials include copies of her memoir Aftershock, the original German edition Nachbeben, and two books featuring her artworks, My Window: Art for Love and Loss, and Timely Revelations. Also included are copies of printed materials featuring her art and graphic design work, including a catalog from the family business B and G Lieberman.

Collection

Jean O'Barr papers, 1974-2011 18.6 Linear Feet — 13,950 Items

Professor and founder of Duke University's Women's Studies program. Materials from the founding and operation of Duke's Women's Studies program, including proposals, reviews, and annual reports. Also includes scrapbooks with photographs and conference materials; correspondence about the Women's Studies program; and publications about O'Barr and the Women's Studies program. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists largely of O'Barr's files and materials from the founding and operation of Duke University's Women's Studies Department. It includes proposals, reviews, and annual reports. Also includes scrapbooks with photographs and conference materials; correspondence about the Women's Studies program; and publications about O'Barr and the Women's Studies program. Also includes reviews of other women's studies programs throughout the United States; pamphlets and projects relating to the Women's Studies Department; materials relating to the founding of SIGNS magazine; student papers discussing gender; published and unpublished articles by O'Barr, including surveys of women at Duke, writings by O'Barr related to her African studies, and articles about women in academia and the workplace; graduate studies by O'Barr relating to Africa and anthropology; book reviews; and other miscellaneous material. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Triangle Community Works records, 1974-2008 5.5 Linear Feet — 4125 Items

Triangle Community Works! was formed in 1994 and consists of a coalition of groups, including ASPYN (A Safer Place Youth Network), The Gay and Lesbian Helpline, P-FLAG (Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays), and RRNGLE (Raleigh Religious Network for Gay and Lesbian Equality). Collection includes historical documents from several groups in Triangle Community Works!, including ASPYN, RRNGLE, and the Gay and Lesbian Helpline. Materials date from the 1970s to 2008.

This collection (Accession 2009-0276) includes historical documents from several groups in Triangle Community Works!, including ASPYN, RRNGLE, and the Gay and Lesbian Helpline. Materials date from the 1970s to 2008 and include news clippings, newsletters, publicity materials, meeting minutes, organizational records, and administrative files.

Collection
Celeste Wesson is a radio producer and Duke University graduate. These papers document her work with the Women's Radio Collective of WDBS, Duke's campus radio station.

Collection consists of materials documenting the work of the WDBS Women's Radio Collective, including meeting minutes, programming and how-to guides, and materials aimed at addressing the needs of women in radio production.

Collection
Nancy Richardson is a feminist, lesbian, anti-racist theologian and ordained minister with the United Church of Christ. Collection includes biographical and personal materials, correspondence, publications, speeches, and other writings. The material highlights her feminist, anti-racist theological and ministerial work, particularly that with the Women's Theological Center in Boston. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection contains biographical material about Nancy Richardson, including her curriculum vitae, ordination materials, the Community Change award that she received in 2012, and memory books devoted to Elaine Huber (Richardson's wife) and Lilac Grove (Huber and Richardson's home). Correspondence largely relates to Richardson's academic appointments, particularly her hiring at Harvard Divinity School. Publications, speeches, and articles by and about Richardson highlight her feminist, anti-racist theological and ministerial work. Many of the articles and speeches are related to Richardson's work with the Women's Theological Center in Boston, Massachusetts. Cutting the Mustard, a book about Richardson's removal from her position at Boston University School of Theology, is also included, as well as reviews of the book.

Collection

Elizabeth Grosz papers, 1973-2016 13.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes

Professional papers of Elizabeth Grosz, professor in the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies Department at Duke University. Materials include her scholarly work, teaching files, and her students' work.

Professional papers of feminist philosopher, Elizabeth (Liz) Grosz: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Grosz. Materials encompass her scholarly work, including research files, manuscripts and typescripts of writings, publications, as well as student work, teaching files including syllabi, lecture notes, etc., and ephemera.

Collection
Online
The Feminist Women's Health Center in Atlanta, Georgia, was founded in 1976 by a group of women dissatisfied with the health care options and information available to them and who desired to change this situation. The clinic started in 1977 with self-help groups where women were able to learn from each other and themselves through open discussions. It expanded to offer a full range of clinical services (including providing access to birth control and contraception, abortion, donor insemination, and pregnancy care) as well as educational, outreach, and advocacy programs, addressing subjects such as sexual hygiene, sex, and sexually transmitted diseases. Collection is comprised of files documenting the development and daily operations of the Feminist Women's Health Center, a feminist non-profit women's healthcare center, from the years 1973-2003. Major components of the collection include files from research studies conducted at the center, policies and procedures for maintaining the center, and incidents of anti-abortion protests at the center, specifically involving the group Operation Rescue. The National Abortion Federation, the professional association of abortion providers in the United States and Canada, also figures prominently throughout these records. The collection is organized into six series: Administrative Files, Clinic Files, Subject Files, Financial Material, Legal Files, and Audiovisual Material. The collection also contains a physically separate Closed Series, comprised of materials from the prior six series that are currently closed to research.

Collection is comprised of files documenting the development and daily operations of the Feminist Women's Health Center (FWHC), a feminist non-profit women's healthcare center, from the years 1974-2003. Major components of the collection include files from research studies conducted at the center, policies and procedures for maintaining the center, and incidents of anti-abortion protests at the center, specifically involving the group Operation Rescue. The National Abortion Federation, the professional association of abortion providers in the United States and Canada, also figures prominently throughout these records. The collection is organized into six series: Administrative Files, Clinic Files, Subject Files, Financial Material, Legal Files, and Audiovisual Material. The collection also contains a physically separated Closed Series.

The Administrative Files Series most clearly documents the day-to-day operations of the FWHC. Materials in this series include policies, procedures, and guidelines for operation of the center; minutes and notes from a range of meetings held by the center; personnel files; and schedules. This series contains four subseries: General Administrative Files, Meetings, Personnel Files, and Schedules.

Materials in the Clinic Files Series include a range of records related to clinical services provided and research studies conducted at the FWHC. This series has been divided into four subseries: Statistics, Laboratory Statistics, Research, and Patient Education Information.

The Subject Files Series includes files maintained by the staff of the FWHC on a range of topics related to women's health issues, events, local information, and other women's health clinics. This series contains two subseries: a General subseries which covers these subjects broadly, and an Anti-Abortion Violence subseries which focuses specifically on anti-abortion protests at the FWHC and other locations, the anti-abortion movement in the United States, and pro-choice efforts to counter this movement.

Items in the Financial Material Series consist of records, reports, and files documenting the financial situation of the FWHC between the years 1982 and 2001. These files detail the intricacies involved in operating a women's health clinic from a financial standpoint.

The Legal Files Series contains files related to legal issues faced by the FWHC, including lawsuits and legislation which would affect women's reproductive health and the clinic.

The Audiovisual Material Series consists of 28 audiocassettes and 11 videocassettes. Audiocassettes are primarily recordings of workshops, conference sessions, and events. Videocassettes are primarily educational. One videocassette documents anti-abortion protesters outside the FWHC.

The Closed Series consists of sensitive materials removed from the previous six series and CLOSED to research.

Collection
Arielle Greenberg is a poet, editor, and assistant professor in the English department at Columbia College, Chicago, Ill. This collection consists of 367 zines dated from 1973 to 1995, likely collected by the donor from 1992-1995. The collection primarily includes personal zines by women (though some are by men) that focus on the riot grrrl scene, feminism, punk music, and progressive political causes. Many of the zines include correspondence from the authors. The collection also includes personal correspondence and correspondence from zine authors between 1987 and 1995, with the bulk dating from 1993 to 1995.

This collection consists of 367 zines dated from 1973 to 1995, likely collected by the donor from 1992-1995. The collection primarily includes personal zines by women (though some are by men) that focus on the riot grrrl scene, feminism, punk music, and progressive political causes. Many of the zines include correspondence from the authors. The collection also includes personal correspondence and correspondence from zine authors between 1987 and 1995, with the bulk dating from 1993 to 1995. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.