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Collection
Autograph manuscript letter with postmarked envelope from the actress and writer Fanny Kemble in London to Miss Patteson in Andover, 10 May, 1889. Kemble thanks Miss Patteson for sending photographs, mentioning that she particularly values one of Bishop Patteson. She says she is "glad Lord Coleridge thought Lenox (Mass.) pretty. It has always seemed to me a charming mountain village." Frances Anne "Fanny" Kemble was a British actress, writer, and abolitionist. She was born into a theater family; her acting career spanned the years 1829-1868. Kemble acted to support herself, but she was most passionate about writing, and was an accomplished playwright, poet, and diarist. She married the Pierce Mease Butler, an American who subsequently inherited his family' plantations. After spending time in Georgia, Kemble became an abolitionist and later divorced her husband. In 1863, Kemble published her anti-slavery memoir, Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839, which is said to have influenced the British against supporting the Confederacy in the Civil War. Kemble's own family was divided on that issue, as her elder daughter sided with her mother, while her younger daughter returned to Georgia with her father. Frances Butler Leigh published Ten Years on a Georgia Plantation Since the War (1883) as a rebuttal to her mother's memoir. Kemble's success as a Shakespearean actress enabled her to buy a cottage in Lenox, Massachusetts. Her correspondent, Miss Patteson, is the daughter of Frances Duke Patteson, a niece of the poet Samuel Coleridge Taylor; the Lord Coleridge mentioned in the letter is John Duke Coleridge (1820-1894), the 2nd Lord Chief Justice of England. Bishop Patteson refers to Miss Patteson's sister, John Patteson (1827-1871), who became an Anglican martyr after being killed doing mission work in the Solomon Islands.

Autograph manuscript letter with postmarked envelope from the actress and writer Fanny Kemble in London to Miss Patteson in Andover, 10 May, 1889. Kemble thanks Miss Patterson for sending photographs, mentioning that she particularly values one of Bishop Patteson. She says she is "glad Lord Coleridge thought Lenox (Mass.) pretty. It has always seemed to me a charming mountain village."

Collection
The Irish historian Alice Stopford Green writes to an unidentified editor or publisher to decline an invitation to write an article on Irish Americans for an upcoming publication.

Green writes to an unidentified male editor or publisher ("Dear Sir"), to decline his invitation to write an article for a forthcoming book. She writes that she is "overwhelmed by work this winter," and that "the subject of the American Irish is almost unknown to me and it would need a considerable time and reading to write anything worthy of your insertion." In conclusion, she writes that she is "keeping in view the idea of getting some work done which may draw attention to your publications." Written on letterhead: 36 Grosvenor Road, Westminster.

Collection
Collection comprises a signed letter (2 leaves; 20 cm x 27 cm) from Artemisia Gentileschi to patron Cassiano Dal Pozzo, written from Naples 1630 August 31. She requests his help in acquiring a license for her assistant, Diego Campanili, to carry arms, and mentions work she is completing for the Empress and a portrait she is painting for Dal Pozzo.
Collection
Collection comprises a 35-page memorandum book maintained by the Haulsey family of London, England, from 1646-1846. The memoranda usually record marriages, births, christenings, deaths, and burials, but there are also separate notes on family genealogy, as well as a few notes on land tenancy transfers, and money lent and received. There is one record regarding numbers of silver trays and candlesticks. Volume entries are handwritten on varying types of paper, and are not in chronological order. The volume also features an embroidered binding and a metal-clasp closure with initials G.W. (one clasp is missing). The embroidery includes images of day and night, as well as a dog, monkey, church, house, windmill, swallow, snail, and various plants and flowers.
Collection

Rebecca West note, 16 August 1931 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item — 12.5 x 16.5

Rebecca West was a British writer and critic. The Rebecca West note consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown correspondent reading, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

The collection consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown recipient which reads, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

Collection
Hannah Hutchinson married Samuel Mather in 1731; the couple settled in Boston, Mass. She died in 1781 (some sources have the death date 1752) and Samuel died in 1779. Collection comprises a request written by Hannah Hutchinson Matter on 3 April 1858 to Edward Hutchinson, asking him to fulfill the pecuniary bequest made to her by his father and to give the sum (4 pounds) to her son, Samuel Mather, Junior. The back of the request contains Samuel's note, dated 3 May 1858, stating that he received the money.

Collection comprises a request written by Hannah Hutchinson Matter on 3 April 1858 to Edward Hutchinson, asking him to fulfill the pecuniary bequest made to her by his father and to give the sum (4 pounds) to her son, Samuel Mather, Junior. The back of the request contains Samuel's note, dated 3 May 1858, stating that he received the money.

Collection
Over 200 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over a third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, her daughters Lucy Saltar and Frances "Fanny" Saltar, and Elizabeth's cousins Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon. Dozens of other letters come from family friends and relatives, male and female, from prominent families in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, New York, and some from the Midwest and New England states. Topics include courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and some discussions of finances. There are a few references to slavery and to enslaved people and servants. Letters sent during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863; one discusses African American troops and their role in the war, and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman. A few earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially in and around Baltimore and Philadelphia. Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The papers consist almost entirely of 266 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over one-third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, the family matriarch, Lucy Saltar, Frances "Fanny" Saltar, Mary Gordon, and Polly Gordon. There are also single letters from other female members of the Saltar family and a handful of letters from men, some of whom were Saltar family members. The letters are organized by correspondent name, ending with a group of letters addressed to unidentified individuals.

The manuscript pages total approximately 765, primarily bifolios, almost all written in ink. There are also four additional manuscripts: an invitation; a sheet of paper with receipts; and a memorandum and bond concerning a land sale. A number of later letters are accompanied by addressed envelopes, some with stamps.

The correspondence is almost entirely comprised of women writing to other women: mothers to daughters; daughters to mothers; and cousins to cousins; and friends to each other. Over half of the collection comprises letters to and from a family matriarch, Elizabeth Gordon Saltar, living at her residence at Magnolia Grove (near Frankford, Pa.), and a large group of letters sent by various correspondents to her daughter Fanny Saltar, who was one of the family's historians. Also present is a large group of correspondence between cousins Elizabeth Gordon Saltar and Mary Gordon, as well as letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's other daughter Lucy Saltar, and letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's cousins, Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon.

Other families who correspond and/or are mentioned often in the letters: Bowne, Brooks, Bunyan, Coleman, Drexel, Hartshorne, Howell, Lardner, McMurtrie, Morgan, Morris, Stillman, Tilghman, Ulstick, Van Dykes, and Wharton. Many of these are prominent families from Pennsylvania or Maryland. One letter from a Bowne in series 7 contains a partial family tree of the Bownes and Saltar families. Most of these letters are found in the Fanny Saltar series.

Among the places from which letters were sent are areas in Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York State, New Jersey, Illinois, Ohio, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Paris (France), and Rome (Italy). Cities represented are Boston, Baltimore, Charleston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, and others. Many letters were sent to or from Magnolia Grove, the Saltar plantation home near Philadelphia.

Topics tend to focus on societal mores and customs of the times as experienced by married and single women of land-owning classes: courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses such as measles, bowel complaints, eye conditions, diphtheria, tumors, and mental illness, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and fairly frequent mentions of finances.

The letters written during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863, as well as a comment on friends going off to war, and one letter discusses African American troops and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman, whom the Saltars knew from Philadelphia. Earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially of events around Baltimore.

Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Eleanor "Elly" Elliott was a women's rights activist, a board member of NOW's Legal Defense and Education Fund, a Barnard College Board Member, served on the National Advisory Council on Women's Educational Programs and was an editor at Vogue magazine. These materials consist of personal papers from the Elliott family and administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities. It also includes photographs, scrapbooks and some audio/visual materials.

These papers consist of personal materials from the Elliott and Thomas families as well as administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities.

The collection includes some material regarding Elly's husband, Jock Elliott, former chairman of the Ogilvy and Mather advertising firm. Included in the Thomas family materials is a series on Eleanor's mother, Dorothy Q. Thomas. In the legal and financial papers series, there are materials pertaining to the divorce and child support matters of Elliott's brother, James A. Thomas Jr.

The collection contains scrapbooks and photographs, as well as reel-to-reel audiotapes that require reformatting before use.

Collection
In the late 18th century, Eleanor Butler (1739-1829) and Sarah Ponsonby (1755-1832), also known as the Ladies of Llangollen, left their lives in the upper tiers of Anglo-Irish society and made a home for themselves in Llangollen, Wales, to the disapproval of both their families. Butler and Ponsonby appeared to have understood their relationship as a marriage, and they were known for dressing alike in masculine clothing. They were part of an emerging culture of 'romantic friendship' between same-sex couples. While they lived a life of rural retreat, the Ladies' relative celebrity and social status meant that their home Plas Newydd became a salon. They hosted the many of the intelligensia of the day, including poets such as Wordsworth and Byron, and the reigning Queen Charlotte. The collection is largely made up of letters by the Ladies, as well as materials about Llangollen, the cultural haven of Plas Newydd, and images of the Ladies in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

The Ladies of Llangollen Collection is made up of materials both by and about Lady Eleanor Butler and Miss Sarah Ponsonby's life at their home, Plas Newydd, in Llangollen, Wales.

The largest part of the collection is the letters written by and to the Ladies. Most of the correspondence takes place between Sarah Ponsonby and her cousin Mrs. Sarah Tighe, along with letters from Eleanor Butler, their neighbor Ch. L. West, and the Fownes family, Sarah Ponsonby's cousins and former guardians. The manuscripts include poems by the Ladies, as well as an account written about the Ladies of Llangollen by Ch. L. West and an album by a visitor to Llangollen. The papers contain items and images of the Ladies of Llangollen, Llangollen Vale, and the traditions of Wales in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Guidebooks, maps, and printed materials make up the materials about the history of the Ladies' beloved Llangollen. The images of the Ladies and their home in Llangollen Vale make up the largest part of the image files.

Collection

Chevalier d'Eon papers, 1778-1779 1.0 Linear Foot — 8 items

Charles Geneviève Louis Auguste André Timothée d'Eon de Beaumont, known as Chevalier d'Eon, was a French diplomat, spy, freemason and soldier who fought in the Seven Years' War. Collection comprises a dossier of seven items (approximately 75 pages) compiled by Chevalier d'Eon articulating his wish to forsake his female persona in order to fight in the American Revolutionary War.

Collection comprises a dossier of seven items (approximately 75 pages) compiled by Chevalier d'Eon articulating his wish to forsake his female persona in order to fight in the American Revolutionary War. The seven items are wrapped in a blue paste-paper wrapper. The first item is a collection of 35 commissions and supporting documents from diplomats, military officers and French, Russian or English ministers, testifying to Eon's qualities and his activity in the secret services for 20 years, including the peace mission to the court of Russia (1755-1756); a mission to Vienna carrying the campaign plan of the Russian army and revelation of a secret Russian-Prussian correspondence, along with another mission to Russia (1757); commission as secretary of the French embassy at the court of Russia, after having contributed to the success of four treaties (1757-1759); commission as aide-de-camp of maréchal de Broglie in Germany (1760-1762); secretary of the French Embassy in Great Britain, for the conclusion of peace (1762); resident, then Minister Plenipotentiary in London (1763); refusal of proposals to communicate particulars and papers relative to the peace to the opponents of the court of St. James (1764-1765); followed by a Franco-British plan for the Mexican and Peruvian uprisings against Spain (1766-1768) for the Spanish ambassador in London; against the accusations of venality and corruption by the Court of France by the Princess of Wales and the English ministers (1769-1770); secret correspondence with Louis XV, the Prince de Conti, the Comte de Broglie, all ending in a promise of a life annuity from Louis XV.

The second item is a brief Memoire by d'Eon, dated 20 May 1778, for the Count of Vergennes, Minister for Foreign Affairs, in order to obtain payment of his pension, with a copy of 5 supporting documents. The third item is a memorandum describing the Chevalier's affairs in England, as of August 1778, including rents due on a house in Brewer Street/Golden Square, which is scheduled to be demolished. There are further details of d'Eon's state of affairs in France, where the Chevalier blames his feminine state and sedentariness as cause of a very painful rheumatism. D'Eon accordingly begs the King and his ministers to allow him to don men's clothes and fight.

Items four through seven are signed letters. One to M. de Miromesnil, Garde des Sceaux, Versailles 12 February 1779, with a copy of his petition to the King's special adviser, the Comte de Maurepas, of the 8th of February, asking support for the Chevalier's request to serve as a volunteer in the Comte d'Orvilliers' fleet. The other two letters are written to the Comtesse de Maurepas, Versailles 12 February 1779, with a copy of the Chevalier's petition to the comte, 8 February, requesting the comte's protection.

Collection
Eleanor King, possibly of Liverpool, England. Commonplace book, 13 pages; 31 cm x 19 cm, dated 1781-1784, kept by Eleanor King. The book contains poems--some original, others attributed--interspersed with cooking and medicinal recipes. King typically signs her name and gives the dates with each entry. Recipes range from "Raison Wine," to "Sherif Cake," to her "Elixer of Health." One poem, possibly written by King, is devoted to the pleasures of breastfeeding and is titled: "On Seeing a Lady Nursing her own Child." The commonplace book once included several other pages which were cut away from the book at an early date.

Commonplace book, 13 pages; 31 cm x 19 cm, dated 1781-1784, kept by Eleanor King. The book contains poems--some original, others attributed--interspersed with cooking and medicinal recipes. King typically signs her name and gives the dates with each entry. Recipes range from "Raison Wine," to "Sherif Cake," to her "Elixer of Health." One poem, possibly written by King, is devoted to the pleasures of breastfeeding and is titled: "On Seeing a Lady Nursing her own Child." The commonplace book once included several other pages which were cut away from the book at an early date.

Collection
Abigail Buttons was the daughter of Desire Clark. Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever.

Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever and asks for "... prayers for me that God would inable me to behave my self in Christian manner in whatsoever he calls me to meet with." She requests a visit from her mother and her brother, John.

Collection

Georgette A. Chamberlin papers, 1785-1917 10 Linear Feet — 12 Items

Georgette A. Chamberlin (1831-1920) was daughter of Mehitable Varnum and Franklin Tenney, who was proprietor of the National Hotel in Washington, D.C, where she resided. Four travel diaries, a genealogical album, four photograph albums, two scrapbooks, and a postcard album; all except one photograph album maintained by Georgette A. Chamberlin.

Four travel diaries, a genealogical album, four photograph albums, two scrapbooks, and a postcard album; all except one photograph album maintained by Georgette A. Chamberlin. The diaries document her trips to New England (1877), the Southern States (1881 and 1886) and to Europe (1880, 1882, and 1897). The genealogical album includes material about the Varnum and Tenney families, Franklin Tenney (her father) and the National Hotel. During her travels to Germany (1897) she stayed and traveled with Princess Salm-Salm (Agnes Elizabeth Winona Leclercq) an American adventures, and widow of Prussian nobleman, Prince Felix Salm-Salm. The photograph albums and the scrapbooks document her family history, and the history of and visitors to the National Hotel. The postcard album contains postcards of her travel in Europe, with a few from the United States.

Collection

Summons, 1785 May 31 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

New York County's Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery was the court of criminal jurisdiction, especially for crimes punishable by life imprisonment or death. Collection comprises a manuscript summons from the Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery in New York City dated 1785 May 31 for Doctor Charles M. McKnight, James J. Beekman, Sarah Conolly (Conoly), and Ann McClean (McClain) to serve as witnesses the following day against the African American prisoner Hannah, who was indicted for "Murder of a Bastard Child."

Collection comprises a manuscript summons from the Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery in New York City dated 1785 May 31 for Doctor Charles M. McKnight, James J. Beekman, Sarah Conolly (Conoly), and Ann McClean (McClain) to serve as witnesses the following day against the African American prisoner Hannah, who was indicted for "Murder of a Bastard Child."

Collection
Cornelia Ann Ludlow Willink (1788-1866) used these notebooks as a young girl in New York studying penmanship, mathematics, and geography. The math workbook (dated 1796) is hardback bound, with arithmetic lessons on numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and measurements. The five copybooks (dated approximately 1800-1802) are bound in marbled paper, with school assignments and lessons on penmanship, geography and history about the United States and Canada, repeatedly copied sentences about manners, morals, and character, and other assorted assignments. Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin, and was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of a mathematics manuscript workbook and five manuscript copybooks used by Cornelia Ann Ludlow as a young girl between the ages of approximately eight and fourteen years old (dating between 1796 and 1802). The math workbook (dated 1796) is hardback bound, with arithmetic lessons on numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and measurements. The five copybooks (dated approximately 1800-1802) are bound in marbled paper, with school assignments and lessons on penmanship, geography and history about the United States and Canada, repeatedly copied sentences about manners, morals, and character, and other assorted assignments.

Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

Collection
Collection comprises a full-color, four-page manuscript metamorphosis book, with verses and pen-and-watercolor illustrations by Elizabeth Winspear, who was possibly a resident of New England. Each page features two flaps that fold out in stages to reveal new illustrations. Characters include Adam and Eve, along with a lion, griffin, and eagle, and themes include the attainment of wealth, and impact of sickness and death. Includes a clamshell box.
Collection
Thomas Smith was a resident of the burrough of Norfolk, Va. Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

Collection
Collection contains assorted examples of ephemeral manuscripts and printed materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin relating to women's education, largely dating from the 19th and early 20th century. Formats include: school catalogs and prospectuses (for both New England and Parisian institutes for young women); school certificates and merit awards; tuition receipts and other financial ephemera; some images of school buildings; student workbooks, penmanship books, and other classroom exercises; examples of correspondence between female students and their family or friends; and other assorted items including a journal kept by student Sophia Jane Griffith and a student list maintained by penmanship instructor J. P. Webster.
Collection
Laura "Tibbie" Roberts is a life-long activist for women's rights and has been repeatedly honored for her community service and volunteering in North Carolina and abroad. The collection consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0084) (3.6 lin. ft.; 2700 items; dated 1970s-2000s) consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Items of note include her materials from the North Carolina Council of Churches, the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing (1995), North Carolina Council for Women, the National Women's Conference in Houston (1978), and the United Methodist Church's United Methodist Women Southeast Jurisdiction. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0150) (0.6 lin. ft.; 200 items; dated 1970s-1995) consists largely of scrapbooks from Roberts' conferences in the 1990s, including her trips to China, Singapore, and Malaysia as part of the Fourth Annual World Conference on Women, the NGO Forum on Women, and the World Methodist Conference, and her trip to Israel as part of an excavation course. Also included are materials from a filmstrip promoting the Equal Rights Amendment.

Accession (2010-0131) (0.1 lin. ft.; 25 items; dated 1979-1997 and undated) comprises material primarily related to support for the Equal Rigths Amendment. Includes printed material, newspaper clippings, 15 color photographs, and an ERA necklace medalion.

Accession (2011-0108 and 2011-0123)(0.2 lin. ft.; 8 items; dated 1811-2011 and undated) includes a family deed regarding land in Craven County; a letter; printed items on women and religion, one of which is annotated by the donor; and a piece of ephemera with a quote from the ERA on the front and a Bible verse on the back.

Collection
Madame de Staël (1766-1817) was a French literary figure whose writings were highly influential in late 18th and early 19th century Europe. She was a political polemicist whose famous confrontation with Napoléon Bonaparte led to her exile from Paris until the Bourbon Restoration. This letter was written in 1814 towards the end of her life. She writes from Paris to the prominent New York mercantile firm LeRoy, Bayard & McEvers concerning a financial transaction in the amount of $20,000. She states that she has transferred the sum to McEvers in London, and wishes to confirm that they will, in turn, transfer it to her account with another firm. At the time she wrote this letter, Madame de Staël owned a large tract of land in upstate New York. Her father originally purchased the land in the event that the family wanted to escape France's instability and settle in America. Although she and her children never moved to the United States, de Staël both increased her land holdings and invested in developing her property. LeRoy, Bayard & McEvers represented Europeans purchasing property in New York State, so it's highly likely that the $20,000 was used to either increase or develop Madame de Staël's American land holdings. This letter is evidence of a degree of financial and business independence that was highly unusual for a woman at the time.

Collection consists of a single one page autograph manuscript letter from Madame de Staël to the firm LeRoy, Bayard & McEvers in New York City regarding a financial transaction of $20,000. The letter is dated 1814 October 12; a note on the back states that it was received in New York 1815 March 10. In the letter, de Staël writes that she is sending their partner in London, Mr. McEvers, a note for $20,000. She asks if they have received her letter of July 25 in which she asked them to transfer the $20,000 to her account with the firm Doxat & Divett, and reiterates this request in the event that they have not received it. The letter is signed Necker de Staël Holstein. At the time, Madame de Staël owned an estimated 30,000 acres of land in what is now upstate New York, (Sakolski) and it's likely that this transaction was related to her American property holdings. Madame de Staël's father purchased land in America for his daughter and her children with the thought of leaving unstable France and settling in America. Although she never lived there, de Staël increased her American land holdings and reportedly invested $20,000 in developing the property. -- Sakolski, The Great American Land Bubble (1932)