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Collection
The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the African-American community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a racically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the AfricanAmerican community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a radically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

Collection

Carrie F. Young papers, 1872-1894 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 21 items

Carrie F. Young was one of the first advocates of women's suffrage in California, and was an activist for other political causes. Young eventually became a physician, the first woman to receive a medical diploma in California, from the Oakland College of Medicine in 1884. Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials.

Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials. There is a letter regarding political matters and a typescript page of general instructions for an unnamed convention, both written by Young's son, Robert E. Bush; a recommendation for Young's work on national campaigns as a Republican poltical activist and speaker, dated 1889; two advertisements for a Mrs. Dr. Tarbell's treatments of "nervous diseases and female complaints;" two pages of guidelines for a populist club; one of Young's calling cards; and an enclosure for the California Medical Journal. There is also a brochure for "photographic fern-leaf mottoes." In addition, there are 8 flyers, handbills, and broadsides, all advertising political speeches (especially for the People's Party), lectures, or medical work by Young, except for two that advertise speeches by Mrs. M. S. Singer of Chicago, and Dr. J. V. C. Smith. Collection also includes issues of the serials Life Crystals (March 1882, no. 3), edited by Young, and Pacific Journal of Health (January-September 1872, nos. 1-9), published by Young.

Collection

Beth York papers, 1968-2015 9.0 Linear Feet

Musician and academic music therapist. Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985. Also includes materials documenting academic career including research, teaching, publishing, and grant administration.

Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985.

Accession 2018-0113 consists of materials documenting York's academic career as a music therapist, including her M.A. thesis, university evaluations and a tenure portfolio, teaching materials, research materials, conference materials, presentations, correspondence, workshop materials, a performance piece called Finding Voice, grant materials, and music therapy workshop materials.

York also co-edited a number of issues of the lesbian feminist quarterly Sinister Wisdom, which are included in the collection, as are production materials, drafts, and correspondence related to those issues. Also included are issues of the women's periodicals Hotwire and Paid My Dues.

Collection

Lisa Unger Baskin collection of materials about Anzia Yezierska, 1987-1988, 1987-1988 0.5 Linear Feet — Guide to the Lisa Unger Baskin collection of materials about Anzia Yezierska, 1987-1988

Anzia Yezierska (1880-1970) was a Polish-American author. Collection consists of materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin about the publication of "Anzia Yezierska: A Writer's Life," a biography by Yezierska's daughter, Louise Levitas Henriksen, published in 1988. Materials include drafts of a New York Times book review by Helen Yglesias. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Galley proof, unbound book manuscript, dust jacket, and materials regarding the publication of Anzia Yezierska: A Writer's Life, written by Louise Levitas Henriksen and Jo Ann Boydston in 1988. Includes a typescript draft with manuscript corrections of a review of the book by Helen Yglesias, later published in the New York Times.

Collection
Helen Yglesias (1915-2008) was an American novelist. Collection comprises photocopies of research material, along with an edited and final manuscript related to Yglesias' book, ISABEL BISHOP.

Collection comprises photocopies of research material, along with an edited and final manuscript related to Yglesias' book, ISABEL BISHOP, published by Rizzoli, 1989, New York.

Collection

Louisa Wright needlework sample book, 1888 0.8 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a volume entitled "Needlework," containing 16 pages of illustrations for sewing and darning patterns and techniques, accompanied by 22 finished samples. The title page indicates the work was done by Louisa Wright during a "Second Year" at an unnamed institute or training facility. There are illustrations for hemming and seaming, stitching, sewing on a tape, gathering, setting-in, making a buttonhole, herring-boning, darning a thin place, tacking, making a gusset, making a calico patch, darning a hole, whipping, using a print patch, crosscut darning, Swiss darning and grafting, and stocking-web darning. The volume has a sewn cover in khaki cloth featuring two pink ribbon closures with bows, buttons, and thread button-loops. The title "Needlework" is emboidered in pink thread.
Collection

Workers' Defense League records, 1940-1949 0.2 Linear Feet — 38 items

The Workers' Defense League was an American socialist organization devoted to promoting labor rights. Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization.

Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers' Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization. The main case was that of Odell Waller, a Virginia sharecropper sentenced to death in 1940 for killing his white landlord. Arguing that the landlord had cheated Waller and that he had in any case acted in self-defense, the WDL raised money for Waller's defense, lobbied for the commutation of his sentence, and mounted a nationwide publicity campaign on his behalf. The effort was unsuccessful, and Waller was executed on July 2, 1942. Other cases included Alton Levey, Rosario Chirillo, and Tee Davis; the organization worked in support of federal regulation to repeal poll taxes. Items include brochures on the Waller case, luncheon and dinner invitations, a tear sheet for an advertisement, action alerts, flyer announcing a contest and a mass meeting in New York, and contribution forms with mailing envelopes.

Also includes a fundraising mailer (1946 May 16) related to Tee Davis and sent by Lillian Smith, the author of the novel STRANGE FRUIT. Tee Davis was an African American from Arkansas who was sentenced to ten years in prison for assault with intent to kill. His crime was firing a shotgun towards the bottom of the front door to his home while an intruder tried to break in. The intruder was a white sheriff looking for thieves.

Collection

Virginia Woolf's oak writing desk, between 1904-1907 2.5 Linear Feet — 67.4 x 126 x 87.7 cm; 26.5 x 49.5 x 34.5 inches

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath. Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath.Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Collection
Virginia Woolf was an English writer and publisher, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection

Sarah Wood Zine collection, 1990s 2 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Sarah Wood was the co-owner of GERLL Press, a zine distro based in Chicago, Ill., in the early to mid-1990s. The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of about 150 zines self-published by women and girls, largely in the United States. Many of these zines come directly from the GERLL Press inventory, or were submitted to Wood and Curry by their authors to be considered for sale through the distro. Subjects include feminism, the riot grrrl movement, body image and consciousness, women's health, women athletes, sexual abuse, television and film, poetry and short stories, rock music and punk music, violence against women, sexual identity, homosexuality, and bisexuality. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Womonwrites records, 1979-2014 3.0 Linear Feet — 1875 Items

Womonwrites is an annual conference of lesbian writers. Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, meeting evaluations, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

RESTRICTIONS: Membership mailings lists, in Box 3, are CLOSED until 2020.

Collection
Women Work! improved women's economic security through job training, education, lobbying policymakers, and partnering with other national organizations. It was originally known as the Displaced Homemakers Network, and operated from 1978 until 2009. Accession (2009-0163) (12,375 items; 16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0163) (16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. CDs and other electronic data files have been removed and transferred to Duke's ERM server. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2015-0112) (0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1975-1990) is an addition that includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, administrative records, correspondance, and copies of the Network News, the publication for the Displaced Homemakers Network.

Collection
Materials documenting the Women's Worship Circle activities including correspondence, invitations, programs, handouts, liturgies, member reflections, photographs, planning and meeting notes and agendas.

The Women's Worship Circle records document the creation and operation of the organization, in which members engaged with and performed feminist theology through the development of their own worship services. The records consist of correspondence, liturgies, programs, meeting notes, handouts, members' reflections, photographs and invitations.

Collection
The Women's Theological Center, founded in 1981 and active through 2007, was a Boston-based organization that provided feminist theological and ministerial education for women. Collection consists of administrative records documenting the foundation and development of the WTC, as well as board meeting and other committee notes. Also included are grant applications and funding requests, publicity and programming materials (especially related to the Study/Action program), and writings and publications. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of administrative records documenting the foundation and development of the WTC, as well as board meeting and other committee notes from Francine Cardman and Gay Harter. Budgets, membership information, and reports are also in the administrative records. Collection also includes grant applications and funding requests, publicity and programming materials, and writings and publications. The publicity and programming materials document the WTC's activities and include articles, brochures, and event programs, as well as information, readings, and other materials from the Study/Action program. Most of the Study/Action material is from Gay Harter's files. Writings and publications include WTC newsletters, drafts of an unpublished book about the Study/Action program, and other writings by WTC members.

WTC members who appear frequently in the administrative records, particularly meeting minutes, as well as Study/Action materials and WTC newsletters include Donna Bivens, Nancy Richardson, Marian (Meck) Groot, Angelica (Gay) Harter, Francine Cardman, and Joan Martin.

Collection
Collection comprises a poster that promotes the organization's "aims to make knowledge about women's bodies and health available to women," and to "develop policy about women's health with women." Important issues illustrated include affordable health care, stopping the spread of AIDS, and a woman's right to choose contraception. There is also contact information.
Collection
Online
Non-profit, inter-racial organization founded in Durham, N.C. in September 1968; Elna Spaulding was founder and first president. Collection comprises correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, as well as information about the organization's relationship to the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C. Documents the organization's involvement in the Durham community on a variety of issues, including easing racial tensions; smoothing the way for court ordered school integration in 1970; providing for the recreational and cultural needs of disadvantaged youth; and establishing a clearinghouse to offer information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of social problems.

The records of Women-In-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc. (WIAPVC), an interracial community service non-profit organization based in Durham, North Carolina, span the years 1968 to 1998. Materials document the organization's history beginning with its foundation in 1968, and include correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, clippings, photographs, a scrapbook, awards, and other documentation of its activities and milestones. The records contain information about the organization's various projects and workshops, and its relationship with the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C., Inc. Persons associated with the organization included business, political, and community leaders and activists, among them Ann Atwater, Mrs. William A. Clement, Mrs. James E. Davis, Dr. Juanita Kreps, Mrs. H.M. Michaux, Mrs. Kenneth C. Royall, Margaret Rose Sanford, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, and Mrs. Albert Whiting. There are also letters of support from Senators B. Everett Jordan and Sam Erwin.

The bulk of the early items in the Correspondence Series, dating from 1968 to 1969, reflects the tenacity and persistence on the part of Spaulding, the first president, in seeking money for the organization's activities. She sought funding from national and North Carolina foundations and local businesses. Among the contributors were the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Grant Foundation, and the City of Durham. Money was also raised by dues paid by its members, which became a point of controversy for the organization.

The Administrative Files include agendas and minutes for WIAPVC's general, board, executive, and advisory committees. Agendas and programs for general meetings indicate that the leaders in the organization attempted to maintain a balance between focusing on some aspect of the group itself (such as its by-laws and self-evaluation) and programs of community-wide importance. The advisory committee evolved from the steering committee and was made up of subcommittee chairs.

Folders in the Subcommittees Series generally contain correspondence, reports, and guidelines. Records show that the number of subcommittees waxed and waned depending on the need for them. Subcommittees for which records exist include Civic Improvement, Education, Human Relations, and Police-Community Relations. The subcommittees undertook outreach and programs that were significant to Durham's community.

The organization's outreach activities are also documented in the Conferences, Workshops, and Projects series. Conferences and workshops sponsored by the organization reflect the group's efforts to improve itself, support other organizations, and reach out to provide service to the community. In the same series, WIAPVC projects indicate the wide range of interests and responsibilities which the organization sought to undertake. Among those represented in the files are the Center for School Support; the Clearinghouse, which offered information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of concerns; Cornwallis Housing Project, which helped provide recreational needs for youth residing in the project; the Cultural Experience Pilot Project, which allowed for 37 Durham junior high school students from low income families to spend three days in Washington; the Durham Emergency Energy Committee, which helped provide fuel to needy families in the Durham community; and various intern projects, in which students from the Duke Divinity School Field Education Program participated.

The bulk of the processed collection consists of the early records of the WIAPVC. Later years (1980s-1990s) are represented in Accession 1996-0164 and Accession 2008-0104, which include financial activities, projects, administrative files, reports, event planning information, newsletters, and awards ceremonies.

Collection
Collection comprises a four-page embroidery examination completed in ink by Mrs. Fred Kennedy in Norfolk, Nebraska, including 6 stitch samples. The exam did not provide the questions, and has been annotated by the person who graded it, who also attached four typed comments to the stitch samples. Includes original mailing envelope.
Collection
During her career in women's public policy, Leslie R. Wolfe served as both the director of the Women's Educational Equity Act Program (WEEAP), and as the longtime director of the Center for Women Policy Studies. This collection documents her professional life and contains materials generated by her work with WEEAP, her speeches, women's health policy materials focusing on HIV/AIDS and human trafficking, and publications from the Center for Women Policy Studies.

The collection consists of materials documenting Leslie R. Wolfe's career in women's public policy, particularly her work as the director of the Women's Educational Equity Act Program from 1979-1987. These include lobbying materials, publications, speeches, grant administration, and correspondence. The collection also contains materials documenting Wolfe's work on women's health care policy from her time with the Center for Women Policy Studies, with an emphasis on HIV/AIDS and human trafficking. These materials include publications, conference proceedings, research reports, and correspondence.

Collection
Collection comprises a full-color, four-page manuscript metamorphosis book, with verses and pen-and-watercolor illustrations by Elizabeth Winspear, who was possibly a resident of New England. Each page features two flaps that fold out in stages to reveal new illustrations. Characters include Adam and Eve, along with a lion, griffin, and eagle, and themes include the attainment of wealth, and impact of sickness and death. Includes a clamshell box.
Collection
Delouis Wilson is an African American artist, and jewelry designer, and art collector, based in Durham, North Carolina. The papers comprise her journals (1977-2008); calendars; sketchbooks, art school notebooks, and loose pieces of mixed media artwork. The journals, currently closed to use, document in detail her personal life, travels in the U.S. and abroad, including time spent in Tunisia in the Peace Corps, life in Durham, N.C., and employment as a jewelry designer. The collection also includes 30 large photographic studio portraits of African Americans, almost all hand-tinted crayon enlargements, dating from about 1890 to 1945 and collected by Wilson chiefly in the Southern U.S. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts, the Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The papers of Delouis Wilson, an artist and jewelry designer based in North Carolina, consist of a set of 27 journals (1977-2008, currently closed); a few calendar notebooks; sketchbooks and notebooks from her time at Atlanta College of Art; and loose pieces of artwork. An important component of Wilson's archive consists of a collection of 30 large photographic portraits of African Americans dating from the late 1880s to about 1940, collected by Wilson chiefly in the American South.

Wilson's journals (closed to use by donor request), calendars, and notebooks document in detail the personal life of the artist, life in Durham, N.C., her travels abroad and in the U.S., including time in Tunisia in the Peace Corps, and her career as a jewelry designer. They include small illustrations contain as well as laid-in items such as letters and postcards; some have handmade covers constructed of textiles and other non-paper materials.

The artwork, sketchbooks, and art notebooks present a mix of drawings, sketches, prints, textile work, and mixed-media color paintings created by Wilson during and shortly after her art school years, all 8x11 inches or less. The notebooks also include art school class notes and handouts, creative writings, and personal notes such as recipes, lists, housing notes, and addresses. There are self-portraits scattered throughout, including a larger piece from 1990 laid into a sketchbook. Also in the collection is one large color photograph of an African American woman by Wilson. The artworks range in size from 4 1/2 x 6 to 16x20 inches.

A central component of the collection are thirty historic studio portraits of individual Black men and women (1890s-1940s), with some of couples and families, collected by Wilson in thrift shops and flea markets throughout the Southern U.S. Most belong to a process called crayon enlargements. The studios developed faint enlargements of the photographic images on convex pieces of thick card stock, then outlined and filled them with ink, crayon, or pastel pigments to resemble a painting. Only one portrait in the collection is a true fully developed gelatin silver photograph. A few smaller portraits are sized approximately 10x8 to 13x9 inches; the majority are quite large, ranging from 19x13 to to 20x16 inches. Most of the prints are hand-tinted with a variety of tecniques, but some are black-and-white, and some are on flat rather than convex mounts. Due to their fragile condition, the portraits are currently unavailable until Conservation treatment and rehousing is completed.

Collection
Cornelia Ann Ludlow Willink (1788-1866) used these notebooks as a young girl in New York studying penmanship, mathematics, and geography. The math workbook (dated 1796) is hardback bound, with arithmetic lessons on numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and measurements. The five copybooks (dated approximately 1800-1802) are bound in marbled paper, with school assignments and lessons on penmanship, geography and history about the United States and Canada, repeatedly copied sentences about manners, morals, and character, and other assorted assignments. Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin, and was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of a mathematics manuscript workbook and five manuscript copybooks used by Cornelia Ann Ludlow as a young girl between the ages of approximately eight and fourteen years old (dating between 1796 and 1802). The math workbook (dated 1796) is hardback bound, with arithmetic lessons on numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and measurements. The five copybooks (dated approximately 1800-1802) are bound in marbled paper, with school assignments and lessons on penmanship, geography and history about the United States and Canada, repeatedly copied sentences about manners, morals, and character, and other assorted assignments.

Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

Collection
Helen Maria Williams was a British novelist, poet, and translator of French-language works. Collection comprises four letters written by Helen Maria Williams, two to her nephew, Athanase Laurent Charles Coquerel, one to Mrs. Joel [Ruth] Barlow, and one to an unidentified recipient.

Collection comprises four letters written by Helen Maria Williams, two to her nephew, Athanase Laurent Charles Coquerel, one to Mrs. Joel [Ruth] Barlow, and one to an unidentified recipient. Williams provided aid for fellow republican radicals. On 22 August 1798, she wrote to her American expatriate friend Ruth Barlow. Williams hoped that Ruth's husband, the diplomat Joel Barlow, would assist James Wollstonecraft (Mary's brother), who was then in prison in Paris as a suspected spy. The letter notes Thomas Payne's [Paine's] ineffective efforts on James' behalf. Other topics in the letters include Coquerel's position, her income, the health and situation of friends and family members, and an unnamed woman she wishes to avoid. Three letters are accompanied by partial or full transcription.

Collection

Lady Wilde letter, 1852 November 19 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Collection comprises a letter from Lady Wilde discussing the loss of her mother, followed by her marriage, and announcing the birth of her eldest son, William Charles Kingsbury Wilde. She also comments on marriage, "a woman's duty ends with marriage. She becomes a vegetable, a house leek, a mop--I feel that I am 'potted' for the rest of my days...." Includes an enclosure with a note written in another hand identifying Wilde along with the letter's recipient, whose last name may be Grant.
Collection
Single page testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman describing her husband's physical abuse and his neglect of his children.

Single-page handwritten manuscript testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman on the topic of her husband's physical abuse of her and his neglect of their children. Text reads: "Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed." Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Susan Wicklund papers, 1970-2013 8 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Dr. Susan Wicklund is a former abortion provider from Wisconsin. The papers chiefly document her professional career, centering on her work in the Midwest, where she operated abortion clinics in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and Wisconsin from the 1990s to 2013. Materials include many items of correspondence from patients, supporters, and opponents; files on national and local abortion rights and women's movement groups; articles and newspaper clippings; conference papers; materials related to anti-abortion groups; legal documents, including court case records; a recording of her 1992 "60 Minutes" television interview, and drafts of her book, This Common Secret: My Journey as an Abortion Doctor (2007). A few clinic documents also exist in the form of leasing records, sample charts, manuals, and anonymized guestbooks. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Susan Wicklund papers include personal correspondence and professional papers regarding her work as an abortion provider in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. Materials relate mostly to her work at Mountain Country Women's Clinic in Livingston, Montana in the 1990s, and include newspaper clippings, letters of support, patient reviews, donations, and administrative documents relating to the clinic in the form of sample charts, manuals, and anonymized guestbooks.

Materials relating to Wicklund's 1992 television interview on the "60 Minutes" program include a VHS tape of the interview, clippings, and many letters of support as well as hate mail.

The collection also contains materials related to anti-abortion groups and their harassment of Wicklund; these records also include legal documents referring to a related court case.

Also present in the collection are materials about various women's health organizations, support groups, conferences, and other clinics and centers, including Planned Parenthood, National Women's Organization, and the National Abortion Rights Action League. Drafts of Wicklund's book, This Common Secret: My Journey as an Abortion Doctor (2007) are also in this collection.

Collection
Collection comprises Edith Wharton's corrected Italian manuscript (34 typed pages) for her short story, "La Duchessa in Preghiera" (The Duchess at Prayer), originally published in English in Scribner's Magazine, August 1900, then by Scribner's in the collection of her stories, "Crucial Instances," 1901. The corrections are in Italian and are in Wharton's own hand.
Collection

Rebecca West note, 16 August 1931 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item — 12.5 x 16.5

Rebecca West was a British writer and critic. The Rebecca West note consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown correspondent reading, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

The collection consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown recipient which reads, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

Collection
Celeste Wesson is a radio producer and Duke University graduate. These papers document her work with the Women's Radio Collective of WDBS, Duke's campus radio station.

Collection consists of materials documenting the work of the WDBS Women's Radio Collective, including meeting minutes, programming and how-to guides, and materials aimed at addressing the needs of women in radio production.

Collection

Anna Lora Weiss Account Books, 1896-1910 0.2 Linear Feet — 2 Items

Anna Lora Weiss, born circa 1858, lived in Boston's Dorchester section and owned several rental properties throughout the city. She was also a member of several voluntary and charitable associations, including the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and the Commitee on Music for the School Committee of Boston. Her family, including her mother Mary Clapp Weiss, brothers Richard and Carl, and sister Mary, were of German descent. Collection contains two account books, dated 1896-1904 and 1905-1910 respectively, kept by Anna Lora Weiss of Boston, Mass. The account books meticulously document Weiss's income, including significant income she received from her rental properties and other investments, as well as her expenditures on travel, household goods, gifts, and charitable contributions. In addition, the account books indicate that Weiss loaned money at interest to her brother Carl for his often unsuccessful business endeavors. In addition to her finances, the account books also document Weiss's daily activities and social and political interests. Together, the account books reveal that Weiss was an active, independent, and astute businesswoman. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection contains two account books, dated 1896-1904 and 1905-1910 respectively, kept by Anna Lora Weiss of Boston, Mass. The account books meticulously document Weiss's income, including significant income she received from her rental properties and other investments, as well as her expenditures on travel, household goods, gifts, and charitable contributions. In addition, the account books indicate that Weiss loaned money at interest to her brother Carl for his often unsuccessful business endeavors. In addition to her finances, the account books also document Weiss's daily activities and social and political interests. Together, the account books reveal that Weiss was an active, independent, and astute businesswoman.

Collection
Diane Weddington worked as a journalist and religion editor at the Contra Costa Times in the 1980s-1990s. She has also taught courses in journalism, public policy, new media, and ethics. Collection includes Weddington's published articles, research clippings, reporter notes, and other publications and materials from her journalism career, divinity school studies, background material for arts journalism, and materials documenting Weddington's educational and teaching careers. Topics represented include the gay and lesbian community in San Francisco, the ordination of women and gay clergy, the women's rights movement, domestic violence and child abuse, Alzheimer's Disease, and other miscellaneous subjects.

The collection includes a variety of materials, ranging from Weddington's published articles to clippings of other articles used in her research. The coverage of the homosexual community in and around San Francisco is represented in two series; the first being Coverage of Gay Clergy in the Church. This series includes legal proceedings by the Lutheran Church against gay clergy, as well as Weddington's own reporter notebooks from her time covering the subject. A second series, Coverage of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Communities, includes materials from Weddington's involvement in the National Lesbian and Gay Journalist Association and the Frameline film festival. Also included in this series are coverage of the blackballing of gay and lesbian news by the Contra Costa Times, business directories from San Francisco, local gay pride events, and mainstream coverage of gays and lesbians in America.

The series on Weddington's Research, Clippings, and Reporting from Various Projects includes materials from her religion beat at the Contra Costa Times, as well as other internal correspondence and clippings from her work at the newspaper. Subjects include general women's news, as well as articles on domestic violence and rape, child abuse, Satanism, recovered memory phenomena, and women's rights. Also included in this series are materials from Weddington's many projects, including the War Tax Resistance campaign, Diablo Valley study groups and clubs, Journalists Exchange on Aging, and gardening. Finally, this series includes materials from Weddington's coverage of the visit of Pope John Paul II to San Francisco in 1987.

Women in the Church includes materials from Weddington's own involvement in the women's ordination movement in the Episcopal Church, as well as her clippings of coverage regarding women and religion during the 1970s-1980s. Also related and included in this series are Weddington's materials from her time as a student at the Divinity School at Duke University in the 1970s.

Weddington's Published Articles and Reporter's Notes appear to date largely from 1986-1992, although many articles and most of her notes are undated. These clippings from the Contra Costa Times along with news wires reveal the breadth of Weddington's journalism, with topics ranging from the religion section to breaking news about traffic accidents. The materials are not sorted or arranged in any way. Along with clippings and reporter's notebook pages, the series also includes some correspondence from readers, internal Contra Costa Times photography requests, press releases, and other miscellaneous pages used by Weddington in her work.

Finally, the Correspondence series includes both electronic (print-outs) and postal correspondence. One part of the series consists of dot matrix printer printouts of internal communications between the staff and management of the Contra Costa Times. Weddington writes that this material documents the bias against gays and lesbians, as well as the regular workflow of the newspaper in terms of scheduling reporters, meeting deadlines, internal gossip, and so on. Another portion of the series contains letters, greeting cards, and other personal and professional correspondence. These have been arranged by year but not sorted further.

Accession (2014-0169) contains materials documenting Weddington's education and teaching careers, personal and professional correspondence, as well as materials relating to her work as a reporter, material related to her book on Alzheimer's disease, and work on the arts for the National Parks Service.

Included are materials from her grade school studies, undergraduate career at Duke University, work at Duke Divinity School, journalism coursework at the University of Missouri, and graduate studies at Berkeley in journalism and law. Teaching materials include courses taught at Contra Costa Community college on journalism and ethics. She has also taught couses on media and public policy. Also included are clippings and extensive research materials from her arts journalism in California, including work done for the Contra Costa Times.

Collection

Mary Margaret Wade papers, 1966-2007 9.4 Linear Feet — 6555 Items

Artist, writer, and arts educator. Collection contains personal correspondence, photographs, writings and drawings, subject files, ephemera, and clippings. The photographs document Wade's personal life, her art exhibits, and trips to Cuba, Alaska, and Costa Rica. The drawings and writings primarily consist of published versions and drafts of cartoons, as well as some manuscripts of writings and drawings for texts, including the artwork for Have You Ever Seen an Ugly Bride?, an unpublished book by Wade and Elizabeth Lide. The subject files include a file for the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South, an abortion rights petition signed by Norma McCorvey, and typescripts documenting the Kilbuck family, who were ancestors of Wade's that were missionaries in Alaska. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection contains personal correspondence, photographs, writings and drawings, subject files, ephemera, and clippings. The photographs document Wade's personal life, her art exhibits, and trips to Cuba, Alaska, and Costa Rica. The drawings and writings primarily consist of published versions and drafts of cartoons, as well as some manuscripts of writings and drawings for texts, including the artwork for Have You Ever Seen an Ugly Bride?, an unpublished book by Wade and Elizabeth Lide. The subject files include a file for the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South, an abortion rights petition signed by Norma McCorvey, and typescripts documenting the Kilbuck family, who were ancestors of Wade's and Moravian missionaries in Alaska in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Veteran Feminists of America records, 1971-2017 31.4 Linear Feet — 30.4 lin. ft.

Online
Veteran Feminists of America (VFA) is a nonprofit organization for veterans of the Second Wave of the feminist movement. It was founded by Jacqueline Ceballos and held its first feminist reunion in 1993. The organization continues to operate today, sponsoring reunions, programs, and publications honoring feminists throughout the United States. The accession (2008-0286) includes administrative files, program and reunion materials, obituaries, correspondence, financial information, newsletters, periodicals, and photographs relating to the activities and programs of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs, floppy disks, and CDs, some of which have been withdrawn for electronic preservation. There are also medals and other ephemera. The addition (2008-0254) consists of DVDs of VFA events and interviews. Addition (2009-0131) includes administrative files, events files, and other organizational information. Addition (2010-0097) includes program information and other organizational files, predominately from VFA's conference, The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders, held in Dallas in March 2010. Addition (2010-0128) includes honoree information forms and materials from the Dallas conference. Addition (2012-0083) includes a program from the Tribute to Helen Reddy event (2006) and two copies of an associated commerically-available music compact disc by Sandy Rapp; along with the souvenir program from the VFA salute to feminist lawyers (2009). Addition (2017-0058) includes conference programs from several conferences that took place in the early 2000's and 2010's. The addition also includes meeting minutes from the annual VFA board meeting. Addition (2017-0139) includes administrative files and planning materials for different events that documented the history of VFA and the Second Wave Feminist Movement; along with a history of VFA (2013). Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection (2008-0286) includes administrative files, program and reunion materials, obituaries, correspondence, financial information, newsletters, periodicals, and photographs relating to the activities and programs of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs, floppy disks, and CDs, some of which have been withdrawn for electronic preservation. There are also medals and other ephemera. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The addition (2008-0254) (64 items; 1.2 lin. ft.) consists of DVDs of VFA events and interviews.

The addition (2009-0131) (900 items; 1.8 lin. ft., dated 2001-2008) consists of board minutes, administrative materials, program files, some correspondence, and publicity. Program files include reunions, special presentations, conferences on feminist history and issues, and other educational and commemorative events. In particular, the accession includes materials from the Salute to Feminist Lawyers event put on in June 2008 at the Harvard Club in New York.

The addition (2010-0097) (300 items; 0.6 lin. ft., dated 2005-2010) includes miscellaneous newsletters, dated 2005-2008; board meeting minutes from 2007; event and program files from a 2009 Pompano Beach, FL awards gala and a Dallas conference entitled The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders, held March 2010. The Dallas event files include copies of materials on 22 honorees, as well as the program text and other promotional materials. Other topics in this accession include website initiatives and the Feminists Who Changed America book launch.

The addition (2010-0128) (150 items; 0.6 lin. ft., dated 2009-2010) includes materials submitted by honorees at the "The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders" conference held by the VFA in Dallas. Materials include information forms, resumes, essays, and other miscellaneous biographies.

The addition (2012-0083) (4 items; 0.1 lin. ft., dated 2006, 2009) includes a program from the Tribute to Helen Reddy event (2006) and two copies of an associated commerically-available music compact disc by Sandy Rapp; along with the souvenir program from the VFA salute to feminist lawyers (2009).

The addition (2015-0069) (1800 items; 3.0 lin. ft., dated 2011-2014) consists of event information, program and administrative files relating to the activities of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs of event programming, including the Kate Millett festival (2012), and Labor and the Women's Movement (2014).

The addition (2017-0058) (.2 lin. ft., dated 2002-2017) consists of program and administrative files related to the operation of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media includes two DVDs; one is of the Harvard Club Luncheon (2014) and the other is of the Veteran Feminist Association South Florida Luncheon (2009).

The addition (2017-0139) (.2 lin. ft., dated 2007-2017 consists of administrative and program files related to the activities of the Veteran Feminists of America.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Lenora Greenbaum Ucko papers, 1966-2013 7 Linear Feet — 4220 Items

Professor of anthropology, sociology, and social work, who founded StoriesWork, a non-profit organization in Durham, N.C. that advocates Therapeutic Storytelling, or the use of folk story analysis for empowering abused women. Collection consists of several separate accessions and includes Ucko's travel diaries; teaching and course materials; transcripts of Ucko's publications, including her book, Endangered Spouses; correspondence; Russian genalogy; materials from the Henry Zvi Ucko Memorial Exhibit, "What We Brought with Us," which featured personal items taken by German Jews who fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s; and other materials from Ucko's position at the Museum of the Jewish Family in the late 1990s. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2006-0015) consists primarily of files, lectures, and papers for classes taught by Ucko; files pertaining to cross-cultural communications prepared for the U.S. Army JFK Special Warfare Center; 20 labeled color slides; and travel diaries from Sierra Leone, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Egypt, Senegal, Pakistan, and Holland.

Addition (2007-0015) (750 items, 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 1973-1994) contains typescripts and promotional material for articles and books including Endangered Spouses; course materials including files, papers, and class rosters; correspondence; and one audiocassette. Also included are materials from a study of Russian genealogy by students at Aldephi University directed by Ucko.

Addition (2007-0066) (200 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1996-1998) contains slides, photographs, oral histories on audiocassettes, 1 VHS videocassettes, printed and other materials all concerning a 1996 exhibit Lenora Ucko curated in honor of her late husband, Henry Zvi Ucko. The exhibit was entitled "What We Brought with Us", an exhibit about the personal items taken by German Jews who fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s. The exhibit was first at Duke University and then moved to the NC Museum of History in Raleigh.

Addition (2011-0063) (900 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2002) largely consists of materials from Ucko's involvement in the Museum of the Jewish Family. Museum materials include programming pamphlets and advertising, exhibitions, budget materials, grant applications, Board of Directors correspondence and meeting minutes, newsletters, mission and by-laws, and other materials from the operation of the organization, primarily dated 1997-1998. Other items in this addition include some of Ucko's correspondence, her research on museums and memory, and some StoriesWork materials.

Addition (2013-0052) (75 items; .1 lin. ft.; dated 1975, 1981-1982, 2004, 2006, 2008-2009, 2013) includes a research paper and notes on Israeli absorption centers as well as newsletters and pamphlets for StoriesWork. Other items in this addition include pamphlets and flyers advertising Ucko's research consulting business, a program for a 1975 production of All in the Family at the University of Maryland Munich campus (Ucko served as faculty advisor), and a 2013 resume.

The Lenora Greenbaum Ucko Papers were acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Liberia to America poem, 1849 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Martin Farquhar Tupper was an English writer and poet. Collection comprises Martin Farquhar Tupper's manuscript poem in four verses, "Liberia to America." Signed, with location Albury, England [crossed out], Surrey. Tupper was among the first to support the new country; he exhorts Americans to support their "sable" brothers and to recognize the state officially, "with gracious glance befriend Thine own sons, no longer slaves!" The poem is undated, but probably dates around 1849, with the United States' formal recognition of Liberia.

Collection comprises Martin Farquhar Tupper's manuscript poem in four verses, "Liberia to America." Signed, with location Albury, England [crossed out], Surrey. Tupper was among the first to support the new country; he exhorts Americans to support their "sable" brothers and to recognize the state officially, "with gracious glance befriend Thine own sons, no longer slaves!" The poem is undated, but probably dates around 1849, with the United States' formal recognition of Liberia.

Collection

Mary B. Tuckey poems, 1845-1846 0.4 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a volume containing nine handwritten poems prepared by Mary B. Tuckey and others for the 1845 anti-slavery fair held in Boston, Massachusetts, but brought together in a presentation volume. The volume features hand-painted covers and two illustrations, and was presented to Maria Weston Chapman, editor of the Boston Liberty Bell, by Mary Mannix, secretary of the female anti-slavery society in Cork, Ireland, in 1846. The volume was enclosed in a case with a leather spine, with initials "M.M. to M.W.C" and dated "Cork, 1846." One of the poems commemorates Frederick Douglass' visit to Cork.
Collection
Raging Grannies is an activist organization that promotes peace, justice and social and economic equality by raising consciousness through song and satire. They also aim to challenge stereotypical assumptions about advocacy and aging. This collection contains materials documenting the Triangle chapter of the Raging Grannies in North Carolina from 1998-2015.

The Triangle Raging Grannies records consist of photographs, newspaper clippings, protest song lyrics, member lists, flyers and other paraphernalia related to the activities of the organization around the Triangle area of North Carolina.

Collection

Triangle Community Works records, 1974-2008 5.5 Linear Feet — 4125 Items

Triangle Community Works! was formed in 1994 and consists of a coalition of groups, including ASPYN (A Safer Place Youth Network), The Gay and Lesbian Helpline, P-FLAG (Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays), and RRNGLE (Raleigh Religious Network for Gay and Lesbian Equality). Collection includes historical documents from several groups in Triangle Community Works!, including ASPYN, RRNGLE, and the Gay and Lesbian Helpline. Materials date from the 1970s to 2008.

This collection (Accession 2009-0276) includes historical documents from several groups in Triangle Community Works!, including ASPYN, RRNGLE, and the Gay and Lesbian Helpline. Materials date from the 1970s to 2008 and include news clippings, newsletters, publicity materials, meeting minutes, organizational records, and administrative files.

Collection
According to the Triangle Business and Professional Guild bylaws, the TBPG aims to establish a network of business and professional resources, to encourage fellowship and support among businesses, professionals, and charitable pursuits, and to provide and promote positive role models in the gay and lesbian community, particularly in the Triangle (Raleigh, Chapel Hill, and Durham) area of North Carolina. This organization was founded in the early 1990s and is based in Raleigh. Accession (2008-0168) (900 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1970-2006) includes TBPG newsletters from 1993-2006, news clippings highlighting the lesbian and gay communities, and some administrative material. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2008-0168) (900 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1970-2006) includes TBPG newsletters from 1993-2006, news clippings highlighting the lesbian and gay communities, and some administrative material. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Dame Sybil Thorndike was a distinguished British actress best known for her work on stage. In this letter to the actress and playwright Elizabeth Robins, Thorndike thanks her for the gift of some heather from Yorkshire. She also sends her regards and thanks to "Lady Bell" for her support. The letter is addressed to Robins at Rounton Grange, the North Yorkshire estate which was the family home of the writer Florence Bell ("Lady Bell"). Bell and Robins were close friends and collaborators. Thorndike refers to a play; at the time of this letter, she was in rehearsals for the 1922-23 London production of Shelley's The Cenci at the New Theater, directed by her husband, Lewis Casson. This letter connecting three key female figures of the London stage is evidence of the strong support network these women formed in a male-dominated arena.

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter from Sybil Thorndike to Elizabeth Robins at Rounton Grange, Northallerton in North Yorkshire. In the letter, Thorndike thanks Robins for sending her a piece of heather from Rounton Grange. Thorndike writes, "I am sure it is going to bring us luck, and I love having something from Rounton on my dressing table. How lovely to think of you up there among the peacocks and the glorious moors! I really think the play is going to be a success." The letter is signed "yours affectionately, Sybil" with a manuscript postscript asking Robins to give her love to Lady Bell, and to thank Lady Bell for her support. The letter is composed on Thorndike's own letterhead stationery, "Miss Sybil Thorndike" at the address of the New Theater, London and listing her husband, Lewis Casson, as Director. The play in production Thorndike refers to is Shelley's The Cenci, in which she played the lead, Beatrice. With stamped, postmarked envelope.

Collection

Third Wave Foundation records, 1992-2011 3.5 Linear Feet — 2600 Items

Feminist activist organization that works nationally to support young women and transgender youth. Collection includes administrative files, fundraising materials, grant partner information, photographs, clippings, and conference materials. Also includes restricted electronic information. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes some administrative files, grant materials, research, fundraising, and conference files from the duration of Third Wave's existence, with the majority of files dating 1997-2006. Also includes photographs and clippings collected by Third Wave documenting various events and activities. Some materials are restricted, including board meeting minutes, electronic records, and audiovisual tapes. Please contact Research Services before visiting the library to use this collection.

Collection acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Third Side Press records, 1991-2003 13.2 Linear Feet — 8775 items

Third Side Press, a feminist publisher of women's health and lesbian fiction books, was founded in 1991 and ceased active publication in 1998. It was dissolved as a corporation in 2003. During the years of active publication, Third Side Press produced between 20 and 25 titles, mostly in paperback, including top sellers such as CANCER AS A WOMEN'S ISSUE and THE WOMAN-CENTERED ECONOMY. Midge Stocker is the founder and publisher of Third Side Press. Materials include correspondence, financial records, book proofs and files, book reviews, and other records relating to the operation of Third Side Press publishing house. Also includes copies of several Third Side Press publications. Floppy disks and other electronic materials have been removed for preservation. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Materials include correspondence, financial records, book proofs and files, book reviews, and other records relating to the operation of Third Side Press publishing house. Also includes copies of several Third Side Press publications. Floppy disks and other electronic materials have been removed for preservation. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Dame Ellen Terry, considered the leading Shakespearean actor of her time, was a member of the company at London's Lyceum Theatre from 1878-1902. Collection comprises an autograph note on Lyceum Theatre letterhead (5"x8"). The actor Ellen Terry writes to "Olga" to schedule a social engagement. She writes, "I'm much grieved to hear of you mother ..." and sends "best remembrances" to Olga's husband. There is also an undated cabinet photograph, by Window & Grove photographers, London.

Collection comprises an autograph note on Lyceum Theatre letterhead (5"x8"). The actor Ellen Terry writes to "Olga" to schedule a social engagement. She writes, "I'm much grieved to hear of you mother ..." and sends "best remembrances" to Olga's husband. There is also an undated cabinet photograph, by Window & Grove photographers, London.

Collection

Meredith Tax papers, 1956-2016 125 Linear Feet — 213 boxes

Meredith Tax is a feminist writer and organizer who has been active since the 1960s. This large collection of her papers includes many files of records documenting her activism in feminism and her role in founding feminist organizations; drafts and manuscripts of her writings, music, and art; personal and professional correspondence; research materials; and subject files. Organizations well represented include Bread and Roses; Women's WORLD; CARASA (Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse); PEN American Center Women's Committee; and the International PEN Women's Writers Committee, as well as many other materials on other organizations. There are also 89 audio cassettes and a few VHS tapes and optical media containing Tax's research interviews as well as interviews with Tax. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

The Meredith Tax papers include materials from the activist organizations she was involved with, as well as drafts and manuscripts of her written work, some personal correspondence, teaching materials, and audio/visual materials.

The largest group of materials at over 130 boxes documents Tax's long career as an activist, beginning with her involvement in Boston's Bread and Roses, a socialist-feminist collective through her continued work with Women's WORLD, a global free speech network Tax cofounded in 1994 to fight gender-based censorship. Other organizations Tax was involved in are also well documented in the collection, including CARASA (Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse); PEN American Center Women's Committee; and International PEN Women's Writers Committee. Smaller amounts of material come from Tax's work with the October League, Chicago Women's Liberation Union, National Writers' Union, and the West Side Community School, as well as other organizations. These materials include committee and board materials, events files, conferences, and many files of organizational notes and records.

Tax's work as a writer, including books, both fiction and nonfiction, articles, essays, and speeches as well as songs, is represented in the Writings, Speeches, and Songs series. The Correspondence series includes both personal and professional correspondence. The Subject Files were created by Tax for research related to her activism and her writing.

Finally, there are 89 audiocassettes, 53 of which contain Tax's research interviews and 36 of which contain interviews with Tax, readings by Tax and board meetings. Other interviews are on several VHS videocassettes and optical discs.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection
Sally Tatnall is a self-described radical feminist and community and political activist from Cleveland Heights, Ohio. Her work centers on lesbian rights, feminism, women's spirituality, reproductive health, anti-racism, and back-to-the-land projects. The collection includes personal materials such as journals, correspondence and photographs, as well as documentation of Tatnall's activism, and printed materials including 1970s sex education pamphlets.

The collection consists of journals, correspondence, meeting minutes, clippings, workshop materials, conference materials, research, and printed materials. Materials document lesbian feminist activism in Cleveland, Ohio, including marches, demonstrations, a feminist Land Project, Restore Cleveland Hope, an art project based on Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party, and the Radical Thought Conference. Printed materials include What She Wants: Cleveland's Monthly Feminist and Lesbian newspaper, 1970s sex education pamphlets, and a group of zines made by high school students in response to Tatnall's work.

Collection
Studio Girl Cosmetics Records include promotional materials related to the multi-level marketing and direct sales cosmetics company. Collection includes leaflets and a pamphlet with beauty tips as well as sales team recruitment materials. Also contains an LP record with the voice of company Chairman Harry Taylor.

The Studio Girl Cosmetics Records include promotional materials related to the Glendale, California-based multi-level marketing and direct sales cosmetics company. This one-folder collection includes two promotional leaflets with beauty tips for customers: “Your Studio Girl Way to Loveliness,” and “Studio Girl: Hollywood Coiffure Blend Hair Fashions of Permalon.” There is also one pamphlet for potential Studio Girl sales representatives called “From a Man’s Point of View.” Other items are recruitment materials including a sales team member application, identification cards, stamped paper bags for products, and branded mailing envelopes. Also contains a plasticized LP record with the voice of company Chairman Harry Taylor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture.

Collection
Strong Women Organizing Outrageous Projects (SWOOP) was a non-profit organization in Raleigh, NC that performed community service projects to help people and organizations in need of home repair and landscaping. The collection includes a series of photo albums and binders documenting SWOOP projects, as well as administrative materials. The binders include correspondence with partner organizations and SWOOP members as well as newsletters and notices about upcoming projects. Board meeting minutes, organizational efforts in the wake of Hurricane Fran, and publicity materials are also included in the collection.

The collection consists of a group of albums and binders that document SWOOP's projects, and a series of materials that document the group's organizational history. The albums contain photographs that document project work days, as well as descriptions of the projects and their locations. The binders contain correspondence with partner organizations and other relevant parties, information about ongoing projects, as well as newsletters and notices about upcoming events and projects. The administrative files comprise mostly board meeting materials, as well as newspaper clippings and publicity.

Collection
Harriet Elisabeth Beecher Stowe (1811 June 14-1896 July 1) was an American abolitionist and author. Collection comprises an introduction and a letter written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, along with a carte de visite of her. There is an undated introduction she wrote for the second edition of Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Stowe's statement appears as an introduction in some copies of the 1853 edition. In the introduction, Stowe discusses the African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, remarking on her mental energy and revelatory powers as a Christian, and attests to Truth's character. She then mentions that the sales of the work will "secure a home for [Truth in] her old age ..." There is an undated letter Stowe wrote from Northampton Depot on Aug. 10 to Mr. Ward, informing him that although she is disposed to support his request, she is under pressures that limit her use of the pen. The carte de visite features a textured surface, and was created by the Howell studio in New York.

Collection comprises an introduction and a letter written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, along with a carte de visite of her. There is an undated introduction she wrote for the second edition of Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Stowe's statement appears as an introduction in some copies of the 1853 edition. In the introduction, Stowe discusses the African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, remarking on her mental energy and revelatory powers as a Christian, and attests to Truth's character. She then mentions that the sales of the work will "secure a home for [Truth in] her old age ..." There is an undated letter Stowe wrote from Northampton Depot on Aug. 10 to Mr. Ward, informing him that although she is disposed to support his request, she is under pressures that limit her use of the pen. The carte de visite features a textured surface, and was created by the Howell studio in New York.

Collection

Stone Circles records, 1995-2012 11.4 Linear Feet — 19 boxes

The Stone Circles records contain materials documenting the history of the organization. These include press clippings, board meeting minutes. staff and financial information, program files, newsletters, event information, and correspondence.

Established in 1995, Stone Circles is a leading organization in the national movement toward a more spiritually-based form of activism. SC has introduced thousands of social change leaders and organizations to spiritual and reflective practice through workshops, retreats, trainings and strategic convenings. Stone Circles at the Stone House is located in Mebane, NC on 70 acres of farmland.

Collection
Collection comprises a letter Stokes wrote to dramatist Benjamin Butler Davenport regarding her plan to attend his play "The Silent Assertion" with her husband. Includes enclosure.
Collection
Amelia Stinson-Wesley is an ordained Methodist minister and advocate for pastoral care of women and abuse survivors in North Carolina. Her papers consist of correspondence, academic writing, periodical excerpts, pamphlets, flyers, and handouts.

Amelia Stinson-Wesley is an ordained Methodist minister and advocate for pastoral care of women and abuse survivors. Her papers consist of correspondence, academic writing, periodical excerpts, pamphlets, flyers, and handouts.