Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Names Samuelson, Paul A. (Paul Anthony), 1915-2009 Remove constraint Names: Samuelson, Paul A. (Paul Anthony), 1915-2009

Search Results

collection icon
Anita Arrow Summers is an economist and Professor Emerita at the University of Pennsylvania. Summers also worked as Head of the Urban Section of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia's Research Department. This collection consists of select files from her professional activities and from her family.

The Anita Arrow Summers papers document her career as an economist. The collection provides a sample of her professional activities, particularly her research on urban economics, education and economics, and the local economy in Philadelphia.

The collection also documents Summers's familial ties to other prominent economists such as her husband Robert Summers, her brother Kenneth J. Arrow, and her brother-in-law (via Robert) Paul A. Samuelson.

collection icon
Edward H. Chamberlin (1899-1967) was an economist and professor at Harvard University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, and items of a personal nature.

The Edward H. Chamberlin papers document his career as an economist and professor. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on topics such as monopolistic competition, market structure, pricing behavior, economies of scale, and collective bargaining, among others. The collection also documents his correspondence with prominent economists and individuals such as Marice Allais, Luigi Einaudi, Dwight Eisenhower, Howard S. Ellis, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Gottfried Haberler, Frank Hahn, Roy Harrod, Friedrich A. Hayek, Richard Kahn, Nicholas Kaldor, Frank Knight, Emil Lederer, Wassily Leontief, Abba Lerner, Gertrud Lovasy, Fritz Machlup, Hans Neisser, J. F. Normano, Francois Perroux, Dennis H. Robertson, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, Thomas Schelling, Robert Schuman, Joseph Schumpeter, Ben Seligman, George Stigler, Frank Taussig, Gerhard Tintner, Jaroslav Vanek, Jacob Viner, and many others.

Along with his scholarship and writings, the collection documents Chamberlin's roles in the American Economic Association, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Council of Economic Advisers, and the Rockefeller Foundation project to aid refugee scholars fleeing Europe during the 1930s; his editorship of the Quarterly Journal of Economics; his speaking engagements; expert testimony in legal proceedings and before houses of the United States Congress; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Harvard. The collection also contains personal artifacts documenting Chamberlin's service in the National Guard during World War 1, his service as a member of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War 2, as well as awards and honorary degrees.

collection icon

Edwin Burmeister papers, 1960-2008 14.4 Linear Feet — 10,800 Items

Professor of Economics at Duke University. Collection contains teaching materials, research files, writings, correspondence with other economists, papers and presentations, and personal files chiefly related to Burmeister's work as a professor of economics at Duke University, the University of Virginia, and the University of Pennsylvania. Many collection materials document Burmeister's research on Capital Theory, Economic Growth Theory, and Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT).

Collection contains teaching materials; research files; writings; correspondence with other economists, including Paul Samuelson; papers and presentations; and personal files chiefly related to Burmeister's work as a professor of economics at Duke University, the University of Virginia, and the University of Pennsylvania. Many collection materials document Burmeister's research on Capital Theory, Economic Growth Theory, and Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT).

collection icon

E. Roy Weintraub papers, 1930-2019 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — 1.1 Gigabytes

E. Roy Weintraub (b.1943) is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Duke University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings.

The E. Roy Weintraub Papers document his career as a historian of economics and mathematics, and professor at Duke University. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the history of economics, role in the community of history of economics scholars, and as a faculty member and administrator at Duke.

The collection also documents his communications with prominent economists as research subjects such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, and Lionel McKenzie. Included in Weintraub's communications are exchanges with prominent figures in the history of economics and related communities of scholars such as Roger Backhouse, Bradley Bateman, Anthony Brewer, Arjo Klamer, Mary Morgan, Deirdre McCloskey, and Philip Mirowski.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Weintraub's roles at in the History of Economics Society, at Duke University, and as an editor of History of Political Economy.

collection icon
Franco Modigliani was an economist, Nobel Prize winner, and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Collection contains correspondence, extensive research notes, unpublished writings, lectures and presentations, teaching materials, published materials, photographs, audiovisual materials, scrapbooks, and clippings that documents the career of a noted economist and Nobel Prize winner, from his earliest student work in Italy through his 40-year tenure of teaching and research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The many annotations written by Modigliani's wife and collaborator, Serena Modigliani, found throughout the collection, provide further information contextualizing the materials.

The Franco Modigliani Papers span the years 1936 to 2005, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1970s to 2003. Through correspondence, extensive research notes, unpublished writings, lectures and presentations, teaching materials, published materials, photographs, audiovisual materials, scrapbooks, and clippings, the papers document the career of a noted economist and Nobel Prize winner, from his earliest student work in Italy through his 40-year tenure of teaching and research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The most current items are a DVD recording of his memorial held at MIT in 2003, and a thesis by an Italian graduate student on Modigliani's macroeconomic views on the Italian and European economy, of the same year. The many annotations written by Modigliani's wife and collaborator, Serena Modigliani, found throughout the collection, provide further information contextualizing the materials. The collection is organized into the following series: Correspondence; Writings and Speeches; Teaching Materials; Professional Service; Engagements; Printed Materials; Personal Files; Audio and Visual Materials; and Electronic Formats. Oversize materials are described at the end of the collection guide.

Researchers will find ample documentation in the collection on Modigliani's work on the life-cycle hypothesis of savings, leading to the Nobel Prize in 1985. Other materials represent his work on topics and issues such as monetary policies, both domestic and foreign; pension trusts; public debt; econometric modelling; international finance and the international payment system; the effects of and cures for inflation; stabilization policies in open economies; and various fields of finance such as savings and investment, credit rationing, mortgages, the term structure of interest rates, and the valuation of speculative assets. Extensive documentation can also be found in the collection on Modigliani's key participation in the design of a large-scale model of the U.S. economy, called the MPS (an abbreviation deriving from collaborators MIT, Pennsylvania State University, and Social Science Research Council), sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank, a model used by the U.S. government until the 1990s. Other documents reveal Modigliani's analyses of the forces of economics and politics in the United States as well as in Italy and the European Union as a whole. His views on various social issues, including the arms race, are found throughout the papers, especially in the many editorials and commentaries he wrote for newspapers and other publications. The materials in this collection reveal the high value that Modigliani placed on collaboration with other economists and with graduate students, with whom he exchanged letters, notes, and drafts of writings and commentary. Researchers examining the correspondence and writings will find the comments, replies, and writings of his many colleagues on the same range of topics. Significant correspondents or collaborators documented in the collection include European and American economists such as Albert Ando, with whom he collaborated on the MPS model, Mario Baldassarri, John Bossons, Jacques Drèze, Merton Miller, Paul Samuelson and James Tobin. Many other major economists of the twentieth century, as well as many political and academic individuals, are represented in smaller amounts of writings and correspondence.

In addition to illuminating Modigliani's distinguished academic career and his collaborative approach to teaching and research, the materials in this collection offer insights into how he contributed significantly throughout his life to European and United States economic growth and reform, through professional service as an analyst, advisor, and expert witness. Organizations that benefited from this work include the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Reserve Bank, the U.S. Congress, and the Treasury Department. Other organizations with whom Modigliani participated and corresponded and are represented in many series in the collection are the offices of the International Economic Association, the American Economic Review, the National Science Foundation, and the National Academy of Sciences.

The Correspondence Series, second largest in the collection, spans all of Modigliani's career, and consists chiefly of professional exchanges initiated by his colleagues in the U.S. and in many other countries. Many of the exchanges are in Italian, though most are in English. Numerous correspondents requested that Modigliani review their writings, and in most cases a draft of their manuscripts can be found in the folder, often accompanied by Modigliani's comments. The correspondence also contains more routine exchanges concerning student advising, academic committees, and activities related to Modigliani's non-academic service. There is very little personal or family correspondence in the collection, though there are some exchanges between Franco Modigliani and his son Andr, sociologist at the University of Michigan, and with his granddaughter Leah, a financial analyst with Morgan Dean Stanley Witter, with whom Modigliani collaborated on a formula for measuring stock risks.

The largest in the collection, the Writings and Speeches Series is subdivided into several subseries, the most extensive of which, the Research and Writings Subseries, contains a wealth of notes, data, subject files, and writings that underpinned and informed nearly all of Modigliani's most significant published works. These extensive files document the evolution of Modigliani's thought on a wide range of economic, social, and political topics, and the amount of materials in this series contributed by his colleagues serves to underscore Modigliani's collaborative approach to research and writing. As much as a third of the material is in Italian. Many of Modigliani's speeches and lectures given around the world, including his Nobel lecture on the life-cycle hypothesis of saving in 1985, can be found in the Speeches and Lectures Subseries. The Non-Academic Writings Subseries contains other writings by Modigliani directed chiefly at a popular audience, in the form of newspaper articles and editorials; while the Writings by Others Subseries houses individual writings, in both manuscript and published form, by Modigliani's colleagues that were not part of the Research and Writings files.

Modigliani spent the greater part of his professional life serving in a number of roles that helped shape the national economic policies in Europe, particularly in Italy, and the United States. The Professional Service Series documents Modigliani's work for various U.S. agencies and organizations. It includes materials from his work under the Federal Reserve Board (FRB), from about 1964 to 1983; these files include agendas, minutes, notes, correspondence, papers, and statistical output relating to FRB meetings and MPS Economic Model. Other files house information relating to his frequent Congressional testimony; his work with the International Economics Association during the seventies and eighties, including conference papers and programs, minutes from executive committee meetings, nominating committee reports, and correspondence; and his other periods of collaboration with the Central Bank, the National Academy of Sciences, the office of the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, and others. Materials on Modigliani's lengthy service to Italian and other European governments can be found primarily in the Research and Writings Subseries of the Writings and Speeches Series and the Correspondence Series.

The papers in the Teaching Materials Series document Modigliani's career as a professor of economics through lecture notes, syllabi, and some student papers, all filed in the Modigliani as Teacher Subseries. Materials derive chiefly from his tenure at the Massachussetts Institute of Technology, although there are some materials from earlier appointments. There are some materials, chiefly class notes, from Modigliani's own student days in the United States in the Modigliani as Student Subseries.

The Personal Files Series is one of the smallest in the collection. It contains materials pertaining to Modigliani's life in Italy and his forced emigration to the United States in 1939, diplomas and honorary degrees, and a number of folders containing biographical information and articles honoring Modigliani's life and work.

Spanning several decades of internationally-recognized work and the awarding of a Nobel prize in 1985, the materials in the Engagements Series, though routine in nature, document the extent to which Modigliani spoke to academics and the ordinary public about issues in economics, via lectures, conferences, and interviews. Files in the Commitments Subseries include routine correspondence, travel arrangements and itineraries, and some writings related to the lecture or speech. The small Calendars Subseries contains appointment books and calendars dating from 1971 to 2003.

In addition to manuscript materials, the collection holds a great number of published writings. These are chiefly housed in the Printed Materials Series and take the form of reports, journals, books, and many reprints of articles. Most of the materials are written by Modigliani, but there are substantial numbers of publications by others in this series. Almost all of the few dozen bound publications originally found in the collection have been cataloged separately for the Duke online catalog and will be housed in the rare books and Perkins Library stacks. They can be accessed by searching the online catalog; a note in the record indicates their original link with these papers. Although nearly all of Modigliani's article-length published works are represented in this series, including early articles from the 1930s, some titles may not be present.

The Audio and Visual Materials Series serves as a repository for photographs, videocassettes, audiocassettes, microfilms, and a few CD-ROMs, which contain interviews, lectures, and speeches given by Modigliani, with a few including contributions by his colleagues. One CD-Rom contains the proceedings from a posthumous conference held in 2005 in remembrance of Modigliani. Family scrapbooks preserved on microfilm are made up of clippings, programs, and other memorabilia related to significant events in Modigliani's career. Use copies may need to be made of some items. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this collection.

Digital formats in the collection are grouped under the Electronic Formats Series (RESTRICTED), which contains correspondence, course materials, data, and drafts of writings and speeches. The contents of the disks have been migrated to the Special Collections server. A disk directory is available for use. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this series.

collection icon

John S. Chipman papers, 1948-2014 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 11 boxes

Collection consists of writings, research, correspondence, and professional files collected or created by John Chipman over the course of his career as an economist and professor at the University of Minnesota. Areas of research include welfare economics, international trade, econometrics, and translations of the writings of Pareto.

Chipman's papers consist of drafts, publications, lecture notes, correspondence, and other files documenting his scholarship, writings, and teachings at the University of Minnesota. Prominent themes include international trade, with extensive research on West Germany during the Cold War; linear programming; welfare economics; econometrics; the writings and impact of Vilfredo Pareto; and Chipman's collaboration and friendships with other economists.

The range of Chipman's research and writings are represented in the Writings Series, where files are arranged alphabetically by title. Files typically include drafts and published versions, usually offprints, as well as occasional correspondence and notes by Chipman documenting the development of the paper or essay.

The Name Files series includes a range of material (including correspondence, writings, notes, and subject files), arranged alphabetically by name, that document his professional relationships and communications with publishers, professional organizations, or other scholars, as well as his ongoing collaboration with other economists, including Leonid Hurwicz, James C. Moore, Tjalling Koopmans, Paul Samuelson, Eugen Slutsky, and Ragnar Frisch.

Finally, the Engagements series includes Chipman's lecture notes, exams, and reading lists from his years as a professor in the Economics Department, as well as event files from conferences, workshops, travels, awards, and other activities over the course of his career as an economist.

collection icon

Lionel W. McKenzie papers, 1942-2004 and undated 22 Linear Feet — 16,500 Items

Lionel McKenzie (1919-2010) was an economist whose main areas of research were general equilbrium theory and turnpike theory. McKenzie began his career as an assistant professor at Duke University from 1948 to 1957 before becoming chairman of the Economics Department at the University of Rochester in 1957, where he taught until his retirement in 1989. McKenzie also served on a number of prominent international economic organizations, where he helped to further the discourse in the discipline. Collection contains correspondence, writings, research notes, and other written material from throughout McKenzie's career. The papers span the years 1942-2004 and document his work as an economic theorist and educator.

The Lionel W. McKenzie Papers span the years 1942 to 2004, with the bulk of the material dating from 1960 to 1990. Through correspondence, research notes, article drafts, teaching material, lectures, and published materials, the collection provides a broad overview of his professional career. McKenzie's greatest contribution to economics has been through his work in conjunction with Kenneth Arrow and Gerard Debreu on general equilibrium, and his writings on capital theory and turnpike theory, all of which are documented in a variety of forms throughout the collection. Significant correspondents include noted economists Paul Samuelson, Tjalling Koopmans, and Robert Solow. Other aspects of his career are documented, such as his involvement in a number of economic organizations, especially the Econometric Society and the Mathematical Social Sciences Board; his role as organizer of a number of academic conferences, such as the Value and Capital Conference of 1988; and his teaching career at Duke University from 1948 to 1957 and at the University of Rochester from 1957 to 1989. The papers are organized into the following series: Conferences; Correspondence; Course Materials; Organizations; Personal Files; and Research and Writings.

The Conferences Series includes material from conferences McKenzie attended and organized throughout his career and includes copies of programs, articles given, and other related documents. The Correspondence Series, the largest of the collection, contains largely official and routine correspondence, but also includes a sizeable number of letters on intellectual topics. The Research and Writings Series, the second largest, has various drafts and iterations of most of McKenzie's published work as well as some unpublished material. Many of the notes contain complicated mathematical notations documenting the theoretical foundations for his work. A small set of writings by others, chiefly on game theory and convex sets, conclude the series. The Course Materials Series houses syllabi and other materials from the seminars he taught, including many versions of the handwritten text for his general equilibrium seminar, documenting his teaching methods as well as the evolution in his thinking on the subject. In the Organizations Series, extensive documentation can be found of McKenzie's involvement with various economic organizations, including internal discussions on the workings of many of these groups. The smallest group of records, the Personal Files Series, contains curriculum vitae, personal correspondence, and other ephemera.

collection icon

Lloyd Appleton Metzler papers, 1937-1974 14 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,300 Items

Economist, University of Chicago faculty member, and consultant to a number of U.S. government agencies. Collection spans the years 1937-1974 and consists chiefly of Metzler's correspondence, notes and drafts, printed material, course-related materials, and typed copies of works by Metzler and others. Significant correspondents include Paul Samuelson and Kenneth Arrow. Most items relate to his career as an economic consultant for several U.S. government agencies including the Federal Reserve Board (1940s). Others relate to his work as a professor of economics at the University of Chicago. Topics covered by his papers include post-World War II policy and planning, British-American economic negotiations after the war, German monetary reform, monetary aspects of international trade, exchange rates, income transfer, instability theories, and the application of mathematics to economic theory. Collection may need further processing before materials can be used.

The Lloyd A. Metzler Papers span the years 1937-1974 and consist chiefly of professional correspondence, research notes ad drafts, printed material, teaching material, and typed drafts or reprints of works by Metzler and others. Significant correspondents include Moses Abramovitz, Kenneth Arrow, Harry Johnson, James Meade, and Paul Samuelson, with many letters, particularly between Meade, Metzler, and Johnson (1940s-1950s), containing in-depth exchanges about economics. There are a few exchanges with Gottfried Haberler on international trade. Several folders contain significant notes from Metzler's own student days at Harvard in the 1930s with Joseph Schumpeter, Wassily Leontief, and O. H. Taylor. Many items in the collection relate to Metzler's wartime service as an economic consultant for several U.S. government agencies including the Federal Reserve Board, as well as his post-war work with the Department of State and with the Secretary of the Treasury on monetary policy, among other issues. Other items relate to his work as a professor of economics at the University of Chicago, and offer insights into the views he held on economics in the context of the Chicago School. Topics represented by materials in the collection include post-World War II policy and planning, including British-American economic negotiations after the war and German monetary reform; monetary aspects of international trade; exchange rates; income transfer; instability theories; and the application of mathematics to economic theory. Some files of research notes and paper drafts contain unpublished work; one draft contains handwritten comments by Viner.

collection icon

Martin Bronfenbrenner papers, 1939-1995 and undated 16.2 Linear Feet — Approximately 12,000 Items

Economist on the faculty at Duke University. The professional papers of Martin Bronfenbrenner span the years 1939 to 1995 and consist of correspondence, research files, memoranda, writings (published and unpublished), teaching materials, reprints, clippings, and other papers, relating chiefly to Bronfenbrenner's research and associations in the field of economics. Topics in his research files, which make up the bulk of the collection, include income distribution theory, economic development, Marxian and radical economics (including New Left economics), labor economics, monetary economics, international economics, trade, Japanese economy and Japanese history. The collection is organized into the following series: Personal Files, Printed Material, Research and Writing Files, and Teaching Material.

The professional papers of Martin Bronfenbrenner span the years 1939 to 1995 and consist of correspondence, research files, memoranda, writings (published and unpublished), teaching materials, reprints, clippings, and other papers, relating chiefly to Bronfenbrenner's research and associations in the field of economics. The collection is organized into the following series: Personal Files, Published Material, Research and Writing Files, and Teaching Material. The Personal Papers Series includes an unpublished autobiography, a family history, and records of Bronfenbrenner's own U.S. loyalty hearings from 1954-1955. Files in the Teaching Material Series chiefly contain syllabi, course notes, and exams dating from Bronfenbrenner's time at Carnegie, Duke, and in Japan, while the Printed Material files mainly house reprints of many of his articles. The Research Files Series, divided into topical subseries, makes up the bulk of the collection, including Bronfenbrenner's research notes, articles, reprints, correspondence, lectures, and drafts of Bronfenbrenner's writings; the materials offer a rich source of unique research material on topics of interest to Bronfenbrenner such as income distribution theory, economic development, Marxian and radical economics (including New Left economics), labor economics, monetary economics, international economics, trade, Japanese economy and Japanese history. The Research Files also contains a subseries of research folders linked to individual economists in whose work Bronfenbrenner had an interest, or with whom he corresponded, or both; names include Adelman, Baumol, Friedman, Leijonhufvud, Minsky, Samuelson, Spengler, Solow, and Viner, with two folders of material on Kei Shibata, who wrote on Marxian economics and economic equilibrium during the 1930s.

collection icon
Martin Shubik is Professor Emeritus of Economics and Seymour H. Knox Professor of Mathematical Institutional Economics at Yale University and the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. The Martin Shubik Papers span the years 1938 through 2017, and consist of his correspondence, research, writings, and his collaborations and professional affiliations.

The Martin Shubik Papers document his career as an economist. This collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on general equilibrium, game theory, the core, oligopoly and market structure, defense and war game analysis, nuclear deterrence, behavior and risk, financial institutions, and money.

The collection also documents his collaborations and communications with prominent economists, including Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, Milton Friedman, Oskar Morgenstern, John Nash, Paul Samuelson, Herbert Scarf, Lloyd Shapley, and others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Shubik's time at IBM, his consultancy work for the RAND Corporation, expert witness testimony, his role as a conference organizer and participant, and other professional activities; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Yale University.