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Aaron Siskind photographs of Harlem, circa 1933-1941 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box; 24 print

Collection consists of 24 black-and-white signed prints by photographer Aaron Siskind, documenting life in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. The images, produced for two photo projects, "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world," feature portraits of African American men, women, and children; street scenes; images from the Apollo and Lafayette theaters, a night club, and a church; and the interiors and exteriors of tenement buildings. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 inches, with the image dimensions ranging from 9 1/8 x 8/1/2 inches to 11 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. Some of the images have two copies in the collection; thus, there are 19 unique images represented by 24 prints. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 24 black-and-white signed prints by photographer Aaron Siskind, documenting life and conditions in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. These were the earliest years of Siskind's long career, and a period of experimentation in which he mingled photography with a social purpose with images emphasizing form and light rather than social content.

The majority of the images feature portraits of African American men, women, and children in various settings: on the street; in the Apollo and Lafayette theaters; in a night club; taking part in a church service; playing around abandoned houses; and posing in the bedrooms and other interior rooms of tenement buildings. A few images focus only on buildings or outdoor settings.

Siskind included these and other images in two photo projects in which he played a central role: "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world." "Harlem document" was sponsored by the Photo League of New York. The second project unfolded from about 1939 to 1941 after Siskind left the Photo League; to a large extent, this project carried on the work of documenting street life in Harlem.

The gelatin silver prints in this collection are all signed by Siskind. They all measure 11x14 inches, with the image dimensions ranging from 9 1/8 x 8 3/4 to 11 3/4 x 9 7/5 inches. The year these particular prints were created is unknown. Some of the images have two copies in the collection; thus, this collection holds 19 unique images represented by 24 prints. Titles and dates originate from those accompanying original negatives donated by Siskind to the Eastman House; titles assigned by a former collector, present on the back of the prints, are also given in a separate note field in the collection guide entry for each print.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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International history of photography collection, 1885-1951 3 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 11 prints — 11 Items

Collection dates from 1885-1951 and comprises eleven vintage photographic prints by individuals considered to be master photographers. The prints are intended to represent major formats, techniques, and genres of the 19th and 20th centuries. Photographers whose prints are in the collection hail from Europe, the United States, and Mexico: Eugène Atget (printed by Berenice Abbot), Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, F. Holland Day, Peter Henry Emerson, Lewis Hine, Aaron Siskind, Ralph Steiner, Alfred Stieglitz, and Minor White. Formats range from photogravures to gelatin silver prints, with the latter predominating; all are black-and-white and matted. Subjects include rural landscapes, individual and group portraits, and urban streetscapes. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The International History of Photography collection dates from 1885-1951 and comprises eleven vintage photographic prints by individuals considered to be master photographers. The prints in this collection were acquired and assembled by the Rubenstein library staff, in part to provide students the opportunity to view and study original works from the world's foremost photographers as well as to learn about the major formats, techniques, and genres of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Photographers whose prints are in the collection hail from Europe, Mexico, and the United States: Eugène Atget (printed by American photographer Berenice Abbot), Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, F. Holland Day, Peter Henry Emerson, Lewis Hine, Aaron Siskind, Ralph Steiner, Alfred Stieglitz, and Minor White. The print by Eugène Atget, "Flower Man," was printed by well-known American photographer Berenice Abbot, who purchased part of Atget's negative archive in 1928.

Formats range from photogravures to gelatin silver prints, with the latter predominating; all are black-and-white and are matted. Subjects include rural landscapes, individual and group portraits, architecture, and urban streetscapes. The prints are sized from 4.5 x 6.5 inches to approximately 9.5 x 13.5 inches, and are all matted.

Researchers must wear gloves when handling the prints. Prints should always be picked up and supported with two hands. The prints cannot be removed from the mats, but researchers may open the window mat to see the full print. The Archive of Documentary Arts Curator must be consulted prior to any display of the photographs.

Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts at Duke University.