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Collection

Charles Howell Foster papers, 1920-1979 0.5 Linear Feet — 134 Items

Professor of American Literature, University of Minnesota. The collection is largely correspondence but also includes clippings.

Correspondence (1936-1979) chiefly from or pertaining to Norman Foerster, professor of English and pioneer in the teaching of American literature, discussing Foster's career and Foerster's activities following his resignation from the University of Iowa, 1944. Also, clippings about or references to Robert Frost and Harriet Beecher Stowe; and printed material.

Collection
Harriet Elisabeth Beecher Stowe (1811 June 14-1896 July 1) was an American abolitionist and author. Collection comprises an introduction and a letter written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, along with a carte de visite of her. There is an undated introduction she wrote for the second edition of Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Stowe's statement appears as an introduction in some copies of the 1853 edition. In the introduction, Stowe discusses the African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, remarking on her mental energy and revelatory powers as a Christian, and attests to Truth's character. She then mentions that the sales of the work will "secure a home for [Truth in] her old age ..." There is an undated letter Stowe wrote from Northampton Depot on Aug. 10 to Mr. Ward, informing him that although she is disposed to support his request, she is under pressures that limit her use of the pen. The carte de visite features a textured surface, and was created by the Howell studio in New York.

Collection comprises an introduction and a letter written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, along with a carte de visite of her. There is an undated introduction she wrote for the second edition of Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Stowe's statement appears as an introduction in some copies of the 1853 edition. In the introduction, Stowe discusses the African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, remarking on her mental energy and revelatory powers as a Christian, and attests to Truth's character. She then mentions that the sales of the work will "secure a home for [Truth in] her old age ..." There is an undated letter Stowe wrote from Northampton Depot on Aug. 10 to Mr. Ward, informing him that although she is disposed to support his request, she is under pressures that limit her use of the pen. The carte de visite features a textured surface, and was created by the Howell studio in New York.

Collection
Harriet Martineau was a British social theorist and Whig writer, often cited as the first female sociologist. Collection comprises 21 letters written by Harriet Martineau from Ambleside between 1868 and 1876, primarily to Mr. (John?) Robinson, with one letter to Prime Minister Gladstone regarding her rejection of a pension (1873 June 3). A few letters are incomplete. In addition, there are four undated fragments of letters. Topics include the republishing of her biographical sketches originally published in the Daily Mail; scandals of the period, particularly the Harriet Beecher Stowe-Lady Byron scandal and the John Stuart Mill and Harriet Taylor scandal, along with Martineau's associated writings; re-publication of Eastern Life: Present & Past and her holding of copyright; the 2nd edition of Traditions of Palestine; and the autobiography of Brougham and its errors about Martineau and her family, which she wishes corrected in the Daily News. Other topics include liberal politics, religion, her declining health and need of a companion and servants, her rejection of a pension, and planned meetings with Robinson, as well as condolences sent on the death of his son. There is an additional letter written on behalf of Martineau by Miss Goodwin to an unidentified addressee, regarding politics and Martineau's health (1873 February 20).

Collection comprises 21 letters written by Harriet Martineau from Ambleside between 1868 and 1876, primarily to Mr. (John?) Robinson, with one letter to Prime Minister Gladstone regarding her rejection of a pension (1873 June 3). A few letters are incomplete. In addition, there are four undated fragments of letters. Topics include the republishing of her biographical sketches originally published in the Daily Mail; scandals of the period, particularly the Harriet Beecher Stowe-Lady Byron scandal and the John Stuart Mill and Harriet Taylor scandal, along with Martineau's associated writings; re-publication of Eastern Life: Present & Past and her holding of copyright; the 2nd edition of Traditions of Palestine; and the autobiography of Brougham and its errors about Martineau and her family, which she wishes corrected in the Daily News. Other topics include liberal politics, religion, her declining health and need of a companion and servants, her rejection of a pension, and planned meetings with Robinson, as well as condolences sent on the death of his son. There is an additional letter written on behalf of Martineau by Miss Goodwin to an unidentified addressee, regarding politics and Martineau's health (1873 February 20).

Collection

James D. B. De Bow papers, 1779-1915 6.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,618 Items

Editor, publisher, statistician, and pro-secessionist residing in New Orleans, Louisiana. Collection comprises business and personal correspondence, diary, and other papers. Much of the material relates to "De Bow's Review," an agricultural and economic newspaper and pro-secession, pro-slavery publication which he founded and edited from 1846-1867, and to De Bow's position as agent for the Confederacy's cotton and produce loan, with many letters to and from Christopher G. Memminger and George A. Trenholm concerning details of the loan. Includes early items apparently collected in connection with De Bow's statistical work, essays written while a student at Charleston College, lectures on temperance, and a scrapbook of accounts of Civil War campaigns. Correspondents include John W. Daniel, Charles E. Fenner, George Fitzhugh, Charles Gayarré, Alexander D. Von Humboldt, Freeman Hunt, Edmund Ruffin, William Gilmore Simms, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Maunsel White.

Business and personal papers of an editor and agricultural and commercial reformer, including copies of historical documents apparently collected by De Bow in connection with his statistical work for the state of Louisiana and the U.S. Census Bureau; a diary, 1836-1842; essays written while a student at College of Charleston, 1840-1843; two temperance lectures delivered during a tour of New England, 1844; letters from Maunsell White concerning White's backing of De Bow's Review; correspondence with the Review's agents and subscribers; the journal's bills and accounts; records, including correspondence with Christopher Gustavus Memminger and George Alfred Trenholm, relating to the Confederacy's cotton and produce loan; postwar letters concerning proposed railroads between the South and the West, especially the Tennessee and Pacific Railroad; letters to De Bow's wife, Martha E. (Johns) De Bow, from her girlhood friends and from De Bow; and De Bow's history of the Civil War, written for his children.

Other correspondents include Charles Gayarré, George Fitzhugh, Edmund Ruffin, William Gilmore Simms, Charles E. Penner, Freeman Hunt, John W. Daniel, Eugene F. Falconnet, Charles Frederick Holmes, John McRae, Oliver Otis Howard, Reverdy Johnson, Robert E. Barnwell, and William W. Boyce. The collection is rounded out by a one-volume scrapbook containing accounts of Civil War campaigns collected by De Bow.