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Civil Rights Movement and Wayside Theatre photographs, 1960s 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 box — 18 prints

Collection comprises 18 black-and-white photographs taken in the 1960s, assembled by a private collector and organized into two distinct groups: nine journalistic photographs documenting civil rights movement events, some credited to Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) photographers Cliff Vaughs, Danny Lyon, and Rufus Hinton, with others unattributed; and nine prints of an unidentified multi-racial dramatic performance, circa mid-1960s, found in the archives of the Wayside Theatre in Middletown, Virginia. The Civil Rights prints typically include detailed press captions on the backs, and include images of injured and jailed demonstrators, police, bombed-out churches, and portraits of activists Fannie Lou Hamer and Atlanta's Markham Street rent protest leader Willie Williams. All the prints except one measure roughly 8x10 inches. Acquired as part of the John Hope Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises 18 black-and-white photographs taken in the 1960s, assembled by a private collector and organized into two distinct groups: nine journalistic photographs documenting civil rights movement events, some credited to Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) photographers Cliff Vaughs, Danny Lyon, and Rufus Hinton, with others unattributed; and nine prints of an unidentified multi-racial staged production.

The Civil Rights prints typically feature detailed press captions on the backs, and include images of bombed-out churches, injured and jailed demonstrators, police, and portraits of activist Fannie Lou Hamer and Atlanta's Markham Street housing protest leader Willie Williams. Some prints also bear a SNCC photo credit stamp with the organization's Atlanta address.

The second group consists of two contact sheets and seven prints showing an unidentified multi-racial dramatic or musical performance perhaps staged by the Wayside Theatre in Middletown, Virginia, or may possibly be related to the Garrick Players in Washington, D.C. or to the Free Southern Theater founded by SNCC. The time period appears to be the early 1960s.

All the prints except one are roughly 8x10 inches.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Cleveland Sellers is a veteran civil rights activist who helped lead the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. The Cleveland Sellers Papers consist of SNCC and other Civil Rights-era publications and correspondence, including items from the Holly Springs COFO office and the Virginia Students' Civil Rights Committee.

Collection contains assorted printed materials, publications, correspondence, and clippings related to the activities of SNCC and its affiliates during the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. Materials have been sorted into series: Publications, Correspondence, Holly Springs Project, Virginia Students' Civil Rights Committee, Statements/Press Releases/Flyers, and Subject Files.

Much of the material is ephemeral and scattered; some authors are unknown. There are some items that have evidence of water damage or mold and are in poor physical condition.

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Collection contains subject files, clippings, and reunion materials collected by Constance Curry, a civil rights activist and member of SNCC's executive board. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of Curry's early SNCC documents, including records of outsider support, as well as clippings and ephemera from the Mississippi Freedom Project and other SNCC initiatives. Also contains Curry's subject files on figures like Ella Baker and Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture), and clippings from various SNCC reunions and anniversaries in the 1990s and 2000s. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African American History and Culture.

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Courtland Cox is a civil rights activist and former member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the manager and co-owner of the Drum and Speak Bookstore. The Courtland Cox Papers consist of Drum and Spear materials, materials related to his tenure as the Secretary General of the Sixth Pan-African Congress, as well as subject files.

Collection contains materials related to Cox's management of the Drum and Spear Bookstore and Press, his tenure as the Secretary General of the Sixth Pan-African Congress, and his collected civil rights era subject files.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Donald Harris is a SNCC veteran and civil rights movement activist. This collection contains materials from his participation in SNCC including clippings, writings and articles, some ephemera, and other printed materials about SNCC.

This collection contains materials from Don Harris's involvement in SNCC, particularly in SNCC-led voter registration efforts in Southwest Georgia during the early 1960s. Also included are legal and media documents regarding his arrest on insurrection charges in August 1963, and a report from a 1964 trip across the African continent. Contains SNCC buttons and brochures. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center at Rubenstein Library.

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Faith Holsaert papers, 1950-2011 10.2 Linear Feet — 6525 items

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Faith Holsaert is a Civil Rights and LGBT community activist. The collection contains correspondence, newsletters, publications, and other materials relating to the activities of Faith Holsaert from the 1960s to the present. A large portion of the collection consists of correspondence and ephemera from her involvement in the Civil Rights movement, including SNCC, and the women's rights movement. Also includes materials from the writing and publishing of Hands on the Freedom Plow, some of which is restricted. The collection also has a large amount of personal memorabilia and materials relating to Holsaert's childhood and family. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Correspondence, newsletters, publications, and other materials relating to the activities of Faith Holsaert from the 1960s to the present. A large portion of the collection consists of correspondence and ephemera from her involvement in the Civil Rights movement, including SNCC, and the women's rights movement. Also includes materials from the writing and publishing of Hands on the Freedom Plow, some of which is restricted. The collection also has a large amount of personal memorabilia and materials relating to Holsaert's childhood and family.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Florence Tate (1931-2014) was a civil rights and pan-African activist based in Washington, DC. Involved in activism in support of Angolan independence, she later worked in support of the UNITA faction in the Angolan Civil War. In the United States, she worked as a press secretary for the first mayoral administration of Marion Barry and subsequently for the 1984 presidential campaign of Jesse Jackson.

The largest series, African Politics, contains material from Tate's activism in support of the Southwestern African nation of Angola. As an organizer of several groups which sought to connect Angolans with African Americans, this series features correspondence, official communiques with the UNITA leadership, government documents, and clippings from African newspapers and journals.

The U.S. Politics series highlights Tate's role as a press secretary for both Mayor Marion Barry and Senator Jesse Jackson, during the latter's 1984 presidential campaign. Of particular importance is her role in organizing and documenting Jackson's 1984 mission to Syria to free downed Navy pilot Robert O. Goodman, shot down by Syrian forces over Lebanon during the height of the Lebanese Civil War.

The Name and Subject series is based on material related to organizations that Tate created and lead. She collected materials related to Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael) and Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin (H. Rap Brown), among others. There is also information collected related to Southern African nations of Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The Personal Materials series features correspondence, photographs, and articles written by Florence Tate. It highlights her career as a journalist in Dayton, Ohio during the mid-1960s, when she was active with local CORE and SNCC organizations.

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James H. Karales photographs, 1953-2006 and undated 18 Linear Feet — Approximately 15,000 items

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Noted American photojournalist who worked for LOOK magazine; resident of New York, N.Y. The collection spans the years 1953 to 2006 and houses a nearly-complete photographic archive of photojournalist James Karales, active from the 1950s to the 1980s. The majority of the images in the collection originated from Karales' documentary work for Look magazine during the 1960s. His major projects include images from Rendville, Ohio, a coal mining town and one of the first racially integrated towns in Appalachia; Vietnam during the war; New York's Lower East Side; Oregon logging; and individuals and events of the Civil Rights movement during the 1960s, housed in three inter-related groups - the Martin Luther King, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and Civil Rights Series. Other smaller projects include images of California, New Mexico, and other subjects. Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to almost all of the prints and negatives in the collection; black-and-white proof prints and finished prints ranging from 8.5x14 to 16x20 inches; original negatives (closed to research use); and over 1100 color slides. There are also many print materials and some correspondence and audiovisual materials. Acquired by the Center of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection spans the years 1953 to 2006 and houses a nearly complete photographic archive of well-known 20th century American photojournalist James Karales. The majority of the images in the collection originated from Karales' documentary work for Look magazine during the 1960s. The collection is organized around the following project series: Rendville, Ohio, a declining coal mining town and one of the first racially integrated towns in Appalachia; Vietnam, where Karales documented many scenes from the Vietnam War - the largest series in the collection; the Lower East Side, featuring street scenes and portraits from that New York City neighborhood; and Logging, where Karales documented the Pacific Northwest logging industry's practices and culture. Finally, Karales also shot many images of individuals and events of the Civil Rights movement during the 1960s, housed in three inter-related groups: the Martin Luther King Series; Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Series; and the Civil Rights Series.

There is also a small group of supporting materials in the Manuscript and Printed Materials Series and the Audiovisual Materials Series that includes biographical documents such as Karales' curriculum vitae; Karales' essays on photography and teaching; publicity for exhibits and other events; correspondence with publishers; digitized images of Vietnam photos on a CD; and clippings, magazine layouts, and other materials related to Karales' published work. One recently dated item is an audiocassette of remarks on Karales' life and works made by Sam Stephenson at the opening of an exhibit of Karales' work at the Rubenstein Library at Duke University.

Publications where Karales' works appeared include Look, Life, Saturday Review, Pageant, Coronet, Popular Photography, Time-Life books, and several encyclopedias. Karales also produced commercial work for corporate annual reports. The collection does not include Karales' photojournalistic work from East Germany (1970), or Gheel, Belgium (1961). A number of Karales' images from the U.S. civil rights movement achieved iconographic status, and were - and still are - widely reproduced. His work is represented in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to most but not all of the prints and negatives in the collection; black-and-white proof prints and finished prints ranging from 8.5x14 to 16x20 inches; original negatives (closed to research use); and several hundred color slides. Unless otherwise noted, the photographic items are arranged in the following sequence in each series: contact sheets, prints (from smallest to largest), slides, negatives, and finally, duplicates. There are also digital jpeg files for selected images in certain series (Vietnam, Rendville). One print in the Civil Rights series was created by documentary photographer Alex Harris for an exhibit at Duke University and is noted in the collection guide's entry for this print.

Beginning with the contact sheets, researchers using the collection can note any identifying codes for the image, which may include Karales' job number (Karales assigned most of his jobs or photographic projects alpha-numeric codes), roll number, and frame (image) number, in that order. Whenever possible, Rubenstein staff have included these numbers with individual prints and negatives and within the collection's inventory to aid in matching nd discovery. In addition, staff have noted where film rolls are located within folders. For finished prints (typically 11x14 inches and larger), individual descriptions and unique Rubenstein library identifiers (beginning with "RL") have been assigned. There are a few images that have no identifying numbers and could not otherwise be identified from contact sheets or negatives. Such captions appear in brackets.

In order to facilitate the use of the materials, please consult with a Research Services archivist before coming to use this collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Joseph A. Sinsheimer papers, 1962-1987 5 Linear Feet — 689 items

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Joseph A. Sinsheimer graduated from Duke University in 1987 with an A.B. in History. He recorded oral histories of the Mississippi civil rights movement between 1983 and 1987, with grant support from the Lyndhurst Foundation. Collection includes audio recordings and transcripts of oral history interviews and speeches regarding the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Mississippi in the 1960s, with brief summaries. Focus is on the "Freedom Summer" of 1964. Notable interviews include Robert Parris Moses, Sam Block, Hazel Palmer, Jesse Jackson, Gray Evans, Frank Smith, and many more. Collection also contains a small amount of manuscript materials from the civil rights era, including clippings, reports, scrapbooks, and correspondence.

The collection chronicles the work of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and its involvement with resident civil rights activists in Mississippi. Materials consist primarily of recorded oral histories and their transcriptions, but also extend to speeches and unpublished papers. The records date from 1962 to 1987, and were compiled and collected by Duke University alumnus Joseph A. Sinsheimer with the support of a fellowship from the Lyndhurst Foundation.

Local activists represent their experiences in a series of twenty-five interviews that were conducted at movement centers throughout Mississippi, including McComb, Jackson, Greenwood, and Clarksdale. Leading SNCC activists Samuel Block, David Dennis, and Silas McGhee are also represented in interviews conducted between 1983 and 1987. There are also four extensive interviews and transcribed speeches of noted SNCC activist and leader of the Mississippi civil rights movement Robert Moses, as well as interviews of community leaders C.C. Bryant and Hazel Palmer, conducted by Moses himself. The collection also features unpublished speeches and papers given in the 1960s; additionally, transcripts of exchanges at academic conferences extend the scope of the collection to reconstructions of events by historians in the 1970s and 1980s. The collection also contains court records and correspondence to national leaders like Hubert Humphrey and Robert Kennedy, which report on the use of organized violence in the counter-efforts of segregationists.

Sinsheimer's records have already been cited by historians Taylor Branch and William Chafe, and played a significant role in the 1994 documentary "Freedom on my Mind." Although Sinsheimer's published articles on the Mississippi Movement have focused on the resistance of SNCC to segregationists policies and organized violence, the documentation of this collection sheds light on a wider range of concerns. The interviews detail the role of the black church in organizational activities; sexism within the movement; the establishment of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in 1964; black nationalism and the role of white student workers in the civil rights movement after the "Freedom Summer;" as well as the significance of national media in the struggle.

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Judy Richardson is a veteran of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who worked in Mississippi during the Mississippi Freedom Summer Project in 1964. She later worked with Blackside, Inc., on the Eyes on the Prize civil rights documentary series, and co-edited Hands on the Freedom Plow, about women's experiences in SNCC. Her papers include materials from her years working on staff at SNCC in Atlanta and Mississippi; her involvement with the Drum and Spear Bookstore in Washington D.C.; extensive print and audiovisual materials from her work in documentary film, including projects like Malcolm X: Make It Plain, Eyes on the Prize, and Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre; her correspondence and drafts from the editing of Hands on the Freedom Plow; project and event files from numerous committees, speaking engagements, and panels; personal files, including her FOIA about her SNCC service in the 1960s; and subject files collected from various projects.

The Judy Richardson Papers include materials from her years working on staff at SNCC in Atlanta and Mississippi; her involvement with the Drum and Spear Bookstore in Washington D.C.; extensive print and audiovisual materials from her work in documentary film, including projects like Malcolm X: Make It Plain, Eyes on the Prize, and Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre; her correspondence and drafts from the editing of Hands on the Freedom Plow; project and event files from numerous committees, speaking engagements, and panels; personal files, including her FOIA about her SNCC service in the 1960s; and subject files collected from various projects.

Materials are arranged into series based on format and topic. The Hands on the Freedom Plow Series is closed until 2020. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use.