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Athletic Council records, 1907 - 1993 11 Linear Feet — 9500 Items

The Duke University Athletic Council began in 1907 as the Trinity College Athletic Council. Since that time, it has offered advice and recommendations on the administration of athletics at Duke. The collection includes correspondence, reports, memoranda, minutes, athletic contracts, schedules, statistics, handbooks, newsletters, financial information, and other materials. Major topics include athletics at Duke University, especially football and basketball; Duke's relationship to intercollegiate athletics associations like the ACC (Atlantic Coast Conference), NCAA (National Collegiate Athletics Association), AIAW (Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women), and CFA (College Football Association); the financing of college athletics; the management of college athletics; college athletes; and Title IX. English.

The collection includes correspondence, reports, memoranda, minutes, athletic contracts, schedules, statistics, handbooks, newsletters, financial information, and other materials related to the Athletic Council. The first series, Trinity College Athletic Council, contains materials related to the earliest form of the organization. The other materials in the collection derive from the later Duke University Athletic Council. The second series, Duke Athletic Council, contains meetings, minutes, and general files of the Duke Athletic Council. The sixth series, Restricted, contains restricted materials such as student information and Board of Trustee materials. The third series, ACC contains material related to intercollegiate athletics in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The fourth series, NCAA contains minutes, convention proceedings, correspondence, reports and other materials related to intercollegiate athletics in the National Collegiate Athletics Association. The sixth series AIAW contains information about intercollegiate athletics for women. The last series, Oversized Material, contains one folder from the Duke Athletic Council Series.

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Bassett Affair collection, 1903 - 2003 2 Linear Feet — 300 Items

The Bassett Affair is a celebrated case that helped establish the concept of academic freedom in higher education in the United States and is a benchmark incident in race relations in the South. John Spencer Bassett, a Trinity College professor, published a series of articles in the South Atlantic Quarterly (1903) that praised the accomplishments of African Americans and offered views on how to improve race relations. A campaign to remove Bassett from the faculty was thwarted by a vote of support for Bassett from the University's Board of Trustees on Dec. 2, 1903. The collection contains essays, articles, clippings, correspondence, reminiscences, and other published and unpublished matter including Bassett's article, Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy (1903); a scrapbook, 1903-1904, kept by Trinity College officials with newspaper clippings documenting national coverage the case received; copies of letters by Theodore Roosevelt to Owen Wister (1906) commenting on the case and on Trinity; manuscripts of My Recollections of the Bassett Trial, by Robert Lee Durham (1936), The Bassett Affair: A Play in Six Acts, by Baird Straughan (1975), and Crisis at Trinity a play by John Merritt (1989); lists of related materials in other collections; various shorter articles and speeches including comments by Richard L. Watson and an address to the Academic Council by Terry Sanford; and materials from the centennial celebration of the Bassett Affair, collected by University Archives staff. English.

The collection contains essays, articles, clippings, correspondence, reminiscences, and other published and unpublished matter including Bassett's article, "Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy" (1903); a scrapbook, 1903-1904, kept by Trinity College officials with newspaper clippings documenting national coverage the case received; copies of letters by Theodore Roosevelt to Owen Wister (1906) commenting on the case and on Trinity; manuscripts of "My Recollections of the Bassett Trial," by Robert Lee Durham (1936), "The Bassett Affair: A Play in Six Acts," by Baird Straughan (1975), and "Crisis at Trinity" a play by John Merritt (1989); lists of related materials in other collections; various shorter articles and speeches including comments by Richard L. Watson and an address to the Academic Council by Terry Sanford; and materials from the centennial celebration of the Bassett Affair, collected by University Archives staff.

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Benjamin Newton Duke (1855-1929) was a tobacco manufacturer, industrialist, and philanthropist of Durham, NC and New York, NY and a trustee and major benefactor of Trinity College (later Duke University). He was the son of Washington Duke, older brother of James B. Duke, husband of Sarah Pearson Angier Duke, and father of Angier Buchanan Duke and Mary Duke Biddle. The materials in this collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries in North Carolina and New York and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr., series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

The papers of Benjamin Newton Duke have been collected from various sources over time and span the years 1834 to 1969, although the bulk of the material dates from 1890 to 1929. The materials in the collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family in Durham, NC and New York, NY, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. Types of material in the collection include correspondence, financial statements and ledgers, bills and receipts, architectural blueprints and drawings, land plats, deeds, photographs, photograph albums, scrapbooks, and a diary.

Family members represented include Sarah P. Duke, Angier Buchanan Duke, Mary Duke Biddle, Washington Duke, James B. Duke, Brodie L. Duke, Lida Duke Angier, and Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr. Other individuals represented include Julian S. Carr, William A. Erwin, John C. Kilgo, William P. Few, Daniel Lindsay Russell, James E. Shepard, and George W. Watts.

The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr. series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

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The Columbian Literary Society was founded in 1846. The Hesperian Literary Society was founded in 1851. Records of both the Columbian Literary Society and Hesperian Literary Society documenting their activities. Included are numerous minute books, roll books, treasurer's books, book lists, constitutions and bylaws as well as some correspondence and programs for events co-hosted by the societies.

Contains correspondence, reports, financial information, roll books, record books, and minute books of the Columbian and Hesperian Literary Societies. The two societies conducted many joint debates so their papers are in one collection. Most of the collection is in oversize boxes. The collection ranges in date from 1848-1942.

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Duke University has celebrated anniversaries of two major founding events: the establishment of continuous education at Brown's Schoolhouse in Randolph County, N.C., in 1838, and the creation of the Duke Endowment, which transformed Trinity College into Duke University in 1924. As a result, the institution commemorated the 100th Anniversary of its beginnings in Randolph County in 1938/1939, the 50th Anniversary of the Duke Endowment and founding of Duke University in 1974/1975, the 150th Anniversary of its beginnings in Randolph County in 1988/1989, and the 75th Anniversary of the Duke Endowment and founding of Duke University in 1999/2000. The Duke University Anniversaries Collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, printed matter, programs, speeches, a sound recording, a diary, acknowledgements from other institutions, a time capsule, and other materials relating to events commemorating the beginnings and founding of Duke University. Major subjects include events planning, fund raising, Duke University, Trinity College (Randolph Co., N.C. and Durham, N.C.), Normal College (Randolph Co., N.C.), Union Institute (Randolph Co., N.C.), and Brown's Schoolhouse (Randolph Co., N.C.). English.

The Duke University Anniversaries Collection is divided into four series, arranged by anniversary. 50th Anniversary (1924-1974) of the founding of Duke University series includes correspondence, planning materials, programs, meeting minutes, financial statements, printed matter, and clippings created by the 50th Anniversary Steering and Advisory Committees. Materials range in date from 1973 to 1975. The 75th Anniversary (1924-1999) of the founding of Duke University series includes logos, a commemorative mailing cancellation stamp, a press release, and a sound recording of a speech given by John Koskinen on the Y2K conversion. Materials range in date from 1999 to 2000.

The 100th Anniversary (1838-1938) of the beginnings of Duke University series includes printed materials, correspondence, Centennial Fund records, a diary, publications, invitation lists, congratulations from other institutions, and several complete packets of centennial celebration materials. Also included is a time capsule, labeled: "1939-2039. A collection of items presented to the President of Duke University at the Centennial Celebration, April 22, 1939; not to be opened until the occasion of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the institution." Materials range in date from 1937 to 1939. Finally, the 150th Anniversary (1838-1988) of the beginnings of Duke University series includes articles, printed matter, correspondence, clippings, subject files, photographs, programs, and financial materials. Major subjects include Sesquicentennial Celebration planning and events, the historical marker for Brown's Schoolhouse, and the plaque and maintenance of the Trinity College Memorial Gazebo in Randolph County. Materials range in date from 1988 to 2000 (bulk 1988-1989). The collection also includes a program from the Centennial Celebration of the relocation of Trinity College to Durham, 1992.

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This collection consists of original and copy negatives taken by various sources over several decades. Most of the negatives were produced by the Office of News and Communication's News Bureau in the early years of Duke University and later by University Photography (upon its establishment).

Contains negatives and some matching prints of University-related subjects, including people (i.e. faculty, trustees, students, etc.), buildings, construction, schools and departments. While dates range from 1855-1995, it is necessary to note that the majority of the negatives are copy negatives, rather than originals. While a good number of original negatives are included in this collection, the user should be aware that some of the corresponding dates refer to when the copy negative was made, not when the original picture was taken. In most cases, it is noted on the negative sleeve if the negative is a copy or an original. Furthermore, users should be aware that some negatives are of published material. For instance, several pages from the Chanticleer and the Chronicle were photographed and the negatives were kept. On some of the sleeves, users will find notes presumably made by the photographer regarding print quality.

An attempt was made to bring a cohesiveness to the negative collection for easier patron and staff access. The negatives are arranged in the following series: Subject Negatives, General Negatives, Building Negatives, Construction Negatives, Faculty Negatives, Medical Center Negatives, and Numbered Negatives. The Numbered Negatives are copy negatives pulled from the larger University Archives Photograph Collection. Any future additions to the negative collection will follow the numbering format.

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John Spencer Bassett, a professor in the History Department of Trinity College from 1893-1906, was a renowned educator and advocate of freedom of expression. A native of North Carolina, Bassett received his A.B. from Trinity College in 1888 and his doctorate at Johns Hopkins University in 1894. He returned to Trinity College to teach and was active in teaching, writing and collecting southern Americana. Bassett began publication of an annual series of Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society; founded the honorary society 9019, a precursor to Phi Beta Kappa; founded and edited the scholarly journal, the South Atlantic Quarterly; and encouraged his students to publish and fostered their interests in Southern history. In 1903, Bassett published an article, Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy in the South Atlantic Quarterly, that praised the accomplishments of African Americans and offered views on how to improve race relations. Bassett's views brought on a controversy that became known as the Bassett Affair that helped to establish the concept of academic freedom in higher education in the United States. The collection contains personal and professional papers related to the life and work of John Spencer Bassett. Materials range in date from 1802 to 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) and include biographical information, correspondence, printed material, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, and souvenirs. English.

The collection contains personal and professional papers related to the life and work of John Spencer Bassett. Materials range in date from 1802 to 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) and include biographical information, correspondence, printed material, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, and souvenirs. The correspondence (1893-1917) includes a copy of a 1911 letter to Charles Frances Adams in which Bassett gives his account of the Bassett Affair. Other correspondents include Oswald G. Villard, William Kenneth Boyd, Edwin Mims, and William E. Dodd. Much of the original correspondence concerns affairs of the Roanoke Colony Memorial Association. Clippings ([1802]-1896) include articles about North Carolina politics, Civil War history, the Bassett Affair, Trinity College matters, race relations, the media, and education. The manuscripts include the autobiography of Jessie Lewellin Bassett, wife of John Spencer Bassett, in which she describes her life from 1866 until her marriage to Bassett in 1892; a copy of the paper, "How to Collect and Preserve Historical Material," that Bassett presented to the State Historical Association on Oct. 23, 1900; and John L. Woodward's Ph.B. thesis, "Causes and Progress of the Revolutionary Movement in North Carolina," (1894).

The bulk of John Spencer Bassett's personal papers can be found in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress.

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Luther L. Gobbel papers, 1849-1979 3.2 Linear Feet — 2,024 Items

College administrator and educator. Served as president of Greensboro College (1936-1952) and Lambuth College (1952-1962), as well as Conference Superintendent of the Sunday School Board of the N.C. Conference (1920's) and Director of Church Relations at California Western University at San Diego for three years. Correspondence, printed material, financial papers, certificates, writings, and photographs relating mostly to Dr. Gobbel's career. Topics include: biographical information about Gobbel and Mrs. Gobbel (d. 1966); college education; education and the church; Methodist Episcopal Church, including the Sunday School Board of the N.C. Conference; East-West Expressway controversy in Durham, 1970s; education in China, 1937; Protestant churches in Czechoslovakia, 1961; financial papers of Robert A. Gobbel of Rowan Co., N.C., 1870s-1890s; inauguration of Gobbel as president of Greensboro College; his term as president of Lambuth College; a description of a trip taken by Dr. and Mrs. Gobbel through eight Latin American countries, New Orleans, and Atlanta in 1965; and Gobbel's service in World War I. Includes family and professional photographs (some of Methodist Church personnel); Trinity College scrapbook, 1913-1918; and two personal scrapbooks of Dr. Gobbel relating his career.

Correspondence, printed material, financial papers, certificates, writings, and photographs relating mostly to Dr. Gobbel's career. Topics include: biographical information about Gobbel and Mrs. Gobbel (d. 1966); college education; education and the church; Methodist Episcopal Church, including the Sunday School Board of the N.C. Conference; East-West Expressway controversy in Durham, 1970s; education in China, 1937; Protestant churches in Czechoslovakia, 1961; financial papers of Robert A. Gobbel of Rowan Co., N.C., 1870s-1890s; inauguration of Gobbel as president of Greensboro College; his term as president of Lambuth College; a description of a trip taken by Dr. and Mrs. Gobbel through eight Latin American countries, New Orleans, and Atlanta in 1965; and Gobbel's service in World War I. Includes family and professional photographs (some of Methodist Church personnel); Trinity College scrapbook, 1913-1918; and two personal scrapbooks of Dr. Gobbel relating his career.

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Society of the 9019 records, 1892-1943 5.5 Linear Feet — 2500 Items

The Society of 9019, organized in February 1890 under the leadership of John Spencer Bassett, was an honorary scholarship fraternity. The society began at Trinity College and continued on at Duke University. Acceptance into the 9019 was based, in part, on an academic average of 90 or above. It was also conditioned upon a scholastic average of 2.25 quality points, making it similar to the male only Phi Beta Kappa society. The 9019 is credited with establishing the South Atlantic Quarterly, supporting scholarly activities among North Carolina high schools, and establishing student-faculty forums on a variety of timely subjects. The group disbanded in the early 1940s. The 9019 records contain ritual and member lists, program and contest advertisements, ceremonial robes, founding documents, letters, photographs, memorabilia and other papers related to this honor society. The dates of the materials range from 1892-1944.

The 9019 records contain ritual and member lists, program and contest advertisements, ceremonial robes, founding documents, letters, photographs, memorabilia and other papers related to this honor society. Major subjects include: intellectual life; student societies; initiations and rites and ceremonies; oratory competitions, and the South Atlantic Quarterly. The dates of the materials range from 1892-1944.

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In 1892, Dr. Stephen B. Weeks, a professor of history at Trinity College, organized the Trinity College Historical Society. The goals of the Society were to collect, arrange, and preserve written materials and artifacts illustrative of the history of North Carolina and the South, and to promote the study of Southern history through lectures and publications. The Society benefited from the strong leadership of two history professors, John Spencer Bassett and William Kenneth Boyd. They made wide appeals for donations of historical materials and maintained a museum to house these relics. The meetings of the Society, held several times each year, provided a forum at which students and faculty could read their research papers and discuss their ideas. The best of these papers were published, from 1897 to 1956, in the Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society. The collection includes historical notes about Trinity College and the Society, correspondence, meeting announcements, administrative files, publications, speeches, and artifacts. Materials range in date from [1492?] to 1981. English.

The collection includes a wide variety of material concerning the Trinity College Historical Society and ranges in date from [1492?] to 1981. The material includes historical notes, about Trinity College and the Trinity College Historical Society and includes transcribed notes, rosters, lists of donations, records, reviews of activities, stationary, and clippings. The correspondence and meeting announcements, [1926]-1981, includes general correspondence about the business of the Trinity College Historical Society and announcements and publicity for upcoming meetings. The administrative files, 1892-1978, includes minutes of the meetings held by the Trinity College Historical Society, and files kept by the presidents, secretaries, and treasurers of the Society. Publications, 1897-1979, include copies of the Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society and newsletters published from 1978-1979. Speeches, 1904-[1980], include notes, original manuscripts, and copies of speeches and papers presented at the meetings of the Trinity College Historical Society. The artifacts, [1492?]-1918, include items collected from all aspects of American life. These relics range from coins and medals, to wooden shoe soles, to a piece of what was thought to be Christopher Columbus's flag.

In January 2007, Box 20 and folders 170 and 173 were transferred to the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, North Carolina.