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The Duke University Board of Trustees has existed since 1924, and grew out of the Trinity College Board of Trustees that existed from 1859 to 1924. The Board is responsible for making major steering decisions in the administration of the school. The Board of Trustees records contain minutes, agendas, correspondence, reports, subject files, trustee handbooks, and other records of the Board and Executive, standing, and ad hoc committees. The minutes include reports, correspondence, resolutions, recommendations for the conferring of degrees, for employment and renewal of employment, and other material. Reports include those made by University officers, Board committees, and outside consultants. The Board's records also include statements of funds and scholarships, investment reports, correspondence, audits, bylaws, petitions from students, and other material. English.

The Board of Trustees records contain minutes, agendas, correspondence, reports, subject files, trustee handbooks, and other records of the Board and Executive, standing, and ad hoc committees. The minutes include reports, correspondence, resolutions, recommendations for the conferring of degrees, for employment and renewal of employment, and other material. Reports include those made by University officers, Board committees, and outside consultants. The Board's records also include statements of funds and scholarships, investment reports, correspondence, audits, bylaws, petitions from students, and other material. The minute book covering June 1901-June 1910 was destroyed by fire in 1911, but some handwritten minutes for the period were preserved and have been typed out. There are gaps in the minutes for the period 1925-1930.

The collection is divided into three main sections: Trinity College, Duke University, and Duke University Unprocessed Materials. The Trinity College series begins in 1860 and ends in 1924, the year Trinity College became Duke University. There are minute books, topical files, and yearly files. Because a fire destroyed the minute book covering June 1901-June 1910, some handwritten minutes have been transcribed; these can be found in the yearly files.

The second series, Duke University, covers 1924 to the present. It includes minutes of the Board and the Executive Committee, general records of the Board and the Executive Committee, reports, financial records, committees, and unprocessed materials. All materials less than 50 years old are closed except by special permission, in writing, from the Board of Trustees.

The third series, Duke University Unprocessed Materials, consists primarily of materials less than fifty years old, and so are restricted except by permission from the Board of Trustees.

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John Franklin Heitman papers, 1863 - 1911 2.6 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

John Franklin Heitman (1840-1904) was professor of Trinity College in Randolph County from 1883 to 1892, and Acting President of the school from 1884-1887. He later served as Headmaster of Trinity High School from 1892 to 1895. He also published several periodicals during his career. The John Franklin Heitman Papers contain correspondence, bound volumes, printed material, and financial and legal documents. Topics include college finance, the U.S. Government's sponsorship of education for Cherokee Indians, the Civil War, publications such as the North Carolina Education Journal and the North Carolina Home Journal, Trinity College administrative issues, and Trinity High School administrative issues. Major correspondents include Julian S. Carr and John W. Alspaugh. English.

The John Franklin Heitman Papers contain correspondence, bound volumes, printed material, and financial and legal documents. Much of the material dates from the 1884-1887 period in which Heitman served as Acting President of Trinity College. Topics include college finance, the U.S. Government's sponsorship of education for Cherokee Indians, the Civil War, publications, Trinity College administrative issues, and Trinity High School administrative issues. Major correspondents include Julian S. Carr and John W. Alspaugh.

This collection is arranged into two series. The first, Correspondence, dates from 1863 to 1894, with one letter from 1911. It includes both personal and professional correspondence, and is arranged chronologically. The second series, Bound Volumes and Other Material, includes a Civil War diary, grade books from Trinity High School, financial and legal documents related to Trinity College, and publications edited by Heitman, as well as a sampling of other types of print materials. This series is arranged alphabetically by topic.

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John W. Alspaugh papers, 1875 - 1898 0.25 Linear Feet — 100 Items

John Wesley Alspaugh was a lawyer, editor, and civic leader in Winston-Salem, N.C. A key supporter of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C), he served as chairman of the Board of Trustees and as a member of the Committee of Management, which ran the school from 1884 to 1887. Papers contain letters from J. S. Carr and J. A. Gray concerning the uncertain financial state of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). Also included are claims, letters of recommendation, a student petition regarding food vendors, and reports of the Committee of Management. English.

The John W. Alspaugh Papers contain letters from J. S. Carr and J. A. Gray concerning the uncertain financial state of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). Also included are claims, letters of recommendation, a student petition regarding food vendors, and reports of the Committee of Management.

The letters of the other two members of the Committee of Management, Julian S. Carr and James A. Gray, concern the finances of Trinity during the critical struggle for the institution's survival, when many pledges to an endowment fund were unpaid. Notes signed by the Committee of Management had to be met, speakers approved, scholarships considered, teachers employed, insurance paid, meetings arranged, and reports prepared, among other business.

In 1886, the question of employing Dr. John B. Bobbitt as collection agent for Trinity was debated. The quest for funds was hampered by the impossibility of collecting a loan to Charles L. Heitman. Meanwhile, the executor of the estate of Braxton Craven was pressing for settlement of debts owed by the college.

With the arrival of President John Franklin Crowell in 1887, the Alspaugh correspondence diminishes, although he remained as chairman of the Board of Trustees for many years. Still haunting the Trustees was the debt against Mrs. Craven for the college bells. John B. Bobbitt was trying to secure payment for his services as a collector of notes pledged to Trinity. In 1889, S. L. Leary of Charlotte, N.C. offered his services as an architect for the new buildings needed when the college considered moving to Raleigh, N.C.

Two broadsides, dated 1884 and 1886, contain reports of the Committee of Management of Trinity College. Also included is the annual report made by Chairman of the Faculty William H. Pegram to the President and Board of Trustees of Trinity College.