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The Duke University Board of Trustees has existed since 1924, and grew out of the Trinity College Board of Trustees that existed from 1859 to 1924. The Board is responsible for making major steering decisions in the administration of the school. The Board of Trustees records contain minutes, agendas, correspondence, reports, subject files, trustee handbooks, and other records of the Board and Executive, standing, and ad hoc committees. The minutes include reports, correspondence, resolutions, recommendations for the conferring of degrees, for employment and renewal of employment, and other material. Reports include those made by University officers, Board committees, and outside consultants. The Board's records also include statements of funds and scholarships, investment reports, correspondence, audits, bylaws, petitions from students, and other material. English.

The Board of Trustees records contain minutes, agendas, correspondence, reports, subject files, trustee handbooks, and other records of the Board and Executive, standing, and ad hoc committees. The minutes include reports, correspondence, resolutions, recommendations for the conferring of degrees, for employment and renewal of employment, and other material. Reports include those made by University officers, Board committees, and outside consultants. The Board's records also include statements of funds and scholarships, investment reports, correspondence, audits, bylaws, petitions from students, and other material. The minute book covering June 1901-June 1910 was destroyed by fire in 1911, but some handwritten minutes for the period were preserved and have been typed out. There are gaps in the minutes for the period 1925-1930.

The collection is divided into three main sections: Trinity College, Duke University, and Duke University Unprocessed Materials. The Trinity College series begins in 1860 and ends in 1924, the year Trinity College became Duke University. There are minute books, topical files, and yearly files. Because a fire destroyed the minute book covering June 1901-June 1910, some handwritten minutes have been transcribed; these can be found in the yearly files.

The second series, Duke University, covers 1924 to the present. It includes minutes of the Board and the Executive Committee, general records of the Board and the Executive Committee, reports, financial records, committees, and unprocessed materials. All materials less than 50 years old are closed except by special permission, in writing, from the Board of Trustees.

The third series, Duke University Unprocessed Materials, consists primarily of materials less than fifty years old, and so are restricted except by permission from the Board of Trustees.

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Brantley York was an educator, author, and Methodist clergyman in North Carolina. He organized Union Institute Academy at Brown's Schoolhouse in Randolph Co., N.C. in 1839, which would evolve into Normal College, Trinity College, and later Duke University. York also wrote an English grammar, as well as several other instructional textbooks. The Brantley York Records and Papers contain correspondence, a grade book, certificates, manuscripts, and published works. Modern materials were added to the collection; these include York family genealogical information, as well as clippings about York and his activities. Major subjects include the early history of Union Institute, Normal College, Trinity College and Duke University; education in North Carolina in the 19th century; and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. English.

The Brantley York Records and Papers include correspondence, clippings, a grade book, certificates, manuscripts, and published works. Modern materials were added to the collection; these include York family genealogical information, as well as clippings about York and his activities. Preservation photocopies of all deteriorating clippings have been made for patron use.

The first series, Brantley York papers, includes certificates and other documents, a small amount of correspondence, and a grade book. The second series, Writings, features manuscript drafts and a published copy of York's autobiography, as well as copies of three of his instructional texts. The final series contains both contemporary and modern clippings about Brantley York's life, work, and family members. Also included in this series is a York family genealogy.

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John Franklin Crowell was an educator, economist, and journalist. He served as President of Trinity College (Randolph County, and Durham, N.C.) from 1887-1894. The John Franklin Crowell Records and Papers primarily consist of materials concerning Crowell's research interests and publications; his presidency of Trinity College; and his activities after leaving Trinity. The collection includes correspondence, reprints, manuscripts, memoranda, scrapbooks, photographs, printed matter, account books, cash books, and grade books. Materials range in date from 1883 to 1932. English.

The collection includes correspondence, reprints, manuscripts, memoranda, scrapbooks, photographs, printed matter, account books, cash books, and grade books. The correspondence includes letters about the relocation of Trinity from Randolph County to Durham and Crowell's vision for Trinity College. Research and writings include research notes, reprints, manuscripts, photographs, and memorandum books. The memorandum books include notes on a variety of subjects including NY tenements, economic and financial subjects, and personal notes. Scrapbooks include printed matter concerning Trinity College, newspaper clippings on commodity markets, and shipping reports. The printed matter consists of clippings, flyers, newspapers, announcements, and other material pertaining to Crowell's interests. The account books, cash books, and grade books are part of the Trinity College Records, and give details about college life. Major subjects of the collection include Crowell's presidency of Trinity College (Randolph County, and Durham, N. C.); his research interests and publications; and activities after leaving Trinity.

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John W. Alspaugh papers, 1875 - 1898 0.25 Linear Feet — 100 Items

John Wesley Alspaugh was a lawyer, editor, and civic leader in Winston-Salem, N.C. A key supporter of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C), he served as chairman of the Board of Trustees and as a member of the Committee of Management, which ran the school from 1884 to 1887. Papers contain letters from J. S. Carr and J. A. Gray concerning the uncertain financial state of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). Also included are claims, letters of recommendation, a student petition regarding food vendors, and reports of the Committee of Management. English.

The John W. Alspaugh Papers contain letters from J. S. Carr and J. A. Gray concerning the uncertain financial state of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.). Also included are claims, letters of recommendation, a student petition regarding food vendors, and reports of the Committee of Management.

The letters of the other two members of the Committee of Management, Julian S. Carr and James A. Gray, concern the finances of Trinity during the critical struggle for the institution's survival, when many pledges to an endowment fund were unpaid. Notes signed by the Committee of Management had to be met, speakers approved, scholarships considered, teachers employed, insurance paid, meetings arranged, and reports prepared, among other business.

In 1886, the question of employing Dr. John B. Bobbitt as collection agent for Trinity was debated. The quest for funds was hampered by the impossibility of collecting a loan to Charles L. Heitman. Meanwhile, the executor of the estate of Braxton Craven was pressing for settlement of debts owed by the college.

With the arrival of President John Franklin Crowell in 1887, the Alspaugh correspondence diminishes, although he remained as chairman of the Board of Trustees for many years. Still haunting the Trustees was the debt against Mrs. Craven for the college bells. John B. Bobbitt was trying to secure payment for his services as a collector of notes pledged to Trinity. In 1889, S. L. Leary of Charlotte, N.C. offered his services as an architect for the new buildings needed when the college considered moving to Raleigh, N.C.

Two broadsides, dated 1884 and 1886, contain reports of the Committee of Management of Trinity College. Also included is the annual report made by Chairman of the Faculty William H. Pegram to the President and Board of Trustees of Trinity College.

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Marquis Lafayette Wood was a Methodist clergyman, missionary, and educator. He served as President of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.) from 1883 to 1884. The Marquis Lafayette Wood Records and Papers primarily consist of diaries, sermons and addresses, with a small amount of correspondence, minutes, account books, and writings. Modern materials, such as Wood family genealogies and biographies, were added to the collection as well. Major subjects of the collection include Trinity College during the mid 1880s and Wood's career as a minister in North Carolina and as a missionary in China during the early 1860s. Materials range in date from 1852-1984 (bulk 1855-1892). English.

The papers of Marquis Lafayette Wood form part of the records of the President of Duke University. Wood's papers span the years 1852-1984, with the bulk occurring between 1855 and 1892. Included are diaries, correspondence, minutes, account books, writings, sermons and addresses, and other materials. The materials are useful for the study of Trinity College during the mid 1880s. Minutes from the college trustee meetings held in 1883-1884, accounts, and correspondence form the official records of Wood's presidency. Letters concerning the federal support and enrollment of Cherokee Indians at Trinity are of particular interest. Wood's diaries from 1883 and 1884 provide limited information on Trinity College.

Wood's ministerial career is the major subject documented in the collection. The diaries span the years 1856-1885; sermons correspondence, and miscellaneous volumes supplement the account of Wood's service that is reflected in the diaries. Diary entries portray Wood's life as an itinerant pastor, missionary, and presiding elder in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The papers portray Wood's life as well as provide information on a number of western North Carolina churches, including those in the Salisbury District, Iredell District, Surry Circuit, the Greensboro District, and the Charlotte District.

Of particular significance are the diaries and letters that date from 1860 to 1866, the years Wood served in China. Beginning in 1859, the diaries relate Wood's voyage to China, his observations on life and customs in China, and his views of the Chinese. Ellen (Morphis), Wood's wife, became ill while in China and died. Wood noted both her symptoms and attempted treatments in his diary. The diaries from the period also reflect Wood's observations on the Tai-Ping Rebellion. Other papers concerning Wood's service in China include synopses of letters Wood wrote to E.W. Sehon of the Missionary Society of the Episcopal Church, South.

In addition to serving as minister, Wood was interested in the history of North Carolina Methodism. Wood collected and penned accounts of early western North Carolina churches and ministers. His manuscripts on Sunday School work in the Fayetteville District and the rise of Methodism in the Yadkin Valley are among the extant notes, letters, and volumes.

Other figures and subjects reflected in the papers include Charles Force Deems, Methodist minister, Wood family genealogy, and Wood's lifelong loyalty to Trinity College. An address by Wood to the Trinity College alumni association is present.

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W. H. Pegram papers, 1876 - 1928 1.75 Linear Feet — 1700 Items

William Howell Pegram (1846-1928) was a student, professor, and administrator at Trinity College (N.C.). He moved with the school from Randolph County to Durham County (N.C.), and remained active as Trinity College evolved into Duke University. The W.H. Pegram Papers include correspondence, notebooks, writings, clippings, and other material. His relationship with Braxton Craven, both professionally and personally, is detailed. Among the subjects in the collection are Pegram's main academic interest, chemistry, and the administration of Trinity College in both Randolph and Durham counties. English.

The W. H. Pegram Collection includes correspondence, notebooks, writings, clippings, and other material related to Pegram's career at Trinity College and later Duke University. The first series, Personal, is a brief series containing clippings and other material regarding Pegram's career and his death in 1928. The second series Correspondence, contains letters to and from Pegram, mainly regarding administrative issues at Trinity College. There are also some letters of thanks from former students. This series is arranged chronologically. The third series is Notebooks, and contains notebooks used by Pegram for a variety of purposes: to record the attendance and grades of his students, to prepare Sunday school lessons, to work on chemistry problems, and to write essays. The notebooks are arranged by title or subject, when available, then date. The fourth series, Writings, contains several essays prepared by Pegram, as well as shorter pieces. This series is also organized by title, when available, and then date. The last series, Trinity College, contains a variety of materials related to the history of the school. These materials are not all directly related to Pegram, but they provide a historical context for his other materials. It contains clippings, articles, financial papers, and print materials about the school. These papers are organized alphabetically.

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William Preston Few (1867-1940) served as President of Trinity College from 1910-1924, and President of Duke University from 1924-1940. Few came to Trinity College in 1896 as Professor of English, was named Dean of the College in 1902, and President in 1910, succeeding John C. Kilgo. Few worked with James Buchanan Duke to establish the Duke Endowment. In 1924, Few directed Trinity College's transition to Duke University and remained as President of Duke University until his death in 1940. Few was an active layman in the Methodist Church and in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The William Preston Few Records and Papers contain correspondence from Few's office files as President of Trinity College and Duke University, reports, clippings, copies of speeches and manuscripts, memorandum books, bound volumes, index cards that catalog Few's office files, and other types of printed material. Major subjects include education; philanthropy; the development of Trinity College from its beginning in Randolph County, N.C., to Duke University; the development of the Duke Endowment; Trinity and Duke departmental operations; the school's relationship with the Methodist Church; and business of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. English.

The William Preston Few Records and Papers contain correspondence from Few's office files as President of Trinity College and Duke University, reports, clippings, copies of speeches and manuscripts, memorandum books, bound volumes, index cards that catalog Few's office files, and other types of printed material. The files are arranged in six series. They include: Correspondence, Subject Files, Bound Volumes, Oversize Materials, Index Cards to Few Papers, and Additions.

Major subjects include education; philanthropy; the development of Trinity College, from its beginning in Randolph County, N.C., to Duke University; the development of the Duke Endowment; Trinity and Duke departmental operations; the school's relationship with the Methodist Church; and business of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

The Correspondence makes up a large part of the collection. The bulk of this correspondence is from Few's office files as President of Trinity College and Duke University. The correspondence includes incoming letters to Few's office, copies of outgoing letters, reports, minutes, telegrams, newsletters, and other materials generated or received by the President's office. Among the correspondents are: William Hayes Ackland, Alice Mary Baldwin, John Spencer Bassett, Julian S. Carr, Robert D.W. Conner, Angier Buchanan Duke, Benjamin Newton Duke, James Buchanan Duke, John Carlisle Kilgo, and Edward R. Murrow. There is also some personal correspondence dating from 1885.

The Subject Files include a wide variety of materials collected by Few's office. They include correspondence, reports, clippings and other types of printed material. Major subjects include education; philanthropy; the development of Trinity College from its beginning in Randolph County, N.C., to Duke University; the development of the Duke Endowment; Trinity and Duke departmental operations; the school's relationship with the Methodist Church; and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Included are Few's speeches made at university functions, to community groups, and at funerals. There are a number of speeches that give Few's opinions about education and the development of Duke University while he was President.

The Bound Volumes include a manuscript arithmetic primer, dated 1814, written by Alston W. Kendrick, Few's grandfather; a trigonometry textbook used by Few; a Bible; class records, 1913-1929 and undated; an incomplete set of Few's memoranda books for the years 1922-1933; and several alumni reviews.

The Index Cards to Few's Papers were apparently created by Few's office and catalog the holdings in the office files. However, not all of the materials or names referenced on the index cards can be found in the William Preston Few Records and Papers.

The Oversize Materials include folders removed from the subject files, diplomas, and a bound volume. The Additions include some correspondence, and obituaries for Mrs. William Preston Few (Mary Reamey Thomas Few), that were incorporated into the collection after it was transferred to University Archives.

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William Gannaway was a Professor of Latin and History at Trinity College in Randolph County from 1857 until his retirement in 1892. The collection includes account books and grade books as well as a small amount of correspondence and notes. The material ranges in date from 1853-1906.

The collection largely includes grade books and account books. These consist of personal account books (Gannaway, like many other teachers, was also a working farmer) and college account books. They have not been separated. The is a report to the Trustees from 1864 as well as miscellaneous memoranda, receipts, financial records and notes, and a small amount of correspondence, including a letter from E. F. Finch in 1888 that concerns the financial affairs of Charles Heitman and their effects on Trinity College. The material ranges in date from 1853-1906.