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Collection consists of 60 small black-and-white photographs dating roughly from the 1930s to the 1950s, belonging to Amy Ashwood Garvey, feminist and activist who traveled extensively and lived in West Africa, where most if not all of these images originated. The majority of the images are portraits of Amy Ashwood Garvey's many male and female acquaintances in Africa, who include female friends, politicians, heads of states, lawyers, and students. Other subjects include locales and native inhabitants of Nigeria and other unidentified places; gatherings such as meetings, a funeral, and a public hanging; and street and market scenes. Although there are photographs with inscriptions, names, and descriptions of the scenes, the majority are unlabeled; the few dates that appear are from the late 1940s. The travel snapshots are likely to have been taken by Amy Ashwood Garvey, but there are images that were sent to her by individuals as mementos, and some images of her taken by another unidentified person. Acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Dating roughly from the 1930s to the 1950s, this collection of 60 small black-and-white photographs belonged to Amy Ashwood Garvey, feminist, activist for African and African American human rights, and first wife of Marcus Garvey. Most of the travel snapshots were likely to have been taken by her, but there are several that were clearly sent to her by individuals, and some that feature Amy Ashwood Garvey and were taken by another person. Although there are some photographs with inscriptions, names, and descriptions of the scenes, most are unlabeled; the few dates that appear are from the late 1940s.

Almost if not all the photographs were taken in Africa, where Garvey traveled and lived after her divorce with Marcus Garvey in 1922. Other locations may include Ghana and Benin. Personal subjects include portraits, candid and formal, of the many male and female friends and acquaintances of Amy Ashwood Garvey, including politicians and heads of state; and native inhabitants, including a portrait of a tribal chief with two women, probably his wives. Most are in Western dress, but some are in traditional clothing. Amy Ashwood Garvey appears in at least three of the prints, and there is a portrait of the President of Liberia, William Tubman, with whom she had a serious long-term relationship. Other images include street and market scenes; school groups; a parade, meetings and ceremonial visits; a public hanging; a funeral gathering; and views of river landings, probably the River Niger.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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George Way Harley papers, 1911-1975 5 Linear Feet — 2,500 Items

The papers of George Way Harley span the years 1911 to 1975 though the bulk of them are from 1925 to 1960. The papers relate principally to the life and work of George W. and Winifred J. Harley at the mission they founded and supervised at Ganta, Liberia and include diaries and journals, correspondence, writings and notes, miscellaneous personal and subject files, account books, notebooks, scrapbooks, albums, photographs, printed materials, clippings, diplomas, certificates, memorabilia, and other papers.

Shortly after George W. Harley graduated from Trinity College (later Duke University) in 1916, he went to Yale to attend medical school, where he met his future wife, Winifred Frances Jewell. Responding to calls to mission work heard at the First Methodist Church in New Haven, and after receiving his M.D. in 1923, Harley and his wife left the U.S. under the auspices of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church. After a short time studying in London, they were sent to Ganta, in the Liberian interior, where they established a medical mission and industrial school.

During the next 35 years spent at Ganta Mission, Dr. Harley built a medical dispensary, hospital, church, school, several residences and shops, as well as a leper village and two "sick villages." In addition to his medical work, Dr. Harley was also very involved and interested in the industrial training and teaching of the local Liberian people, as well as local anthropology, art, native medicine, mapping, meteorology, and other scientific interests. On his death in 1966, Liberia declared a national day of mourning and President William V.S. Tubman issued a proclamation praising the long service of Dr. Harley on behalf of Liberia and its people.

The correspondence of George W. and Winifred J. Harley forms the largest portion of these papers. Included are many letters to members of their respective families (letters from family members being notably absent) detailing the daily life and struggles of mission work as well as more official correspondence with the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church and scholarly correspondence relating to Dr. Harley's scientific work, particularly his relationship with the Peabody Museum of Harvard University in conducting anthropological field work and collecting botanical and entomological specimens. Also included in the correspondence are letters reflecting in a general way on the impact of World War II in Liberia and the operations of the plantations of the Firestone Rubber Company.

The writings found in these papers consist of holograph and typewritten drafts and notes on a variety of subjects. Included are articles of both popular and scholarly interest focusing, not surprisingly, on various aspects of Harley's experience and work at the mission and in Liberia. Of particular note are a copy of Harley's 1938 Ph.D. dissertation, Native African Medicine and two drafts of Mrs. Harley's memoirs of her life with George Harley.

The Miscellany files in these papers consist of notes, minutes, printed and near-print material, and other papers relating to a particular subject, such as Dr. Harley's participation in the work of the Advisory Council on Health of the Republic of Liberia or his work with the Foreign Economic Administration. Also included are Dr. Harley's notes in his research on trypanosomiasis ("sleeping sickness"), biographical and personal files on Dr. and Mrs. Harley, rainfall statistics, notes on the Mano language, and miscellaneous notes and papers relating to the Liberian timber and mining industries.

Rounding out the papers are a series of account books and notebooks, relating primarily to personal and mission finances; clippings and printed matter relating to the Harleys in particular and to Liberia in general; scrapbooks and photo albums, the latter focused principally on the Harley's post-retirement years; and a series of certificates, awards, and diplomas.

Correspondents of note include Thomas Smith Donohugh, E. A. Hooton, George Schwab, and William V. S. Tubman.

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Photojournalist, diplomat, and film maker from Atlanta, Georgia. Collection dates from 1949-1991 and comprises films, photographs, nitrate negatives, contact prints and related materials assembled by African American photojournalist Griff Davis, relating to Davis's trips to Liberia; prominent African American writers, poets, or artists such as Langston Hughes, Hale Woodruff, and Charles Alston; and the Palmer Memorial Institute, a private junior and senior high school for African Americans in Sedalia, N.C. The audiovisual components include home movies and nine color and black-and-white 16mm films dating from the fifties, taken in Liberia by Davis during part of William V.S. Tubman's presidency. Films depict a wide range of subjects, including the country's people, industry, leaders, and rural life. Other Griff Davis images in the collection are found in an album entitled "Progress in Liberia, November 1949 - February 1950," containing twenty large black-and-white gelatin silver prints with typed captions; the album was assembled to promote a partnership between the government of Liberia and Liberia Mining Company. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Griffith J. Davis Photographs and Films collection dates from 1949-1991 and comprises films, photographs, nitrate negatives, contact prints, and related materials relating to Davis's trips to Liberia; prominent African American writers, poets, or artists such as Langston Hughes, Hale Woodruff, and Charles Alston; and the Palmer Memorial Institute, a private junior and senior high school for African Americans in Sedalia, N.C.

Photographic materials include two sheets of photographic contact prints taken by Davis when he visited Methodist missionaries Mr. and Mrs. George Way Harley in Ganta, Liberia. Subjects include African masks and the Ganta Mission. A letter written by Davis describes his visit with the Harleys. Other Griff Davis images in the collection are found in an album entitled "Progress in Liberia, November 1949 - February 1950," containing a map of Liberia and twenty large black-and-white gelatin silver prints with typed captions. Subjects feature Liberian landscapes, construction projects, bridges, railroads, and port scenes, with some images featuring native Liberian workers. The album was assembled to promote the partnership with the Liberian government and the Liberia Mining Company; in the first image, President Tubman is signing a contract with mining officials. There are also nitrate negatives in the collection that are closed to public use.

The audiovisual components include seven color and black-and-white films across ten reels, taken in Liberia by Davis in the 1950s during William V.S. Tubman's presidency. Davis was asked by Tubman to take films of Liberia in 1952. In 1956 and 1957 he made films while stationed in Liberia with the United States technical assistance mission and the Liberian Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. Films depict a wide range of subjects, activities and events, including the country's people, industry, leaders, and rural life. Titles include Pepper Bird Land (1952), Liberia 1956 Presidential Inauguration of William V. S. Tubman & William R. Tolbert, President and the Press Exhibit (1956), Gold Coast Prime Minister Kwame Nkrumah Visits Liberia (1953), Progress Through Cooperation (1957), home movie Coketails for Dorothy, Monrovia Children's Birthday Party (1956), and Night Village Dancing in Liberia (1956).

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.