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Edwin Lee Jones papers, 1908-1981 and undated 4.4 Linear Feet — 3,268 Items

Official observer of the atomic bomb test in Bikini, Marshall Islands, July 1, 1946. Former secretary-general, general manager, president, and chairman of the board of J. A. Jones Construction Co. of Charlotte, N.C. Consists of correspondence, addresses and writings, legal and financial papers, clippings, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, diaries, and scrapbooks related to Edwin Lee Jones and members of his family, including his father, daughter, son, wife, and brothers. Topics include the activities of the J. A. Jones Construction Company, Duke University student life, the Methodist Church, the Marshall Islands atom bomb tests, ship-building in WWII, and the military career of Edwin's son in the Marine Corps on Parris Island, SC, and in other schools in the South. Although most of the pictures are of the Jones family, there are also photographs relating to an awards ceremony held in honor of J. A. Jones Construction Co.'s prodigious production of "liberty ships" during WWII. The writings and addresses and printed materials document Jones's activities with various religious and philanthropic organizations, while the volumes include a travel journal, as well as several scrapbooks and ledgers recording Jones's personal expenditures from 1918 to 1959. Numerous legal and financial papers pertain to the settling of Jones's estate following his death in 1971. Addition includes letters (5 items; dated 1946) written by Jones describing the preparations for the atomic bomb test and the effects of the explosions on Bikini and Kwajalein atolls.

Consists of correspondence, addresses and writings, legal and financial papers, clippings, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, scrapbooks, and diaries pertaining to Edwin Lee Jones and his family. Many letters were written by Jones's daughter Louise as a student at Duke University, the Three Arts Club, and a New York City fashion school, and also as the wife of U.S. Army officer Franklin Brown in Oak Ridge, Tenn. There are even more letters from Jones's son Edwin as a youth at Camp Carolina in Brevard N.C., as a student at McCallie Prep School in Chattanooga, Tenn., at West Point, and at Duke University. His letters also document his military career as a Marine Corps recruit at Parris Island, S.C., an officer candidate in Quantico, Va, and an officer in the Pacific during WWII, including duty in Japan. These letters often reflect his stuggle to maintain a Christian lifestyle.

Other correspondents include Jones's father, J. A. Jones; his brothers, James A. Jones and Raymond A. Jones, both of whom were involved in the family business; his wife Annabel; and others, especially Dilworth M.E. Church of Charlotte. Jones's return correspondence describes his involvement in the Methodist Church, and his activities on behalf of the J. A. Jones Construction Co., much of which involved U.S. military bases and projects in Central and South America. Also present are Jones's descriptive letters to his wife Annabel concerning preparations for, as well as consequences of, the atom bomb test of 1946 near Bikini Atoll in the South Pacific. Additional materials concerning the test can be found among the miscellaneous papers and pictures.

Although most of the pictures in the Photographs Series are of the Jones family, there are also pictures relating to an awards ceremony held in honor of J. A. Jones Construction Co.'s prodigious production of "liberty ships" during WWII.

The writings and addresses and printed materials document Jones's activities with various religious and philanthropic organizations, while the volumes include a travel journal, as well as several scrapbooks and ledgers recording Jones's personal expenditures from 1918 to 1959. Numerous legal and financial papers pertain to the settling of Jones's estate following his death in 1971.

Addition includes letters (5 items; dated 1946) written by Jones describing the preparations for the atomic bomb test and the effects of the explosions on Bikini and Kwajalein atolls.

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Evelyn Byrd Robinson papers, 1785-1940 2 Linear Feet — 415 Items

Daughter of Dr. Clifford Cabell of Buckingham County, Va. Papers and correspondence of Evelyn Byrd (Cabell) Robinson, who married William Russell Robinson, resident of Nelson County, Va. There is also some material related to her two sons, Clifford Cabell Robinson and Wirt Robinson, who taught at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point for many years. Includes some genealogical material, writings by Evelyn Robinson, early legal papers, and an obituary of Wirt Robinson. The correspondence is chiefly of a personal nature, and the bulk of it dates from after the Civil War.

Collection includes papers and correspondence of Evelyn Byrd (Cabell) Robinson, who married William Russell Robinson, resident of Nelson County, Va. There is also some material related to her two sons, Clifford Cabell Robinson and Wirt Robinson, who taught at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point for many years. Includes some genealogical material, writings by Evelyn Robinson, early legal papers, and an obituary of Wirt Robinson. The correspondence is chiefly of a personal nature, and the bulk of it dates from after the Civil War.

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Jacob Mordecai papers, 1784-1936 4 Linear Feet — 2558 Items

Educator, of Warrenton, N.C., and Richmond, Va. Collection (2474 items; dated 1784-1936, bulk 1784-1904) comprises correspondence, ledgers, personal and school accounts (1811-1818), personal journals (1858-1861), and other papers of Mordecai and of his family. The material concerns schools and teaching in Warrenton, N.C., Mobile, Ala., and New York; life in Mobile (1823-1860), and at the U. S. Military Academy (1819-1823); literature of the day and social life and customs; Samuel Mordecai's book, Richmond in by-gone days; and personal matters. Correspondents include Rachel Mordecai Lazarus, Alfred Mordecai, Ellen Mordecai, Isabel R. Mordecai, Samuel Mordecai, Samuel Fox Mordecai, Achille Plunkett, and Carolina Mordecai Plunkett.

Collection contains personal correspondence and papers of Jacob Mordecai (1762-1838), educator and progenitor of a family long prominent in North Carolina and Virginia; and of his children and grandchildren. The majority of the letters are of a personal nature, but they include several important series of letters, as follows: copies of letters from Rachel (Mordecai) Lazarus (1788-1838) to Maria Edgeworth, beginning in 1816; of Ellen Mordecai (1790-1884) to her brother, Solomon Mordecai (1792-1869), while he was a medical student at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and later as a physician in Mobile, Alabama; of Ellen Mordecai, regarding her long tenure as a teacher in her father's school at Warrenton, North Carolina, and later as a governess in New York City, 1848-1852; of Caroline (Mordecai) Plunkett (1794-1862) and her husband, Achilles Plunkett (d. 1824), while they conducted a school at Warrenton, North Carolina, and of her later life as a teacher in Mobile; and of Alfred Mordecai (1804-1887) to members of his family while a student at the U. S. Military Academy, West Point, New York, 1819-1823. The correspondence contains frequent comment on literature of the day, information on social life and customs in general, and especially in Warrenton and Richmond, and life in Mobile, 1823-1860.

Letters of Samuel Mordecai (1786-1865) refer in part to his writing of Richmond in By-Gone Days (Richmond: 1856), and to land in Wisconsin sold for taxes. There are letters from 1810-1812 describing the Richmond theater, its actors, performances, and scenery, both the old theater, which burned down in a famous conflagration in 1811, and the new theater that replaced it. Included also are Jacob Mordecai's ledger containing personal and school accounts, 1811-1818; Samuel Mordecai and Company's ledger, 1839-1865, Petersburg, Virginia; and Isabel R. Mordecai's journals, 1858-1861, Charleston, S.C. There is also a secretary's report of the Sick Soldiers Relief Society, Raleigh, North Carolina, October 1, 1861; a description by Marshall De Lancey Haywood of the Mordecai residence in Raleigh with related correspondence of Pattie Mordecai, 1936; correspondence of Emma Mordecai, daughter of Jacob, with relatives and friends, including Solomon Cohen, an attorney of Savannah, describing European travel, and with Sally Vaughn Norral, a former slave; and bills, receipts, and bank statements of various family members.

Addition (1986) (84 items, dated 1805-1881) contains correspondence (1805-1838 and 1869-1875), most of which is personal, to and from various family members. Some of the letters provide insight into Mordecai's life as a boarding school student in Oxford, N.C., and later as a student at the University of Virginia. Also includes essays by Samuel F. Mordecai and two manuscripts by Moses Mordecai.

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North Carolina family active in education, law enforcement, farming, and slavery. The bulk of the papers relate to Nathan Carter Newbold and his relatives, including his father William A. Newbold and grandfather William Newbold (Sheriff of Pasquotank County, North Carolina), his first wife Mabel Wooten, and his second wife Eugenia Bradsher. Nathan Carter Newbold was the Director of the Division of Negro Education for the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction from 1913-1950. The collection includes personal and professional correspondence, photographs, financial and property records dating from the 1840s, and recorded speeches given at Nathan Carter Newbold's retirement dinner. Some photographs have been identified as being of South Carolina during the late 19th century-early 20th century, which include portraits, street scenes (in Charleston), sail boats, as well as a few photographs of people of color, including photographs of "Lascar Sailors."Some photographs are of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point during the 1890s. Many of the legal and financial papers were generated by Nathan Carter Newbold's father and grandfather. The bulk of the correspondence relates to Nathan Carter Newbold's role as an administrator for North Carolina public schools and to his tenure as the Director of the Division of Negro Education during segregation and Jim Crow.

Personal and professional papers of Nathan Carter Newbold and his relatives, including his father William A. Newbold and grandfather William Newbold (Sheriff of Pasquotank County, North Carolina), his first wife Mabel Wooten, and his second wife Eugenia Bradsher. The collection includes personal and professional correspondence, photographs, financial and property records dating from the 1840s, and recorded speeches given at Nathan Carter Newbold's retirement dinner. Some photographs have been identified as being of South Carolina during the late 19th century-early 20th century, which include portraits, street scenes (in Charleston), sail boats, as well as a few photographs of people of color, including photographs of "Lascar Sailors."Some photographs are of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point during the 1890s. Many of the legal and financial papers were generated by Nathan Carter Newbold's father and grandfather. The bulk of the correspondence relates to Nathan Carter Newbold's role as an administrator for North Carolina public schools and to his tenure as the Director of the Division of Negro Education during segregation and Jim Crow.