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Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers. The photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or from Korea. The images depict soldiers at work and enjoying recreational time. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Collection includes an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs carefully arranged and mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers inlaid with mother-of-pearl. Photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or Korea, as the latter was strongly influenced by Japanese culture until the end of World War II.

The images depict soldiers in and out of uniform and often engaged in recreational pursuits. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Included with the album is an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Collection comprises a large photograph album likely created by an African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards. Images primarily feature informal shots of African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, though few show the races mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. The photographer took many images of U.S. Army camps and air bases, army personnel and vehicles, street scenes from Saigon and smaller villages, and took numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas. Overall, the images offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a photograph album likely created by an unidentified African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards, all carefully arranged and mounted in a large decorative travel scrapbook.

Images primarily feature off-duty African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, although few show white and black soldiers mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. Scenes from the streets of Saigon and perhaps other large cities abound, showing the diversity of vehicles and pedestrians; there are also some taken in smaller, unidentified towns and villages, presumably in Vietnam. The photographer took many images of markets, bars, pharmacies, and other buildings, almost always from the exteriors, as well as numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children, often in groups, and some who appear to be frequently associated with the U.S. military base or camp.

Military locations and scenes include an air base, helicopters in flight, a crashed helicopter, military bases and personnel, Army vehicles along the roads, military police (including one African American), and what appear to be checkpoints. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas.

Overall, the images in this photograph album offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Collection comprises a 16-page 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, a segregated unit of African American soldiers stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a major supply route from India to China. Mounted on loose pages, the 44 black-and-white snapshots include posed and candid images of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work and at rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, and a large Stilwell Road sign, along with various shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a 16-page, 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, one of at least four segregated units of African American soldiers active, stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a military supply route from Ledo in Assam, India, through Burma, to Kunming, China.

The album's original binder is no longer present. Mounted on the loose pages are 44 black-and-white snapshot photographs, most measuring 3 x 4 1/2 inches, some with brief captions in ink. The images include posed and candid snapshots of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work on the base and during periods of rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, a large Stilwell Road sign, along with varied shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. There are a number of blank pages, and there are some photographs missing.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Small bound album holding 34 black-and-white snapshots and one photographic postcard. The photographs document a close-knit group of African American soldiers of the U.S. Army's 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company in Munich, Germany, August 1945, during the last weeks of World War II. The snapshots are of individuals and groups in uniform, in casual settings; scenes include the men standing in line at mealtime, enjoying leisure time in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, and standing in front of a bombed-out building in Munich. Most have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and some comments. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

Small photograph album (6x8 inches) housing 35 loosely mounted photographs of U.S. Army African American soldiers in Munich, Germany, August 1945. Comprises 34 black-and-white snapshots measuring approximately 2 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches, and one black-and-white photographic postcard portrait (3x5 inches) of a Corporal Jack Taylor, to whom the album may have belonged. The caption on the back of the postcard bears the name of the 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company. The only dates in the album are found on one page and refer to August 16-19th, 1945, but the other photographs may have been taken before or after this period.

The snapshots are of individuals and groups, and chiefly show the men enjoying some leisure time during the last months of World War II. Most of the images have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and commentary. Scenes include the men posing in their bathing suits in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, standing in front of a bombed-out building (the only city scene), and waiting in line at mealtime. Among the last names are: Sergeant Carney, Sergeant Riley, Sergeant Ousley, "McKnight," Louis Allen, Sergeant Edward Johnson and Private Robert Johnson ("the fat boys"), First Sergeant Brown, "Mule" Crawford, Homer Magee, "Blind" Knight, J. Martin, Jenkins ("the jive man from New Jersey"), and Corporal Jack Taylor.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

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Henry Heyliger photograph album of occupied Japan, 1947 .3 Linear Feet — 1 box — 3 items

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Collection comprises an accordion-bound photograph album containing 158 black-and-white and a few color photographs, belonging to African American soldier Henry Heyliger, named numerous times in the album. Most of the photographs document the 610th Port Company based in Yokohama, Japan, 1947, and many are labeled with soldier's names and some locations. In addition to a few formal portraits, there are many snapshots showing African American soldiers marching, working at the base, relaxing, and posing with Japanese women. One image shows a few U.S. soldiers, including Heyliger, visiting and eating with the family household of a young Japanese man, possibly a worker at the base. A large group photograph shows 18 members of the 120th Tng (Training?) Company and Regiment. There are two U.S. photographs, showing African Americans enjoying Hamid Pier beach in Atlantic City, and an Atlantic City postcard. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises a 9 1/4 x 13 inch accordion-bound album containing 158 black-and-white and a few color photographs, belonging to African American soldier Henry Heyliger. His name is found in the album in photograph captions, in an inscription to him on another soldier's portrait, and on a postcard addressed to him.

Most of the photographs document the 610th Port Company based in Yokohama, Japan, 1947, and many are labeled with soldier's names and some locations. In addition to formal portraits, there are many snapshots showing the men around base, marching, working, relaxing, and posing with Japanese women. One image shows a few U.S. soldiers, including Heyliger, visiting and eating with the family household of a young Japanese man, possibly a worker at the base. A large group photograph shows 18 members of the 120th Tng (Training?) Company and Regiment. Also found laid in is a newspaper clipping. A few of the pages are separated from the original bindings.

Included in the album are two snapshots taken in the U.S., showing African Americans enjoying Hamid Pier beach in Atlantic City, as well as an Atlantic City color postcard addressed to Henry Heyliger at a military base in San Francisco (crossed out, with Los Angeles military address added), from "Doris," who is probably the Doris Hensley in a photograph mounted on the same page as a larger color hand-tinted) photograph of Henry Heyliger.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Houston Riot of 1917 trial photograph, 1917 1.2 linear ft. Linear Feet — 1 item

W. C. Lloyd was a photographer. Collection comprises a gelatin silver photograph taken during the trail at Fort Sam Houston following the Houston Riot of 1917 or Camp Logan riot. It shows 64 African-American members of the Army's 24th Infantry being court martialed for mutiny and the murder of 17 people during the riot. The photographer included description written onto the negative. The back is stamped with the Lloyd Photo Co. address.

Collection comprises a gelatin silver photograph taken during the trail at Fort Sam Houston following the Houston Riot of 1917 or Camp Logan riot. It shows 64 African-American members of the Army's 24th Infantry being court martialed for mutiny and the murder of 17 people during the riot. The photographer included description written onto the negative. The back is stamped with the Lloyd Photo Co. address. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Hypes family papers, 1700s-2010 4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 1 pamphlet binder — Approximately 2250 Items

Materials from the branch of the Hypes family that descended from Henry Hypes of Xenia, Ohio: Samuel Henry Hypes (1826-1916); his son, William Findlay Hypes; his grandson, Samuel Loomis Hypes; and his great-grandson, William P. Hypes. Collection includes a wide range of material from the Hypes family, particularly William Findlay Hypes, Samuel Loomis Hypes, and William P. Hypes. William Findlay Hypes' materials highlight his career at Marshall Fields and Co. of Chicago and his service as President of the Y.M.C.A. of Chicago, with emphasis on his family's world tour on behalf of the Y.M.C.A. in 1924-1925. Hundreds of postcards and photographs collected by the family are contained in the papers, including images from India, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), China, Europe, Egypt, and many more places, most unlabeled. Some material from Samuel Loomis Hypes' army service during World War I is also included, the most noteworthy being 24 black and white photographs featuring crowds awaiting the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the shipping of troops back to the United States, including photographs of African American soldiers. Materials from William P. Hypes relate to his work with the Y.M.C.A. in the mid-twentieth century. The family's research into their genealogy and family history, unidentified family photographs, and smaller amounts of correspondence and material from other family members are also included.

There is a wide range of material from the Hypes family's many generations present in this collection. Some early material exists from Henry Hypes, including an inventory of his property upon his death, and some correspondence from relatives. Other early materials include family photographs, which are largely unlabeled and undated but include formats such as tintypes, a daguerreotype, cartes de visite, negatives, and others.

The Hypes' attempts to reconstruct their family tree resulted in several letters between extended family members and distant cousins, as well as genealogical maps and notes, dating from the early to mid-twentieth century.

The majority of the collection dates from William Findlay Hypes and his family. W.F. Hypes' materials include correspondence and clippings about his career with Marshall Fields and Co., as well as news coverage of his world tour on behalf of the Y.M.C.A. from 1924 to 1925. The collection also contains photographic prints, negatives, and postcards from this trip, featuring images from India, China, Japan, Egypt, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Europe, and other unidentified places. The photographs are largely gelatin silver prints, and many have silvering. The majority of photographs are amateur shots presumably taken by the Hypes family. However, there are several sets of images which were clearly purchased by W.F. Hypes or other family members as travel souvenirs, including a set from India taken by H.R. Ferger and a set from Taormina, Italy. These all appear to date from the early 1900s. Many types of postcards are present, including real photo postcards and tinted color postcards. Several postcard books were purchased as souvenirs. Most postcards have been sorted by location; real photo postcards have also been sleeved to better protect the images. Real photo postcard locations include Norway, Manila, China, Japan, and a set from the Canadian Rockies.

An earlier trip to Europe and the Middle East by W.F. Hypes and his wife is described in letters between them and their daughter Muriel. This trip appears to have been taken in May and June, 1910. Since most of the collection's photographs are undated, some could date from this trip instead of the world tour trip from 1924-1925.

One part of the collection is closed to researchers: there is a small amount of nitrate and safety negatives. These appear to be taken by W.F. Hypes, and include family photographs, scenes from Jamaica, and scenes of a tiger hunt during the Hypes' Y.M.C.A. tour. The tiger hunt images are available as prints in the photographs portion of the materials. All negatives are closed to researchers.

Along with the extensive amount of photographs and postcards, W.F. Hypes' portion of the papers includes souvenir booklets and other collectibles from his travels. Also present are materials from the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893, including a set of tickets as well as a stock certificate. Hypes' political leanings can be inferred from a Republican National Convention ticket for the 1904 election, as well as a small, movable medal that spins and denounces William Jennings Bryan.

Another noteworthy part of the collection comes from Samuel Loomis Hypes, W.F. Hypes' son, who served as a captain in the U.S. Army's 803rd Pioneer Infantry during World War I. This portion of the papers contains 24 black-and-white photographs (18? June-19 July 1919) featuring crowds awaiting the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the shipping of troops back to the United States. Photographs often have captions in white ink. There are six crowd scenes in Paris and outside Versailles before and after the signing of the treaty. However, the majority of the photographs follow the movement of ships and troops out of Brest Navy yard, including the USS Imperator and the USS Philippine. There are group photos of the 803rd's officers and one photograph of a German submarine. Among the 4,000 troops aboard the Philippine were many African American soldiers, and there are photographs of these men playing in the 803rd's regimental band and of a boxing match they held during the voyage, as well as other photos. The collection also contains two postcards showing group photographs of soldiers [officers?] taken at Plattsburgh, N.Y., in 1916 - probably at the large World War I military training camp there.

Other materials from Samuel Loomis Hypes include his officer's record book, honorary discharge following the war, as well as clippings about Sugar Hollow, a North Carolina development begun by Hypes and his wife in the 1950s.

Finally, the collection also includes several files from William P. Hypes, an officer in the Y.M.C.A. in the 1960s and 1970s, particularly from his work towards the Y.M.C.A. World Action program.

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Collection consists of a 44-page scrapbook belonging to an unidentified compiler, that documents the history of Fort Des Moines as a Women's Army Corps training center, and more specifically the 404th Women's Army Corps (WAC) band, the first African American female band in the United States military. In addition to the approximately 100 photographs, there are photographic postcards, and clippings from official Fort Des Moines publications. The scrapbook begins with a photograph of the front page of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin from 8 December 1941, followed by a short history of Fort Des Moines, with clippings and photo postcards documenting its conversion to the first Women's Army Auxiliary Corps training center. The second half of the scrapbook documents the African American women's band, with photographs showing the women in and out of uniform; many of the photographs are signed or are otherwise identified in ink. Scenes include the practice room, women marching with instruments, and band members enjoying off-duty pastimes. There are at least two photographs of Major Charity Adams Earley, the first commissioned African American WAC. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of a forty-four page scrapbook belonging to an unidentified compiler, documenting the history of Fort Des Moines, Iowa, as a Women's Army Corps (WAC) training center, and the 404th Women's Army Corps band, the first African American female band in the United States military. The scrapbook contains 100 photographs, all but one black-and-white, ranging in size from 2 x 3 inches to 7 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches. The creator also included photographic postcards as well as clippings from official Fort Des Moines publications. The covers for the scrapbook are missing.

The first page contains a photograph of the front page of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin from December 8, 1941. The following early pages provide a short history of Fort Des Moines, with clippings documenting its conversion to the first Women's Army Auxiliary Corps training center. The clippings are augmented by photo postcards depicting the grounds, along with one showing a woman blowing a bugle into a oversize megaphone.

Documentation of the African American women's band begins on page 21, with a group portrait. Other photographs show the women in uniform; many of the photographs are signed or are otherwise identified in ink. Images include the practice room, women marching with instruments, and off-duty band members relaxing, riding bicycles, traveling together, preparing for sleep, or playing with pets. There are at least two photographs of Major Charity Adams Earley, the first commissioned African American WAC.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.