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Army Research Office--Durham (AROD) records, 1957-1982 2.7 Linear Feet — approx. 200 items

The Office of Ordnance Research (OOR), U.S. Army, a Class II military institution, established offices on the Duke University campus in June 1951. On January 16, 1961 the OOR ceased to exist and was instead re-designated as the Army Research Office-Durham (AROD) under the command of the Chief, Research and Development. The 1960s and 1970s saw a weakening in the working relationship between the military and the scientific communities. In the spring of 1975, ARO left the Duke campus and moved to the Research Triangle Park, ten miles southeast of Durham. Collection contains materials pertaining to the mission and organization of the U.S. Army Office of Ordinance Research, the forerunner of the Army Research Office-Durham (AROD). The materials in the collection span the years 1957-1982.

Collection contains materials pertaining to the mission and organization of the U.S. Army Office of Ordinance Research, the forerunner of the Army Research Office-Durham (AROD). Materials include summaries of the activities of the Duke/AROD coordination office for the fiscal years 1966, 1969-1971, and a scrapbook dated 1959. The scrapbook contains photographs of Duke officials, Ordnance office chiefs, various dedication events and ceremonies, event guest lists, official luncheons, and RTP exhibit, all from 1959. The materials in the collection span the years 1957-1982.

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Lucius A. Bigelow (1892-1973) served as a professor in the Department of Chemistry at Duke University from 1929 to 1961. Papers of Lucius A. Bigelow include correspondence, class examinations and procedures, research papers, research status reports, and photographs during his career as a professor of chemistry at Brown University and Duke University. Major subjects within the papers are fluorine chemistry, organic chemistry, chemistry education, and research conducted for the Manhattan Project, the Office of Naval Research, and the Army Research Office. Professional correspondents include H. S. Booth, Henry Gilman, and William A. Noyes. English.

Records produced by Lucius A. Bigelow throughout his career as a professor of chemistry both at Brown University and Duke University. Materials are present from 1915 to 1973. The bulk of the records consist of correspondence, class examinations and procedures, research papers, research status reports, and photographs. The majority of the material pertains to Bigelow's time at Duke University however, there is some material stemming from his tenure at Brown University.

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Marcus E. Hobbs papers, 1935 - 1980 7.5 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Marcus Edwin Hobbs, Duke University educator and administrator, served as Chair of the Chemistry Dept. (1951-1954), Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (1954-1958), Dean of the University (1958), Vice Provost (1962-1963), and Provost (1969-1970), before his retirement in 1970 as Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus. Collection includes correspondence and memoranda, research reports, financial papers, grant proposals, committee records, and other material. The bulk of the materials range in date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Subjects include the conflict of interest policy, the dedication of the Gross Chemistry Laboratory, development of sciences at the University, chemistry research in ordnance and tobacco, the Damon Runyan Memorial Fund for Cancer Research, the Research Triangle Institute, Paul M. Gross, long-range planning, the Office of Ordnance Research, and the Army Research Office, Durham. English.

Collection includes correspondence and memoranda, research reports, financial papers, grant proposals, committee records, and other material. The bulk of the materials range in date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Subjects include the conflict of interest policy, the dedication of the Gross Chemistry Laboratory, development of sciences at the University, chemistry research in ordnance and tobacco, the Damon Runyan Memorial Fund for Cancer Research, the Research Triangle Institute, Paul M. Gross, long-range planning, the Office of Ordnance Research, and the Army Research Office, Durham.