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Brenda Schoonover papers, 1994-2008 2.1 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

Brenda Schoonover was the former ambassador to Togo (1998-2000) and the interim ambassador to Belgium (2003-2004). Accession (2009-0259) (1000 items; 2.1 lin. ft.; 1994-2008) consists largely of speech files and other items created by Schoonover during the latter part of her career in the U.S. Foreign Service, including her ambassadorship to Togo, her time as Diplomat-in-Residence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and her subsequent post as Charge d'Affaires at the U.S. Embassy in Belgium, where she became interim ambassador in 2003. Speech topics range from international diplomacy, the Peace Corps, September 11th, trade, foreign relations, and West Africa development. Also included are media articles, the majority from Belgium newspapers in 2003-2004; miscellaneous photographs and letters; and numerous videocassettes documenting ceremonies and programs during her time in Togo. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

This collection is divided into 4 series: Speeches and writings, Media coverage, Miscellaneous materials, and Videotapes. The materials all date from the latter part of Schoonover's career, especially focusing on her time at UNC Chapel Hill and at the American Embassy in Belgium.

The majority of this collection consists of the texts of speeches, public remarks, and presentations made by Schoonover, beginning in 1997 with a few items from her Senior Seminar studies in Washington, D.C. Materials from her years in Togo are fairly light, with only a few embassy speeches. Her time as Diplomat-in-Residence at Chapel Hill and as Charge d'Affaires at the Belgium Embassy are strongly represented, with a variety of speeches discussing her Togo ambassadorship, conditions in West Africa, terrorism (both the Kenyan embassy bombings and September 11th), trade missions, and her Peace Corps experiences. Her remarks also reference her embassy activities in Belgium, both as Deputy Chief of Mission and interim ambassador. Audiences include Fulbright recipients and committees, the American-Belgium Association, schools and students, and businessmen. There are special speeches for Armistace Day and Flanders Field, as well as the Marine Corps anniversary celebration.

Videotapes make up another significant portion of the collection, and the majority deal with Schoonover's ambassadorship in Togo. Most appear to be recordings of her participation in ceremonies and events, including her presentation of credentials, receptions, interviews, and press conferences.

The media coverage of Schoonover covers her time in Togo, Chapel Hill, and Belgium, with the majority of the materials being from Belgian coverage of her interim ambassadorship.

The miscellaneous materials series includes official portraits, photographs, and certificates of Schoonover in various events and ceremonies; a booklet that she wrote about her aunt's life in 2008; and miscellaneous letters and brochures, dating from 1994-2004.

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The Duke-UNC Center for Research on Women was founded in 1982 as a collaborative endeavor between Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to promote Women's Studies scholarship, research, and curriculum development in the South. The project was originally named the Duke-UNC Women's Studies Research Center, but changed its name to the Duke-UNC Center for Research on Women in 1987. The Center operated with support from the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, smaller grants from local foundations, and institutional backing from Duke and UNC. The records contain correspondence, reports, grant documents, audiotapes, a videotape, and other materials relating to the Center for Research on Women. Major subjects include women's studies curriculum development and research, pay equity, and the relationships between race, class, and gender. Materials range in date from 1982 to 1992. English.

The records of the Duke University/University of North Carolina Center for Research on Women contain correspondence, reports, grant documents, audiotapes, a videotape, and other materials relating to the Center for Research on Women. Major subjects include women's studies curriculum development and research, pay equity, and the relationships between race, class, and gender. Materials range in date from 1982 to 1992.

Some of the materials in this collection are not immediately accessible because they require further processing before use. Please contact the University Archives before visiting to use this collection.

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George Wesley Johnson papers, 1829-1939 10 Linear Feet — 7 boxes, 2,620 items and 77 vols.

Correspondence, daybooks, in the early 1840s, ledgers, notebooks, accounts, bills, receipts, orders, promissory notes, postal records, and other papers (chiefly 1831-1888) of George Wesley Johnson and of his family. The material pertains to Tennessee agriculture, purchases of goods in Philadelphia and other northern cities before and after the Civil War, Wake Forest College, the University of North Carolina, Greensboro Female College, economic conditions after the Civil War, and the mercantile activities of the Johnsons.

This collection contains business and family papers of George W. Johnson, postmaster, justice of the peace, general merchant, and farmer; of his brother and business partner, James M. Johnson; of George W. Johnson's son, Francis Marion Johnson; and of other members of the family.

The collection contains letters to George W. Johnson from friends in Tennessee relative to agricultural and economic conditions there, 1838-1844; letters between George W. and James M. Johnson while one or the other bought goods in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, before the Civil War; bills, accounts, receipts, orders, promissory notes, and letters of a business nature, including occasional reference to another brother of George W. Johnson, Hiram, who had a financial interest in the mercantile establishment; numerous letters from George W. Johnson, his wife, Martha Johnson, and friends, including one at Wake Forest College, North Carolina, to Francis Marion Johnson while the latter was a student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1855-1858; letters, 1858-1861, from another brother of George W. Johnson, J. H. Johnson, who-was operating a store at East Bend in Yadkin County, North Carolina, as well as references to the debt of Olin High School, North Carolina, notices of meetings of Mocksville Lodge No. 134, letters to Martha Johnson from her daughter, Jennie, while a student at Greensboro Female College, North Carolina, 1857-1859, prices of foods and general commodities, letters from Eagle Mills, Buffalo Paper Mills, and W. Turner's cotton mill at Turnersburg, North Carolina, and bills of lading for various commodities.

Material during the Civil War period is limited to a few letters in 1863 from W. G. Johnson (younger brother of George W. Johnson) near Kinston, North Carolina; tax in kind returns and a petition from Francis Marion Johnson asking for military exemption on the basis of operating a grist mill. Postwar material consists largely of mercantile records of the Farmington store showing that goods were purchased from wholesale firms in New York City; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Richmond and Lynchburg, Virginia; Baltimore, Maryland; and Winston-Salem, Charlotte, Wilmington, and Salisbury, North Carolina.

Volumes consist of small notebooks, recording goods bought by George W. Johnson; daybooks; ledgers; postal records of the Farmington, North Carolina, post office, 1838-1856, including postage books, newspaper postage books, and receipt books for registered letters; blacksmith accounts; itinerary of a journey made by George W. Johnson, S. Taylor, and D. N. Reynolds through North Carolina and Tennessee in 1836; minutes of the Farmington Lodge No. 46 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and the Davie County Division of the Sons of Temperance. Included also are a few business letters from Nathaniel Boyden and Son, and a letter to Francis M. Johnson from a friend in Norfolk, Virginia, describing a typhoid epidemic in 1855.

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The Rainbow Triangle Oral History Project was originally conceived in 1996 as a way to document the lives of LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) people in the Triangle region in particular and central North Carolina in general. Ian Lekus became the Project Coordinator in 1996 and worked with a varying group of volunteers to acquire resources, conduct interviews, and ensure the preservation and access of the oral histories collected. More than 60 interviews were conducted between 1999 and 2004. The Rainbow Triangle Oral History Collection includes original oral history recordings, transcripts, biographical information on narrators, newsclippings, correspondence, and research materials.

The Rainbow Triangle Oral History Collection includes original oral history recordings, transcripts, biographical information on narrators, newsclippings, correspondence, and research materials. Oral history interviews are primarily sound recordings, covering a wide range of topics including the narrators' early lives, families and family relationships, education, social life, experience of their own sexual identity, experience in or work with the LGBT community (in the Triangle and elsewhere), activism, working lives, romantic partners, professional activities, and many other topics. Original recordings are primarily on audiocassette tapes. About half of the oral histories also include printed transcripts. A few oral histories also include additional biographical information about the narrator, much of it included on an information sheet created by the Rainbow Triangle project, but sometimes also including additional material such as news articles, correspondence, flyers, and other items. Also included are materials related to the planning and development of the project, including correspondence, drafts, notes, and background research into LGBT life in the Triangle and oral history as a documentary form, as well as several years worth of the Pink Triangle issue of the local Independent Weekly.

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Greensboro, North Carolina developer and construction company executive; originator of the concept and name for Research Triangle Park. The Romeo Guest Papers span the dates 1925-1987 with the bulk of the collection dated 1950-1986 and consists of correspondence, business records, clippings and printed material, and plans documenting the development of Research Triangle Park from conceptualization and groundbreaking through periods of growth and success in the 1970s and 1980s. The collection is organized into series for Appointment Books, a Condensed File of key events, Chronological Files, Corporate Files, Manuscript Material, People, Pinelands Company Files, Printed Material, and Audiocassettes. The Appointment Books Series houses Guest's annual schedules for the bulk of his professional life, consisting chiefly of notes on appointments but also containing ideas and thoughts as they occured to him. The Condensed File Series contains files on important events in the development of the "Research Triangle" and individuals instrumental in the bringing that vision to fruition. These people include Guest, business investor Karl Robbins, William Newell, Gordon Gray, and NC governor Luther Hodges. More detailed files on events and people described in the Condensed File can be found in the Chronological Files Series. These document the coordination efforts between the three major research universities in the area, private corporate interests, and the North Carolina state government. The Corporate Files Series contains files related to Guest's construction company, C.M. Guest and Sons, including some files on Research Triangle projects as well as other construction works in North and South Carolina. A series for Manuscript Material houses drafts and notes of Guest's unpublished history of the inception of Research Triangle Park. The People Series houses additional files on people of interest to Guest, including some involved in the success of the Research Triangle as well as research work on Guest and the Research Triangle. The Pinelands Company Files Series contains files documenting the work of the company created to acquire and develop land for Research Triangle Park. A series of additional Printed Material includes newspaper clippings documenting the construction of Research Triangle and the success of companies there as well as publicity for the then-new Research Triangle. The Audiocassettes Series, containing recorded oral histories and interviews with important figures associated with the development of the Research Triangle, completes the collection.

The Romeo Guest Papers span the dates 1925-1987 with the bulk of the collection dated 1950-1986 and consists of correspondence, business records, clippings and printed material, and plans documenting the development of Research Triangle Park from conceptualization and groundbreaking through periods of growth and success in the 1970s and 1980s. The collection is organized into series for Appointment Books, a Condensed File of key events, Chronological Files, Corporate Files, Manuscript Material, People, Pinelands Company Files, Printed Material, and Audiocassettes. The Appointment Books Series houses Guest's annual schedules for the bulk of his professional life, consisting chiefly of notes on appointments but also containing ideas and thoughts as they occured to him. The Condensed File Series contains files on important events in the development of the "Research Triangle" and individuals instrumental in the bringing that vision to fruition. These people include Guest, business investor Karl Robbins, William Newell, Gordon Gray, and NC governor Luther Hodges. More detailed files on events and people described in the Condensed File can be found in the Chronological Files Series. These document the coordination efforts between the three major research universities in the area, private corporate interests, and the North Carolina state government. The Corporate Files Series contains files related to Guest's construction company, C.M. Guest and Sons, including some files on Research Triangle projects as well as other construction works in North and South Carolina. A series for Manuscript Material houses drafts and notes of Guest's unpublished history of the inception of Research Triangle Park. The People Series houses additional files on people of interest to Guest, including some involved in the success of the Research Triangle as well as research work on Guest and the Research Triangle. The Pinelands Company Files Series contains files documenting the work of the company created to acquire and develop land for Research Triangle Park. A series of additional Printed Material includes newspaper clippings documenting the construction of Research Triangle and the success of companies there as well as publicity for the then-new Research Triangle. The Audiocassettes Series, containing recorded oral histories and interviews with important figures associated with the development of the Research Triangle, completes the collection.

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The Triangle Universities Computation Center (TUCC) was incorporated in 1965 as a cooperative venture between Duke University, North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with the goal of providing main-frame computing services, such as electronic data and batch processing, to the universities, RTI International and others. It dissolved in 1990 due to financial difficulties, the increased use of personal computers, and disagreements among the partners. Materials in the collection include administrative records, correspondence, meeting minutes, financial and statistical reports, memoranda, proposals, newsletters, photographs, slides, a scrapbook, and other materials from the Triangle Universities Computation Center.

The TUCC records spans the years 1954-1990. The collection is arranged into two series: Administrative Records, 1954-1990 and Visual Materials, 1966-1989 and undated.

Materials in the collection include administrative records, correspondence, meeting minutes, financial and statistical reports, memoranda, proposals, newsletters, photographs, slides, a scrapbook, and other materials from the Triangle Universities Computation Center.