Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Names University of Virginia -- Students Remove constraint Names: University of Virginia -- Students

Search Results

collection icon

Gregory family papers, 1762-1923 1.2 Linear Feet — 2 boxes, 416 items

Correspondence, diaries, and other papers of the Gregory family and the related Pomfret, Beasley, Davis, Smith families of King William County, Va. and later of Granville County, N.C. Correspondence of the 18th century is largely that of Sally Pomfret Beasley with friends (mostly suitors) and relatives prior to her marriage to Stephen Beasley in 1786. From 1786-1830 the correspondence is with relatives of the Smith and Beasley families who are living in North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Ohio. There is a gap in the papers from 1830-1859. After 1859, the papers are largely those of William H. (Buck) Gregory while at the University of Virginia (1859-60), in the Confederate Army (1864-65), and in the merchantile and publishing business in Oxford and Stovall, NC in the 1870's and 1880's. This correspondence contains information on tobacco culture, social life and customs, amusements, and education in North Carolina. In 1888 he married Mary J. Davis, and there is much correspondence of their courtship. Collection includes lists of students at Belmont Academy, 1859, in Granville County and at the Oxford Classical and Grammar School, 1859-60,as well as genealogical information on the Pomfret, Gregory, Smith and Alexander families. Also includes diaries for various years between 1873 and 1903.

The collection consists of papers, principally those of William H. (Buck) Gregory, Stovall, North Carolina, while at the University of Virginia, 1859-60, in the Confederate service, 1865-65, and in the mercantile and publishing businesses in Oxford during the 1870s and 1880s. In 1888 he married Mary J. Davis of "Abram's Plains", Granville County, a descendant of Col. Sam. Smith, and there is much of the correspondence that was carried on while they were courting. The collection contains some information on tobacco culture, social life and customs, amusements, education (There are lists of students at Belmont Academy, 1859, in Granville County and at the Oxford Classical and Grammar School, 1859-60.), and a considerable amount of genealogical data on the Davis, Pomfret, Gregory, Smith, Downey, Alexander, Webb, and Winston families.

The Civil War letters are centered around W. H. Gregory and his service to the Confederacy. He was sixteen at the beginning of the war and suffered a physical disability which kept him in reserve units. Letters concern the Granville Greys, Co. K of the 23rd N. C Troops, later the 1st Jr. Reserve (Co. B 70th Regt. Jr. Res.). Dr. T. R. Gregory is in a Yankee prison, and other Gregory relatives write war letters. C. W. Broadfcot, Hugh Lawson Clay, Theophilus Holmes, Joseph Jonathan Davis, Walter Clark, Allen R. Boyd, and Wm. G. Stanard are among the correspondents.

The bound volumes, include a 9 volume diary by William H. Gregory for the years 1873, 1888, 1889, 1891, 1895, 1895, 1898, 1902, and 1903. The contents of these volumes, however, are very meager. See the Samuel Smith Downey Papers to which about 62 items of early Smith-Downey family MSS. were transferred, 8-24-65, from the W. H. Gregory MSS.

collection icon

Isabelle Perkinson Williamson papers, 1827-1930, bulk 1909-1930 2.5 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — approximately 2,520 items

Correspondence and other items of Isabelle (Perkinson) Williamson, wife of Lee Hoomes Williamson, engineer, and of her mother, Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson. There are also letters from and items belonging to Lee H. Williamson. Topics include: life in Charlottesville, Virginia; students of the University; Edwin A. Alderman, University president; work in the Navy Department from 1913-1917; the early moving picture industry; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression. Includes descriptions of the Georgetown Visitation Convent, Washington, D.C., Europe during 1909 and 1910, Virginia, the Panama Canal Zone, Rancagua, Chile, and Puerto Rico. Papers relating to World War I consist of letters from soldiers and war workers; food cards; and letters from Mary Peyton, who was with a field hospital unit in France. The collection also contains information on early moving pictures; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression. Photographs - chiefly of family members and views from a Chilean mining settlement - and ephemera such as postcards, calling cards, tickets, and greeting cards round out the collection.

Collection comprises papers of Isabelle (Perkinson) Williamson, wife of Lee Hoomes Williamson, engineer, and of her mother, Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson. Included are many letters to Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson from former students of the University of Virginia who had patronized her boardinghouse in Charlottesville, Virginia, letters from Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson to her daughter describing life in Charlottesville, and commenting on Edwin A. Alderman, President of the University of Virginia, and many notes and bills reflecting frequent financial difficulties. Also included in this collection are letters between Isabelle P. and Lee Hoomes Williamson.

Many of the letters describe travels: letters from Isabelle P. Williamson to her mother were sent while attending the Georgetown Visitation Convent, Washington, D.C., while on a tour of Europe during 1909 and 1910, while visiting in Virginia and in the Panama Canal Zone, while working in the Navy Department in Washington, 1913-1917, and, after her marriage in 1917, while living near Rancagua, Chile, and in Puerto Rico with her husband. Also included in this collection are letters between Isabelle P. Williamson and Lee Hoomes Williamson.

The collection also contains information on the early motion picture industry; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression.

Papers relating to World War I consist of letters from soldiers and war workers, food cards, and letters from Mary Peyton, who was with a field hospital unit in France.

Sixty-nine photographs - chiefly of family members and views from a Chilean mining settlement - and ephemera such as postcards, calling cards, tickets, greeting cards, and Lee Williamson's WWI military identification card round out the collection.

Much more information on the collection's contents, written up in 1941, can be found in the Rubenstein Library cardfile catalog; please consult with Research Services staff.

collection icon

Jacob Mordecai papers, 1784-1936 4 Linear Feet — 2558 Items

Educator, of Warrenton, N.C., and Richmond, Va. Collection (2474 items; dated 1784-1936, bulk 1784-1904) comprises correspondence, ledgers, personal and school accounts (1811-1818), personal journals (1858-1861), and other papers of Mordecai and of his family. The material concerns schools and teaching in Warrenton, N.C., Mobile, Ala., and New York; life in Mobile (1823-1860), and at the U. S. Military Academy (1819-1823); literature of the day and social life and customs; Samuel Mordecai's book, Richmond in by-gone days; and personal matters. Correspondents include Rachel Mordecai Lazarus, Alfred Mordecai, Ellen Mordecai, Isabel R. Mordecai, Samuel Mordecai, Samuel Fox Mordecai, Achille Plunkett, and Carolina Mordecai Plunkett.

Collection contains personal correspondence and papers of Jacob Mordecai (1762-1838), educator and progenitor of a family long prominent in North Carolina and Virginia; and of his children and grandchildren. The majority of the letters are of a personal nature, but they include several important series of letters, as follows: copies of letters from Rachel (Mordecai) Lazarus (1788-1838) to Maria Edgeworth, beginning in 1816; of Ellen Mordecai (1790-1884) to her brother, Solomon Mordecai (1792-1869), while he was a medical student at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and later as a physician in Mobile, Alabama; of Ellen Mordecai, regarding her long tenure as a teacher in her father's school at Warrenton, North Carolina, and later as a governess in New York City, 1848-1852; of Caroline (Mordecai) Plunkett (1794-1862) and her husband, Achilles Plunkett (d. 1824), while they conducted a school at Warrenton, North Carolina, and of her later life as a teacher in Mobile; and of Alfred Mordecai (1804-1887) to members of his family while a student at the U. S. Military Academy, West Point, New York, 1819-1823. The correspondence contains frequent comment on literature of the day, information on social life and customs in general, and especially in Warrenton and Richmond, and life in Mobile, 1823-1860.

Letters of Samuel Mordecai (1786-1865) refer in part to his writing of Richmond in By-Gone Days (Richmond: 1856), and to land in Wisconsin sold for taxes. There are letters from 1810-1812 describing the Richmond theater, its actors, performances, and scenery, both the old theater, which burned down in a famous conflagration in 1811, and the new theater that replaced it. Included also are Jacob Mordecai's ledger containing personal and school accounts, 1811-1818; Samuel Mordecai and Company's ledger, 1839-1865, Petersburg, Virginia; and Isabel R. Mordecai's journals, 1858-1861, Charleston, S.C. There is also a secretary's report of the Sick Soldiers Relief Society, Raleigh, North Carolina, October 1, 1861; a description by Marshall De Lancey Haywood of the Mordecai residence in Raleigh with related correspondence of Pattie Mordecai, 1936; correspondence of Emma Mordecai, daughter of Jacob, with relatives and friends, including Solomon Cohen, an attorney of Savannah, describing European travel, and with Sally Vaughn Norral, a former slave; and bills, receipts, and bank statements of various family members.

Addition (1986) (84 items, dated 1805-1881) contains correspondence (1805-1838 and 1869-1875), most of which is personal, to and from various family members. Some of the letters provide insight into Mordecai's life as a boarding school student in Oxford, N.C., and later as a student at the University of Virginia. Also includes essays by Samuel F. Mordecai and two manuscripts by Moses Mordecai.

collection icon

John Fox papers, 1784-1892 5 Linear Feet — 2,139 Items

Politician and South Carolina legislator, from Lexington (Lexington Co.), S.C. Family and business papers of John Fox, and of his business associate, William L. Miller. Topics mentioned include the settlement of various estates; the militia; antebellum student life at the University of Virginia and South Carolina College (now the University of South Carolina); railroads; slaves and slavery; cotton production, local politics; secession; living conditions in Richmond during the war; John Fox's post-war debts; a sawmill in Wilcox Co., Ala., owned by brother Daniel and operated by brother Washington Fox; Daniel's service in the Alabama legislature and his comments on Alabama governor Benjamin Fitzpatrick, C. C. Clay, Jr., internal improvements, and public schools; the American Party; crime and law enforcement in the Confederacy; and Reconstruction and African-American politicians during Reconstruction.

Family and business papers of John Fox, and of his business associate, William L. Miller. Topics mentioned include the settlement of various estates; the militia; antebellum student life at the University of Virginia and South Carolina College (now the University of South Carolina); railroads; slaves and slavery; cotton production, local politics; secession; living conditions in Richmond during the war; John Fox's post-war debts; a sawmill in Wilcox Co., Ala., owned by brother Daniel and operated by brother Washington Fox; Daniel's service in the Alabama legislature and his comments on Alabama governor Benjamin Fitzpatrick, C. C. Clay, Jr., internal improvements, and public schools; the American Party; crime and law enforcement in the Confederacy; and Reconstruction and African-American politicians during Reconstruction.

collection icon

John Rutherfoord papers, 1754-1931, bulk 1781-1865 4.5 Linear Feet — 6 Boxes (2,745 items)

Collection contains correspondence, travel journals, account books, memorandum books, farm records, legal records, commonplace books, class notes, and other papers (chiefly 1781-1865) of John Rutherfoord; of his son, John Coles Rutherfoord, lawyer, planter, and state legislator; and of other members of the family. The papers before 1818 are chiefly legal and business papers and include information on family investments in Kentucky lands and other ventures. The papers of John Rutherfoord relate to his career as governor, his agricultural and business affairs; Virginia and U.S. politics, the American Party; the return of fugitive slaves, secession and events preceeding the Civil War, Confederate foreign relations; and family matters; and they include letters from Edward Coles, William Cabell Rives, and others of Rutherfoord's relatives by marriage, concerning agriculture and anti-slavery sentiment in Virginia and relations between the United States and France. John Coles Rutherfoord's papers relate to his attendance at Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) and the University of Virginia, his interests in politics and European travel, his legal activities, his work as a state legislator (1852-1865) and as manager of the family estates, westward expansion, and social life and customs in Virginia. Includes scattered correspondence of J.C. Rutherfoord's wife, Ann Seddon Roy Rutherfoord, referring to life in the South during and after the Civil War, and family matters.

This collection contains family, business, personal, and political correspondence of John Rutherfoord (1792-1866), lawyer, merchant, and governor of Virginia, 1841-1842; of his son, John Coles Rutherfoord (1825-1866), lawyer, planter, and member of the House of Delegates; of Ann Seddon (Roy) Rutherfoord (1832-1906?), wife of John Coles Rutherfoord; and of Thomas Rutherfoord (1766-1852), father of John Rutherfoord, and Richmond merchant.

Early papers are those of Isaac Holmes, assistant quartermaster at Petersburg, Virginia, chiefly from Richard Claiborne concerning provisions for Revolutionary soldiers; and of James Webb, apparently a lawyer of Smithfield, Virginia, having connections with John Marshall, Spencer Roane, and John Wickham, consisting of legal correspondence and papers. The papers of Thomas Rutherfoord include a letter, 1810, expressing objections to the embargo; letters concerning family matters and Rutherfoord's ailments; correspondence dealing with business affairs, chiefly his large landholdings in Kentucky and Ohio, and the title and sale of those lands; and an article, 1812, on the necessity of a navy to protect the maritime rights of the United States. Personal correspondence of John Rutherfoord is primarily with relatives, including his son, John Coles Rutherfoord; his brothers, Samuel Rutherfoord, William Rutherfoord, and Alexander Rutherfoord, and their families; relatives of Emily (Coles), Rutherfoord, his wife, including Tucker Coles, Isaac A. Coles, Edward Coles, Andrew Stevenson, and William Cabell Rives; his brother-in-law, Hodijah Meade; and Jane (Rutherfoord) Meade. Letters discuss family news; business matters; agriculture and the operation of their various plantations; the painting of family portraits; the marketing of wheat produced at “Rock Castle,” home of John Coles Rutherfoord, during the 1840s and 1850s; visits to various springs in western Virginia; the insurance society headed by John Rutherfoord; family illnesses, including full descriptions of remedies and medicines; purchase of land; detailed accounts of the construction of a boat for use at "Rock Castle"; purchase of a buggy, including description of various types of buggies; purchase and price of guano; detailed accounts of shipping by freight boats on the James River; purchase of slaves to prevent the separation of families; sympathy for slaves; purchase of shoes and making of clothes for slaver at “Rock Castle”; details of household management, such as the making of candles and the slaughtering of sheep; Richmond social life; and current events. Also included are letters from relatives in Ireland; letters of advice from John Rutherfoord to his son, John Coles Rutherfoord, while the latter was a student at Washington College, Lexington, Virginia, and at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia; letter, 1837, from Andrew Stevenson, U.S. minister to England, describing his and his wife's experiences in diplomatic circles in London, and papers relating to the settlement of the case of the U.S.S. Caroline, burned in 1837 by Canadian troops; a letter, 1832, from William Cabell Rives, while minister to France, concerning the instability of the French government, and Rives's conviction that slavery should be abolished; and letters discussing the activities of Thomas Ritchie (1778-1854), editor of the Richmond Enquirer, especially during 1849. Other papers relate to Rutherfoord's bank stocks, his legal practice, and mercantile affairs in Richmond, Virginia. The political correspondence includes correspondence between Rutherfoord and John Tyler concerning national politics, 1827-1831, Andrew Jackson and his policies, Henry Clay, political intrigue, "sectional cupidity," European affairs, and Tyler's concern for the welfare of the country; correspondence with Governor William H. Seward of New York while Rutherfoord was governor of Virginia pertaining to a controversy over fugitive slaves; letters from Rutherfoord to John Coles Rutherfoord commenting extensively on the American Party or Know-Nothings in Goochland County, Virginia; letters, 1860, from C. G. Memminger regarding national politics, secession, and the possibility of war; letter, 1860, from Rutherfoord to a cousin in London discussing the election of Abraham Lincoln, national politics, and his hatred of abolitionists, and protesting that the Prince of Wales had not been mistreated in Richmond; correspondence concerning the coming of the Civil War, the scarcity of food during the war, and refugees; letter, 1861, from John Brockenbrough describing the Washington Peace Convention and commenting on the compromise plan proposed by John Jordan Crittenden; letter, written under an assumed name, to Rutherfoord from Sir William Henry Gregory, member of the British Parliament with sympathies for the Confederate States of America, regarding the possibilities of recognition of the Confederate government by England and the means of communicating with Rutherfoord's nephew, who was attending a German university [published: Nannie M. Tilley (ed.), England and the Confederacy, American Historical Review 44 (October, 1938), 56-60]; and papers relating to Rutherfoord's service on a committee to assess damages made by the Confederate government in erecting defenses in Richmond.

The papers of John Coles Rutherfoord consist of his letters concerning literature, the activities of the Virginia House of Delegates, work on a banking bill in 1854, the Know-Nothing Party in Goochland County and their opposition to Rutherfoord's candidacy for a seat in the House of Delegates, visits to various springs in Virginia, trips to South Carolina to visit relatives, his courtship of Ann Seddon Roy, and his legal practice; correspondence regarding preparations for a European tour made by John Coles Rutherfoord and Charles Morris in 1851; letters to Rutherfoord discussing Virginia politics in the 1850s; letters from a former college mate, William M. Cooke, describing his legal practice in Saint Louis and Hannibal, Missouri, the slavery question, the growth of Saint Louis, emigrants to California and the sale of supplies to them, hunting grouse on the prairies, and the Know-Nothing Party in Missouri in 1855; letters from John D. Osborne and William Cabell Rives, Jr., containing descriptions of their travels in the North and in Europe and conditions in Paris, France; scattered letters referring to the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, and to the Southern Literary Messenger and John R. Thompson; and letters from William P. Munford concerning the translation of Homer's Iliad by his father, William Munford, and his own plans to have it published.

Correspondence of Ann Seddon (Roy) Rutherfoord includes letters to her husband, John Coles Rutherfoord, concerning preparations and plans for her visits to her father, William H. Roy, household matters, and their children; letters from William H. Roy to Ann Seddon (Roy) Rutherfoord; papers pertaining to the settlement of William H. Roy's estate; letters from her sister, Sue (Roy) Carter, and from her aunt, Sarah (Seddon) Bruce, describing their children, accouchements, servants, household affairs, crops, care for slaves, and, during the Civil War, refugees, the scarcity of food, family members in the Confederate Army, and crowded conditions in Richmond, Virginia; letters of James A. Seddon regarding the business affairs of Ann Seddon (Roy) Rutherfoord after the death of her husband; letters from other friends and relatives chiefly concerning personal matters; and papers relating to the operation of "Rock Castle," including scattered accounts, contracts for labor, and inventories.

Volumes consist of a notebook on rhetoric by Emily (Coles) Rutherfoord; legal notebook of John Rutherfoord containing notes on Blackstone; personal account book, 1840-1841, of John Coles Rutherfoord; autographs and clippings collected by John Coles Rutherfoord, 1836-1850; commonplace book, 1839-1842, of John Coles Rutherfoord also containing copies of several letters; Index Rerum, 1842, kept by John Coles Rutherfoord while at the University of Virginia; notebooks of John Coles Rutherfoord while a student at Washington College, on various subjects including chemistry, mathematics, Greek history, natural and moral philosophy, political economy, Latin history, law, and the Constitution; case books, 1844-1852, and memorandum book, 1856-1862, containing records of the cases handled by John Coles Rutherfoord; memorandum book, 1846-1864, with notes on farming operations; letter book, 1857-1866, letterpress copybook, 1856-1866, and letter book and commonplace book, 1852-1858, of John Coles Rutherfoord; index, 1856-1865, of the letters received by John Coles Rutherfoord; indices to articles on politics and major events in the New York Herald, 1856-1859, and in the Richmond Examiner, 1862-1865; notebook on Rutherfoord family history; a scrapbook, 1843-1856, relating to the career of John Coles Rutherfoord in the Virginia House of Delegates; and a legal notebook, 1895-1916, of John Rutherfoord, son of John Coles Rutherfoord.

collection icon

Winn family papers, 1780-1925, bulk 1780-1889 5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes, 2,684 items, 27 vols.

Collection contains personal and business correspondence, papers, and volumes, mainly of John Winn (d. 1844), farmer, lawyer, and postmaster, and his son, Philip James Winn, physician and postmaster of Fluvanna Co., Va., and of the Winn (Wynn) family. The papers of the elder Winn relate to bounty claims of Revolutionary veterans, personal and business affairs, and include information about "Bremo," the plantation of Gen. John Hartwell Cocke. The papers of Philip James Winn relate to his education at the Virginia Military Institute and the University of Virginia, his career in medicine, the service of his brothers in the Confederate Army, and family activities, and include a description of the religious service of the Dunkards, records of the invention and patenting of a "new gate latch," and a letter of William H. Winn describing the battles of Bethel (1861) and Gettysburg (1863). More than half the collection consists of receipts and bills connected chiefly with John Winn's work in Revolutionary bounty lands and with Philip James Winn's invention. Twenty-seven volumes include post office accounts of John Winn and of his successor, Philip James Winn; a letter book concerning the "New Gate Latch"; accounts of the estate of Samuel Kidd; letter books; ledgers; medical notes; and records of births and deaths of slaves.

Family and business correspondence of John Winn (d. 1844); of his wife Lucy Winn; and of their numerous children, including Philip James Winn. The correspondence of John Winn, farmer, lawyer, postmaster at Winnsville, captain in the War of 1812, and agent for General John Hartwell Cocke, includes information on Bremo, the plantation of the latter, including also a list of periodicals subscribed to by Cocker and legal cases relative to Revolutionary bounty land.

Correspondence centering around Philip James Winn includes information on the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, both of which he attended; one letter with a description of the unusual religious services of the Dunkards; a deed for land purchased by a free Negro; records of the invention and patenting of a 'New Gate Latch' by Philip J. Winn; and the interest of various members of the family in law, medicine, agriculture, mechanics, business, religion, and the operation of a stagecoach line between Richmond and Staunton, Virginia.

Collection also Includes a letter of William H. Winn containing detailed descriptions of the battles of Bethel, 1861, and Gettysburg, 1863, in which he participated as a Confederate soldier. More than half the collection consists of receipts and bills connected chiefly with John Winn's work in Revolutionary bounty lands and with Philip James Winn's invention. Twenty-seven volumes include post office accounts of John Winn and of his successor, Philip James Winn; a letter book concerning the 'New Gate Latch'; accounts of the estate of Samuel Kidd; letter books; ledgers; medical notes; and records of births and deaths of slaves.