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Box 1, Folder 9
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Jefferson notes that he has appointed Dr. Waterhouse to the Marine hospital in Boston, in return for his introducing vaccinations to the country, and describes the political fallout from the appointment. He plans to send his 15-year-old grandson to be with Rush in the Fall. He mentions Dr. Rose, and the impact on an embargo on relations with Europe.

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The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book. The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death. Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record.

Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army.

There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book.

The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death.

Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

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Benjamin Waterhouse papers, 1782-1841 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 250 Items

U.S. physician; pioneer of vaccination in the U.S. Collection chiefly consists of photostatic copies of correspondence written to Waterhouse, and brings together material from various U. S. collections. Includes some original letters acquired by Duke University. The bulk of the material, correspondence and minutes of meetings of the Corporation of Harvard College, relates to vaccination and Waterhouse's removal from his Harvard professorship. Correspondents include: J. Warren, J.C. Warren, J. Jackson, J. Gorham, W. Jenks, J.R. Coxe, B. Lincoln, S. Williams, J. Sullivan, B. Silliman, J. Redman, W. Cogswell, J. Lathrop, J. Monroe, J. T. Kirkland, H. Dearborn, H.A.S. Dearborn, J. Tilton, J. Winthrop, T. Jefferson, D. Webster, J. Sparks, L. Cass, and R. Elton. Collection also includes photostatic copy of Waterhouse's 1794 journal describing a trip to Saratoga Springs. Forms part of the Trent Manuscripts Collection and was acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection chiefly consists of photostatic copies of correspondence written by and to Benjamin Waterhouse, and brings together material from various U. S. collections. The copies seem to have been made in the 1940s. Includes some original letters acquired by Duke University. The bulk of the material, correspondence by and to Waterhouse, and minutes of meetings of the Corporation of Harvard College, relates to vaccination and other medical practice, and Waterhouse's removal from his Harvard professorship. Correspondents include: John Warren, J.C. Warren, James Jackson, John Gorham, William Jenks, John Redman Coxe, Benjamin Lincoln, Samuel Williams, James Sullivan, Benjamin Silliman, John Redman, William Cogswell, John Lathrop, James Monroe, J. T. Kirkland, Henry Dearborn, Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn, James Winthrop, Thomas Jefferson, Daniel Webster, Jared Sparks, Lewis Cass, and Romeo Elton. Collection also includes photostatic copy of Waterhouse's 1794 journal describing a trip to Saratoga Springs. Materials arranged chronologically.

Transcriptions of some of the original correspondence are present. Forms part of the Trent Manuscripts Collection and was acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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In this letter (ALS) to President James Monroe, Adams forwards a letter of Benjamin Waterhouse and suggests that Waterhouse's present difficulties are a result of his outspoken support of "the Union."

In this letter (ALS) to President James Monroe, Adams forwards a letter of Benjamin Waterhouse and suggests that Waterhouse's present difficulties are a result of his outspoken support of "the Union."

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Holograph, with signature page missing. Writer's references to Waterhouse and Jenner signal his involvement in the promotion of vaccination. Writer also communicates his surprise at Frank's decision to take up a post at the University of Vilna.

Holograph, with signature page missing. Writer's references to Waterhouse and Jenner signal his involvement in the promotion of vaccination. Writer also communicates his surprise at Frank's decision to take up a post at the University of Vilna.

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7 letters (ALS). Letter from Bartlett to the engraver Joseph Callender. Letters to Bartlett from his brother, Dr. Josiah Bartlett, and from Drs. Thomas Kittridge and Amos Gale. Letters from J. Bartlett and Gale relate to the cowpox virus and Benjamin Waterhouse's efforts to regulate its use.

7 letters (ALS). Letter from Bartlett to the engraver Joseph Callender. Letters to Bartlett from his brother, Dr. Josiah Bartlett, and from Drs. Thomas Kittridge and Amos Gale. Letters from J. Bartlett and Gale relate to the cowpox virus and Benjamin Waterhouse's efforts to regulate its use.

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34 ALS, including 2 photostats. Most are addressed to Spalding. Correspondents include: Ezekiel Porter, Arthur Livermore, S.L. Mitchill, Nicholas Rousselet, B. Waterhouse, S. Ricketson, W.H. Woodward, Clement Storer, G. Richards, W.D. Peck, N. Potter, Ebenezer Lerned, J.C. Warren, C. Wistar, J. Langdon, J.A. Smith, G.C. Shattuck, H.U. Onderdonk, J.L.E.W. Shecut, J. De La Motta, William Eustis Langdon, and S.N. Trevett. Matters discussed include: the cause and prevention of yellow fever and the promotion of the Pharmacopoeia. Reference is also made to medical periodicals, e. g. The New England journal of medicine, The medical repository, and the Medical and philosophical journal and review. Letters from U. Parsons, Sir Robert Perceval and M. Rouviere offer a view of European medicine, referring to J. Abernethy, Sir E. Home, Sir C. Bell, Sir W. Lawrence, W.T. Brande and J.P. Frank, and of the influence of books by Americans such as J. Gorham, P. Cleaveland and B. Rush.

34 ALS, including 2 photostats. Most are addressed to Spalding. Correspondents include: Ezekiel Porter, Arthur Livermore, S.L. Mitchill, Nicholas Rousselet, B. Waterhouse, S. Ricketson, W.H. Woodward, Clement Storer, G. Richards, W.D. Peck, N. Potter, Ebenezer Lerned, J.C. Warren, C. Wistar, J. Langdon, J.A. Smith, G.C. Shattuck, H.U. Onderdonk, J.L.E.W. Shecut, J. De La Motta, William Eustis Langdon, and S.N. Trevett. Matters discussed include: the cause and prevention of yellow fever and the promotion of the Pharmacopoeia. Reference is also made to medical periodicals, e. g. The New England journal of medicine, The medical repository, and the Medical and philosophical journal and review. Letters from U. Parsons, Sir Robert Perceval and M. Rouviere offer a view of European medicine, referring to J. Abernethy, Sir E. Home, Sir C. Bell, Sir W. Lawrence, W.T. Brande and J.P. Frank, and of the influence of books by Americans such as J. Gorham, P. Cleaveland and B. Rush.

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Matthias Spalding papers, 1801-1802 0.2 Linear Feet — 12 Items

American medical student in London. Papers generated during Spalding's stay in London include letters, a journal, lecture notes, and a printed advertisement for "Passage, packet and pleasure boats on the Grand Junction Canal." Correspondence from Edward Augustus Holyoke, Benjamin Waterhouse and Edward Jenner relate to Spalding's efforts to secure "vaccine matter" for both Holyoke and Waterhouse back in the United States. Spalding's journal includes a meticulous record of expenses, under various headings, e.g. "amusements", "barber", and "washing woman and shoe black". Spalding took notes on medical school lectures in London by William Babington (72 pp.), Henry Cline (113 pp.), Astley Cooper (20 and 112 pp.), Fox [?] (116 pp.) and John Haighton (176 pp.). Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Papers are dated from 1801-1802 and were generated during Spalding's stay in London. Materials include letters, a journal, lecture notes, and a printed advertisement for "Passage, packet and pleasure boats on the Grand Junction Canal." Correspondence from Edward Augustus Holyoke, Benjamin Waterhouse and Edward Jenner relate to Spalding's efforts to secure "vaccine matter" for both Holyoke and Waterhouse back in the United States. Spalding's journal includes a meticulous record of expenses, under various headings, e.g. "amusements," "barber," and "washing woman and shoe black." Spalding, who was a student at St. Thomas's Hospital, took notes on medical school lectures in London by William Babington (72 pp.), Henry Cline (113 pp.), Astley Cooper (20 and 112 pp.), Fox [?] (116 pp.) and John Haighton (176 pp.). Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.