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E. Roy Weintraub papers, 1930-2019 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — 1.1 Gigabytes

E. Roy Weintraub (b.1943) is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Duke University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings.

The E. Roy Weintraub Papers document his career as a historian of economics and mathematics, and professor at Duke University. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the history of economics, role in the community of history of economics scholars, and as a faculty member and administrator at Duke.

The collection also documents his communications with prominent economists as research subjects such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, and Lionel McKenzie. Included in Weintraub's communications are exchanges with prominent figures in the history of economics and related communities of scholars such as Roger Backhouse, Bradley Bateman, Anthony Brewer, Arjo Klamer, Mary Morgan, Deirdre McCloskey, and Philip Mirowski.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Weintraub's roles at in the History of Economics Society, at Duke University, and as an editor of History of Political Economy.

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Paul Davidson papers, 1961-2004 and undated 13.5 Linear Feet — Apprpoximately 10,125 Items

Economist on the faculty at the University of Tennessee and editor of the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics. The Paul Davidson Papers span the years 1961-2004 and document his professional career and interests, including post-Keynesian economics; international monetary payments and global employment policies; monetary theory; income distribution; and energy economics. The collection almost exclusively consists of correspondence files, with the exception of a few clippings and speeches folders. The most notable group of correspondents are his fellow post-Keynesians such as Victoria Chick, Alfred Eichner, John Kenneth Galbraith, Geoff Harcourt, Jan Kregel, Hyman Minsky, Basil Moore, Luigi Pasinetti, Joan Robinson, Anthony Thirlwall, and Sidney Weintraub. Other correspondents of note include Philip Arestis, Peter Bernstein, Robert Clower, Robert Eisner, Sir John Hicks, Allan H. Meltzer, Edward Nell, Don Patinkin, James Tobin, and Paul Samuelson. Other large amounts of correspondence and other materials relate to Davidson's editorial work with many major economics journals, including the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, which he founded; these folders typically contain correspondence between Davidson, journal referees, and authors.

The Paul Davidson Papers span the years 1961-2004 and document his professional career and interests, including post-Keynesian economics; international monetary payments and global employment policies; monetary theory; income distribution; and energy economics. The collection almost exclusively consists of correspondence files, with the exception of a few clippings and speeches folders. The most notable group of correspondents are his fellow post-Keynesians such as Victoria Chick, Alfred Eichner, John Kenneth Galbraith, Geoff Harcourt, Jan Kregel, Hyman Minsky, Basil Moore, Luigi Pasinetti, Joan Robinson, Anthony Thirlwall, and Sidney Weintraub. Other correspondents of note include Philip Arestis, Peter Bernstein, Robert Clower, Robert Eisner, Sir John Hicks, Allan H. Meltzer, Edward Nell, Don Patinkin, James Tobin, and Paul Samuelson. Other large amounts of correspondence and other materials relate to Davidson's editorial work with many major economics journals, including the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, which he founded; these folders typically contain correspondence between Davidson, journal referees, and authors. In one group of folders, Davidson engages with other colleagues in sometimes heated exchanges about bias in professional journals. In addition to correspondence with colleagues and authors, the files also contain correspondence related to academic departments where Davidson held positions. Reflecting his broad background, the papers also document Davidson's involvement with politics (see the Congress folder) and consultancy work for an energy company in his early career (the Oil and Energy folders), and his role as an active public figure, documented by letters to the editor for various maistream publications.

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Sidney Weintraub papers, 1938-1984 and undated 16 Linear Feet — Approximately 18,170 Items

Professor and economist specializing in Post Keynesian economic theory. These files document much of Sidney Weintraub's career as an economist; material dates from the early part of his professional career, 1938, until his death in 1983. Also included is a later accession with personal correspondence between him and his family.

These files document much of Sidney Weintraub's career as an economist; material dates from the early part of his professional career, 1938, until his death in 1983; it also includes some post-humous material from 1984. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Subject Files, Writings, Miscellany, Clippings, Photographs, and Printed Material. There are also descriptions of additions and oversize materials following the main collection description. Weintraub is best known for his work on inflation, wages and prices, unemployment, economic growth, and post-Keynesian monetary theory. Other significant topics in the papers include Weintraub's work with the U.S. government on economic policies, and his travels in England during and after World War II.

The Correspondence Series contains letters between 1939 and 1983. Weintraub, who did much of his own typing, scrupulously preserved carbon-copies of the letters that he sent to others which are included in the files, along with original letters sent to him by others. The bulk of the correspondence is dated between 1970 and 1983, a time when Weintraub was at the University of Pennsylvania and Waterloo in Canada (see Accession 2009-0178 for earlier correspondence). Weintraub regularly corresponded with a number of economists, including: Joan Robinson, Martin Brofenbrenner, Nicholas Kaldor, Abba Lerner, Henry Wallich, John K. Galbraith, Roy Harrod, Francis Seton, E. Roy Weintraub, Alice Vandermeulen, G.C. Harcourt, and many others. He also corresponded with many non-economists, including: Senators Barry Goldwater, William Proxmire, Gary Hart, and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey. An addition from 2009 consists largely of Weintraub's personal correspondence to his wife, Sheila Ellen Weintraub, during World War II and his post-war travels. It has been added to the end of the collection.

One problem arises when using the material in the Correspondence Series of Weintraub's papers, since this section is indexed and stored by year or portion of a year and not by author or receiver of the correspondence. Therefore, for the years 1970 through 1983, it is difficult to find particular letters for particular individuals if the date for the correspondence is unknown. For earlier years this is not such a problem given the smaller number of letters in the files prior to 1970.

The Subject Files Series is the largest, comprising nearly one-fourth of the initial collection. The material grows out of research undertaken by Weintraub primarily during the period 1970 to 1983 when he was attempting to influence government policy by promoting the merits of a Taxed-Based Incomes Policy (TIP). Of particular interest here is the early work on the publication of Capitalism's Inflation and Unemployment Crisis. Also of interest is the work that Weintraub did for the Canadian Institute for Economic Policy. In this series the material concerning the founding of the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics is included. This includes correspondence with co-editor Paul Davidson and publisher M.E. Sharpe, Inc. There is also some preliminary correspondence having to do with the publication and writing of Keynes and the Monetarists. These files contain material dealing with Weintraub's extensive national and international lecturing tours, with materials from trips to Europe, Asia, Puerto Rico, and much of the United States. Finally, material on the writing of Modern Economic Thought, editorials for the New York Times, and the Puerto Rico Economic Quarterly is included in this category.

The Writings Series includes work both by Weintraub himself and by others, both published and unpublished. Of Weintraub's own work, there are early versions and drafts of works later published. For example, one finds early work on the published piece Keynes and the Monetarists and Other Essays, by Sidney Weintraub along with Hamid Habibagahi, Henry Wallich, and E. Roy Weintraub (1973). Also included is some early work on the 1981 book Our Stagflation Malaise. Several unpublished drafts can also be found here including portions of the uncompleted work "Economic Thought: 1945-1965", which also had the title "Recent Developments in Economic Theory". Other uncompleted works are "Economics of Capitalism and Keynesian Evolution: A Theory of Employment, Growth, Income Distribution, Inflation and Money, with Policy Implications." This rather lengthy title was the second revised title of a proposed book that assessed both the microeconomic and macroeconomic components of Post Keynesian monetary theory. Finally in this section are the completed, yet unpublished, works "Pricing Interstate Telephone Services: Some Aspects of FCC Regulations of the Bell System Pricing Policies" and "The Theory of the Structure of Interest Rates."

The Miscellany Series contains other writings by Weintraub at different times in his professional career. Of particular interest is Weintraub's testimony to various congressional committees and federal regulatory bodies. Also included are Weintraub's handwritten notes on several of the graduate and undergraduate classes that he taught, including The History of Economic Thought, Recent Developments of Economic Theory, Theories of Business Cycles, Theory of Value and Distribution, an Introduction to Mathematical Economics, Price and Distribution Theory, Seminar in Selected Problems of Economic Theory, Public Finance and Modern Economic Theory, Keynesian Economics, Topics in Macroeconomics, and partial notes on other courses and subjects as well.

The Clippings Series contains newspaper and magazine articles by Weintraub or about his economic theories. They are written pieces from the popular press. Included in the clippings are letters to the editor from publications throughout the United States and Canada. For the most part, these articles by Weintraub or mentioning Weintraub deal with aspects of Taxed-Based Incomes Policy (TIP). Though not all of these clippings related to economics, the majority of them do.

Both the Photographs and the Printed Material series of the files are limited. The former contains only a few black and white publicity pictures from one or more of Weintraub's speaking tours. The latter houses only a few journal reprints. Of special interest in the volumes series is an unpublished manuscript sent to Henry Wallich at the time of their first collaboration on Taxed-Based Incomes Policy. It outlines, in detail, Weintraub's ideas on the subject from Professor Wallich.

The group of materials added to the main collection at a later date deals with research that Weintraub was considering at the time of his death. This includes an early draft of a book, titled Post Keynesian Evolution. In these files are also condolence letters received by Mrs. Weintraub at the time of her husband's death, along with various obituaries and eulogies.

Accession (2009-0178) (1.2 lin. ft.; 900 items; dated 1937-1971) consists largely of Weintraub's personal correspondence to his wife, Sheila Ellen Weintraub, during World War II and his post-war travels. Other correspondents include his brother and his son. These letters offer excellent insight into Weintraub's activities during the war, as well as descriptions of London and India in the pre-war and post-war period. This accession has been added to the end of the collection; see below for box numbers.