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McCoy-Love Family papers, 1774-1970 and undated 12.3 Linear Feet — circa 9,210 Items

Asheville, N.C. residents. Two prominent members of the families were George William McCoy, Sr. (b. 1901), editor of the Asheville-Citizen Times, and his father-in-law, Harry Weaver Love (b. 1883), YMCA executive. The collection contains personal and business correspondence, genealogical material, financial and legal records, printed material, clippings, addresses and writings, scrapbooks, miscellaneous items, photographs, and a number of volumes. Topics include the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Assoc. Harry Love's business papers include a large number of correspondence, reports, pictures and volumes relating to his work with the YMCA, in the U.S. and abroad; there are a great many items relating to the Philippine Islands. There are a sizable number of papers from Wythe Munford Peyton, a civil and highway engineer, who worked for several N.C. railroads; the papers of William C. Coleman, a businessman who sold and serviced Harley-Davidson motorcycles (1914-1915); and papers of the Frelinghuysen-Southwick family of N.J. and N.Y., one relative being a Senator and another, Emeline Sherman Smith, a poet. There are a few items concerning Thomas Dixon who founded the Mt. Mitchell Assoc. of Arts and Sciences.

The papers of this Asheville, North Carolina family span the years 1774-1970. Two prominent members of the families were George William McCoy, Sr. (b. 1901), editor of the Asheville-Citizen Times, and his father-in-law, Harry Weaver Love (b. 1883), YMCA executive. The collection contains personal and business correspondence, genealogical material, financial and legal records, printed material, clippings, addresses and writings, scrapbooks, miscellaneous items, photographs, and a number of volumes. Topics include the development of parks in the Appalachia region, particularly the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and activities relating to the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Association. Harry Love's business papers include a large number of correspondence, reports, pictures and volumes relating to his work with the YMCA, in the U.S. and abroad; there are a great many items relating to the Philippine Islands. There is a sizable number of papers from Wythe Munford Peyton, a civil and highway engineer, who worked for several N.C. railroads; the papers of William C. Coleman, a businessman who sold and serviced Harley-Davidson motorcycles (1914-1915); and papers of the Frelinghuysen-Southwick family of N.J. and N.Y., one relative being a Senator and another, Emeline Sherman Smith, a poet. There are a few items concerning Thomas Dixon who founded the Mt. Mitchell Assoc. of Arts and Sciences.

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The Young Men's-Young Women's Christian Association was created in 1969, an apparent merger of the men's and women's Y's elements. The YM-YWCA was a student religious organization operating within the Religious Activities Department and overseen by an advisory board and advised by the Associate Directors of Religious Activities. The collection contains material pertaining to the activities and organization of the YM-YWCA including annual reports, flyers, handbooks, directories, and materials documenting the joint efforts of the YMCA and YWCA around the same period. The dates in the collection range from circa 1968-1979.

Collection contains material pertaining to the activities and organization of the YM-YWCA, a social activist religious group, including annual reports, flyers, handbooks, directories, and materials documenting the joint efforts of the YMCA and YWCA around the same period. Includes the logbook (1972/1973; restricted) and related material of the organization’s Draft Counseling and Information Center; "A White Paper on Institutional Racism at Duke: The Curriculum" (1972); listings of vocations for social change produced by OPT, its center for social change information; and copies of the handbook, The University Experience (1969/1970-1978/1979). The handbooks include essays on race relations, sexuality, civil rights and social change, and the experiences of foreign and minority students, as well as University history and administrative information. In an annual report (1970/1971) the book is said to have changed from "a book of interesting facts and figures" to "a rather controversial" alternative view of the University.

Also present in the collection are the records of the Institute for Nonviolent Study and Action (INSA) which was a leftist, activist agency of the Duke YM-YWCA. Their records include brochures, flyers, newsletters, manuals, and information concerning political and social issues of the early 1970s, and activities of the INSA. A sampling of topics include: Buddhism and nonviolence, Indochina; history, politics, and culture during the war, Cuba, UMWA (United Mine Workers Association), University investment, War -- bombing effects, and Wounded Knee. The INSA also collected flyers, brochures, and other printed matter from national organizations. Some organizations include: Committee on New Alternatives in the Middle East, Gandhi Peace Foundation, Vietnam Veterans Against the War, and New American Movement.