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The John Lakin Brasher Papers, 1857-1983 and undated (bulk 1917-1970), are comprised of church-related and personal correspondence; records of the Iowa Holiness Association; records of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference; religious writings and speeches (including sermons, diaries and manuscripts of published works); printed material (tracts, religious brochures, serials, and hymnals); photographs (including many of camp meetings); transcriptions of tape recordings; legal papers; financial papers; and miscellanea. Most of the material concerns the religious career of John L. Brasher; the Holiness (Santification) movement in the Methodist Church, particularly in Alabama; Holiness education and the administration of the John H. Snead Seminary in Boaz, Alabama and Central Holiness University (later John Fletcher College) in University Park, Iowa; and camp meetings in the South, particularly Alabama, and the Midwest. Includes biographies of clergy and accounts of religious and family life in rural north Alabama. Among correspondents are Joseph P. Owens, F.D. Leete, John Paul, and missionaries in Eygpt, India, China, and Japan. Contains letters and printed material concerning the separation and reunification of the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

The John Lakin Brasher Papers, 1857-1993 and undated (bulk 1917-1970) are comprised of church-related and personal correspondence; records of the Iowa Holiness Association; records of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference; religious writings and speeches (including sermons, diaries and manuscripts of published works); printed material (tracts, religious brochures, serials, and hymnals); photographs (including many of camp meetings); transcriptions of tape recordings; legal papers; financial papers; and miscellany. Most material concerns the religious career of John L. Brasher; the Holiness (Sanctification) movement in the Methodist Church, particularly in Alabama; Holiness education and the administration of John H. Snead Seminary in Boaz, Ala.; and Central Holiness University (later John Fletcher College) in University Park, Ia.; and camp meetings in the South, particularly Alabama, and the Midwest. Includes biographies of clergy and accounts of religious and family life in rural north Alabama. Among correspondents are Joseph P. Owens, F. D. Leete, John Paul, and missionaries in Egypt, India, China, and Japan. Contains letters and printed material concerning the separation and reunification of the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

Brasher's activities as a minister are documented throughout the collection. The Correspondence and Transcriptions of Tape Recordings Series reveal Brasher's reflections on scripture and provide accounts of congregational reactions to his preaching. Transcripts of his sermons appear in the Writings and Speeches Series, Sermons Subseries as well as in the Transcriptions of Tape Recordings and in some of the published articles (Printed Material Series, Serials Subseries) and manuscripts of his books (Printed Material Series, The Way of Faith). His diaries and correspondence document his travels and his preaching engagements. Numerous invitations to preach and requests for guidance reflect Brasher's leadership role among ministers, missionaries, and church officials. Letters to and from converts regarding their religious experiences and responses to Brasher's preaching and writing are scattered throughout the Correspondence Series.

Brasher's administrative role in religious organizations and in church-affiliated educational facilities is well-represented in the Correspondence Series as well as in the Iowa Holiness Association Series and the Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference Series. Minutes, reports, and financial records are among the papers of these organizations, reflecting both Brasher's leadership and involvement and the activities of the organizations themselves. The Pictures Series includes some photographs of the schools with which Brasher was associated and of the attending students.

Brasher's career as an author is well-documented, not only in the Writings and Speeches Series, but throughout the collection. The Correspondence Series includes letters to and from his publishers and from editors of various religious serials to which Brasher contributed. The Printed Material Series contains many of these serials with articles by Brasher as well as tracts he wrote.

Throughout the collection, information on church history abounds. The Correspondence Series and the Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference Series in particular contain letters concerning the rivalry between the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; and the eventual unification of the two organizations. Conflicts between Fundamentalist and Modernist ideas also appear in the correspondence and in the Printed Material Series.

As Historian of the Alabama Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Brasher wrote biographies of preachers, missionaries, and church officials involved in the Holiness Movement. These biographies appear in the Writings and Speeches Series, Biographical Sketches of Colleagues Subseries. Some of these biographies were published in Glimpses: Some Personal Glimpses of Holiness Preachers I Have Known, and with Whom I Have Labored in Evangelism, Who Have Answered to Their Names in the Roll Call of the Skies. Manuscripts of some of those appearing in the published work can be found in the Glimpses Subseries. Some of the letters and questionnaires from which Brasher wrote his sketches appear in the Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference Series, Biographical Information Subseries. The letters from which his information was gleaned vary in degree of detail, with some providing only dates and places of birth, marriage, ordination, etc.; and others giving descriptions of incidents in the religious life of the subject.

Correspondence, Pictures, Transcriptions of Tape Recordings, and the Family Biography Subseries of the Writings and Speeches Series document Brasher's life with his family. Brasher's biographical writings and other works in the Family Biography Subseries, and the Transcriptions of Tape Recordings Series also provide a small but rich glimpse into the traditional lore, customs, and folkways of the rural upland South.

Details of camp meetings are documented throughout the collection. The Transcripts of Tape Recordings Series contains transcripts of camp meetings. The Printed Material Series includes promotional literature for camp meetings; descriptions of facilities; and hymnals (some shape-note) used in these services. An unusual collection of copies of photographs of camp meetings from the early 1900's through the 1940's in Ohio, Iowa, Alabama, Michigan, Texas and Pennsylvania can be found in the Pictures Series.

The Boatman Family Papers, also housed in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, contains correspondence from John Lakin Brasher and other members of the Brasher family.

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Collection spans the pastoral career of United Methodist minister Julius Logan Brasher. Brasher was minister at six congregations in New Jersey from the early 1940s to 1976, when he and his wife Lois Brasher relocated to the Brasher home of Gadsden, Alabama. Collection contains Brasher's diaries and pastor's record books, materials from the churches where he ministered, sermons and accompanying notes, subject and name files, correspondence, photographs, and printed materials.

The Julius Logan Brasher Papers document the personal and pastoral life of the Methodist minister. Son of Holiness Movement minister John Lakin Brasher, Julius Logan Brasher attended Drew Theological School. He served as a Methodist minister in New Jersey from 1937 to 1976, after which time he retired to his original home of Gadsden, Alabama. He continued to serve as a pastor and religious advisor in that community through 2011. Brasher's activities as a minister at six churches in New Jersey and two in Alabama are documented throughout the collection. Collection contains Brasher's diaries and record books, sermon notes, church files, name and subject files, correspondence, photographs, some printed materials, and one audiotape.

Diaries files comprise diaries, calendars, and pastor's record books kept by Brasher between 1946 and 1977. Entries contain notes about parishioners, appointments, and sermons given.

The sermons and religious writings files contain full-length sermons as well as notes and cue cards used by Brasher to give sermons at churches throughout his career, including his years as a student at Drew Theological School. Topics range from weekly Sunday services to weddings, memorials, and holidays. Some sermon notes are folded into the church program during which the sermon was given. Many sermons are undated. Other writings include some of Brasher's academic papers from Seminary as well as narrative religious writings from throughout his career. A portion of the sermons arrived alphabetically sorted by Brasher, referring to the titles of the sermons.

The Churches files relate to Brasher's activities as a pastor at United Methodist churches in New Jersey and Alabama. The files contain church programs, newsletters, correspondence, and printed materials collected and created by Brasher. Files from Gadsden UMC include memos and notes from the Julius Brasher Discussion Class. The following churches are represented in the series: • First Congregational Church of Chester, NJ (Chester, NJ): 1939-1942 • Blairstown United Methodist Church (Blairstown, NJ): 1942-1946 • Denville Community Church (United Methodist) (Denville, NJ): 1946-1955 • Rutherford United Methodist Church (Rutherford, NJ): 1955-1962 • Westwood United Methodist Church (Westwood, NJ): 1962-1968 • Plainfield United Methodist Church (Plainfield, NJ): 1972-1976 • Walnut Grove United Methodist Church (Walnut Grove, AL): 1978-1979 • Gadsden United Methodist Church (Gadsden, AL): 1979-2011

Correspondence files contain letters received by Brasher beginning with his tenure at Drew Seminary and throughout his career. Primary among the correspondents is his father, John Lakin Brasher. The elder Brasher wrote letters to Julius and the rest of the family several times a week from the 1930s through the 1950s. Other correspondents include parishioners, friends, and other family members. Name and Subject Files contain correspondence, printed materials, notes, and writings on subjects assigned by Brasher. Among the name files is a folder with Brasher's correspondence with Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, a social reformer and Methodist Bishop. Oxnam was accused of being a communist by Donald Jackson. Some correspondence relates to these accusations, and Brasher's support of Oxnam. Subject files include Brasher's files from Drew Theological School, the Rotary Club, the Northern New Jersey Cabinet, and his work on the Board of Education trustees and the Board of Discipleship Trustees.

Photographs are mostly undated black-and-white snapshots from Brasher's church communities in New Jersey. Common subjects are Sunday school classes, church picnics, headshots of congregants, and promotional images of the churches where Brasher was pastor.

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Lauren Henkin photographs, 2015 May 1.5 Linear Feet — 1 box; 47 item — 40 photographic prints; 7 supplemental sheets

The forty color inkjet photographs in this collection were taken by Lauren Henkin in May 2015 in and around Hale County, Alabama, part of the Alabama and Mississippi "Black Belt." The prints (17x22 inches) form part of a body of work titled "What's Lost is Found." Subjects include rural inhabitants, white and black; residences of all kinds, including many interiors; church exteriors and interiors; and rural and wooded landscapes, As part of the photographer's intent to capture the spirituality she perceived in the place and its people, captions for each image are taken from biblical verses. Collection includes five sheets with detailed captions and locations for each image. The Black Belt region is noted for its black topsoil, cotton plantations, the legacy of slavery, civil rights history, and photographic history: Walker Evans, Gordon Parks, and William Christenberry both produced some of their most well-known work in these same places. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The forty color inkjet photographs in this collection were taken by Lauren Henkin in May 2015 in and around Hale County, Alabama, part of the Alabama and Mississippi "Black Belt." The prints (17x22 inches) form part of a body of work titled "What's Lost is Found." Subjects include rural inhabitants, white and black; house interiors; church exteriors and interiors; and rural and wooded landscapes. Many of the images contain religious symbols and objects such as crosses. As part of the photographer's intent to capture the spirituality she perceived in the place and its people, captions for each image are taken from biblical verses. Collection includes five sheets, also 17x22 inches, with detailed captions and locations for each image.

The Black Belt region is noted for its black topsoil, cotton plantations, the legacy of slavery, civil rights history, and photographic history: Walker Evans, Gordon Parks, and William Christenberry both produced some of their most well-known work in these same places.

From the artist's statement: "It wasn't a place that should be simplified by an imposed narrative. The people I met had a request, 'Please, no more photos of poor kids barefoot on a front porch.' I wanted to show the complexity of a place that could in one moment take the viewer into the woods, to the home of a man that lives with his dogs in the poorest of conditions to the grounds of a mansion covered in soft southern light, to the interior of a home populated with Andrew Wyeth reproductions depicting wind and billowing curtains. I wanted to avoid stereotypical perspectives on the racial and socioeconomic divides, and instead, focus on the interconnectedness between the landscape, the flesh, and the spiritual."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.