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Charleston Cotton Exchange records, 1880-1952 3 Linear Feet — 729 Items

The Charleston Cotton Exchange was founded in 1872 in the port of Charleston, South Carolina; one of its main functions was to provide commodity trading statistics to the mercantile community. Collection includes minutes of the meetings of the Board of Directors in 1884; financial statements, 1896-1898, 1929-1930; letters of invitation to prospective members, 1910; and groups of reports on the cotton market at Charleston, 1936-1944, 1948-1950. The volumes contain detailed statistics on the shipping of cotton and other goods at Charleston, 1880-1905; cotton receipts at ports in the United States, 1899-1906; price quotations from several markets in naval stores, 1881-1886; and the finances of the Exchange, 1888-1938.

These papers came to the library with those of the Cheshire, Sullivan and Canaday, cotton merchants of Charleston. Theophilus P. Cheshire and Solomon M. Canaday were presidents of the Exchange at various times during the 1930s to 1950s. The folder of cancelled checks, 1939-1952, contains checks bearing names of presidents during this period.

The chronological file of papers includes minutes of meetings of the Board of Directors in 1884, financial statements of 1896-1898 and 1929-1930, and a letter of invitation in 1910 to prospective members. A letter from President Cheshire in 1932 is a report on the finances of the exchange and the state of the cotton trade at Charleston. During 1948-1950, there are numerous reports of daily sales and inventories of cotton and frequent price quotations. A number of monthly reports record statistics on receipts and shipments of cotton.

Statistics on domestic and international shipments, inventories, and other data are in the Exchange's "Report on Cotton Movement" at Charleston, 1936-1944 that are filed in separate folders. The function of the Charleston Cotton Exchange as a provider of trading statistics to the mercantile community is represented by seven volumes. Marine News Clearances No. 2 (1880, July-1886, Aug.), and No. 5 (1899, Sept.-1905 Feb.) record shipping information: date of clearance, nationality, rig, name of vessel, master, destination, cargo (types of goods and their quantity), by whom cleared, and date of departure. Clearances No. 2, includes a "List of Steamships Loaded at Charleston for Foreign Ports" (1879, Sept.-1885, Sept.) that records the number of bales of Sea Island and upland cotton shipped, its destination, and other information. Marine Arrivals No. 3 (1886, Aug.-1892, Aug.), No. 4 (1892, Sept.-1899, Aug.), and No. 5 (1899, Sept.-1905, Feb.) list date of arrival, nationality, rig, name of vessel, master, place from which the ship had come, cargo (quantities not given), and consignee.

The "Weekly Cotton Receipts at All U.S. Ports" (1899, March-Sept., 1906) includes statistics for Galveston, New Orleans, Mobile, Savannah, Charleston, Wilmington, Norfolk, Baltimore, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and other ports. These statistics include cumulative totals and comparative figures for the preceding year. Naval Stores No. 2 (1881, Sept.-July, 1886) contains price quotations (several times daily) for rosin and turpentine on the markets at Wilmington, New York, London, and Liverpool. Figures are more numerous for Wilmington and New York. In 1883 price quotations were begun for the market at Savannah, and those for Liverpool were discontinued. On the inside front cover is the "Annual Statement of Stocks, Receipts and Exports for the Year Ended March 31st, 1882," Wilmington, N.C. (cotton, turpentine, rosin, tar, and crude). Four volumes record finances of the Exchange: Cashbook, June 1888-Dec, 1898; Cashbook, Jan., 1916-Aug., 1931; Cashbook, Sept., 1931-Aug., 1938; and the Assessments of Members, 1891-1916.

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The Frederick Fraser Papers comprises documents of a cotton planter in South Carolina. Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook that contains a variety of materials related to social life in South Carolina and the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards.

The Frederick Fraser Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook (152 p.). Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. The scrapbook contains a variety of materials related to both the social lives of the De Saussure, Fraser, and several other South Carolina families, as well as their activities during the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards. Scrapbook also includes letters from Henry De Saussure Fraser, a surgeon in Virginia. His letters describe military activities and life as a Union prisoner from 1863-1864 in Fort McHenry and Old Capitol Prison, as well as the Charleston earthquake in 1886. The scrapbook also includes a small volume of the De Saussure family genealogy. Persons mentioned in the collection include Thomas Boone Fraser, Sr., Daniel De Saussure, and Henry William De Saussure.

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Thomas Ellison Keitt was a resident of Clemson, Oconee County, South Carolina. Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Among the papers are records belonging to Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J. L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator. Documents include legal and financial papers and volumes; personal correspondence; speeches and pamphlets; and genealogical materials. Topics in the correspondence sometimes touch on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and refer to life in Charleston, South Carolina. There are also Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Included are a genealogical chart; social and personal letters with some information on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and life in Charleston, South Carolina; papers of Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J.L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator; and Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence (who published under the name "Lawrence") Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Legal papers date from 1770 to 1913, and consist of indentures, wills, deeds, plats, summonses, and records of trial and judgment. Some of these documents concern the work of Thomas Bauskett (an attorney) and James Wadlington (a judge). Other financial papers, 1768-1902, include promissory notes, bills, receipts and small account books of Sarah Cates's children (1819), and Thomas Bauskett (1798). Manuscript volumes include a ledger, 1758-1803, of Thomas Wadlington, Sr.; an inventory of the estate of James Wadlington, 1831-1850; a mercantile account book, 1831-1879, of Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington; and account books, 1931-1939, of Mrs. Thomas Wadlington Keitt, including wages paid agricultural laborers, and subscriptions paid to the Methodist Church at Clemson. There are also miscellaneous speeches, prayers, and writings, and printed material, including pamphlets and clippings related to the Wadlington and Keitt families.

Among the printed materials is a published letter, "For Confidential Circulation Among Members of the Secession Party," dated October 24, 1851, which contains information on the Union party and the secession movement in South Carolina. Clippings contain information on Tammany Hall, the Salvation Army, Lord Randolph Churchill, William Booth, Henry George, and H. Clay Bascom.