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Frances Hooper papers, 1970s 0.6 Linear Feet — 3 items

Frances Hooper (1892-1986) was founder and president of the Frances Hooper Advertising Agency, and was one of the first female advertising executives in the United States. Accession (2009-0100) (3 notebooks; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1970s) consists of three spiral-bound collections of typed memoirs written by Hooper around the 1970s. Subjects include her childhood, her journalism career in Chicago, her transition into advertising with Marshall Fields, and descriptions of her friends, her travels, and her book collections. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0100) (3 notebooks; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1970s) consists of three spiral-bound collections of typed memoirs written by Hooper around the 1970s. Subjects include her childhood, her journalism career in Chicago, her transition into advertising with Marshall Fields, and descriptions of her friends, her travels, and her book collections. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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George E. Scott papers, 1854-1910 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — approx. 721 Items

Correspondence, photographs, printed material, legal papers, and a journal, relating to the personal and business life of George E. Scott, buyer and seller of lumber in Ala. and Fla. Some material also concerns the Perdido Bay Lumber Company in Pensacola, Fla. Includes a journal Scott kept (1873-1874) while on a ship carrying lumber and naval stores from Boston to Florida. Also includes two years of courtship letters while Scott was in England.

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The Harper Theater Dance Festival Records (1965-1979) presented Chicago audiences with more than a decade of annual performance seasons from a variety of celebrated dance companies. Originating in 1965 as the brainchild of Bruce and Judith Sagan, proprietors of a series of local, neighborhood newspapers in Chicago, the Festival also served as an important milestone in American modern dance as the pilot program for the National Endowment for the Arts Residency Touring program. Favorite performers included Merce Cunningham, Alwin Nikolais, Paul Taylor, José Limón, and Murray Louis. The collection includes financial records, production requirements, clippings, correspondence, posters, programs, tickets, photos, negatives, 35 mm slides, video and audio reels, and several small objects.

The collection contains the institutional records of the Harper Theater Dance Festival, public relations and publicity materials of dance companies, as well as the personal files of the collection's donor, Judith Sagan. The materials housed within the collection are in a variety of formats, including paper-based records, photographs, 35 mm slides, programs, newspaper clippings, large-format posters and publicity materials, audio reels, open reel video, and several objects.

The bulk of the materials were collected or created during the running of the Festival (1965-1979), with additional records (e.g. souvenir programs, professional membership records, financial records, etc.) collected by the donor following the Festival's demise.

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John Ridlon papers, 1846-1936 and undated 8.0 Linear Feet — 28 boxes; 2 oversize folders; 1 pamphlet binder

Physician, surgeon, and professor specializing in orthopedic medicine, practicing in New York State and Chicago, Illinois. Collection consists of medical case files and casebooks, articles and papers, correspondence, photographs, ephemera, diplomas, and medical illustrations dating chiefly from the 1890s-1920s, relating to Dr. John Ridlon's career and extensive research and writings on orthopedics. Case files - a large majority of them pediatric - include tubercular infection of the joints, scoliosis and other deformities, spondylitis (spinal arthritis), and limb or joint injuries. There are hundreds of illustrations in the form of medical case photographs and photographic prints of early X-rays. Accompanying the papers is a set of 118 black-and-white photographs taken during Ridlon's medical military training at a base in Plattsburgh, N.Y., and some during his service as a surgeon in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War I. Duplicate and similar images are found in glass plate and nitrate film negatives. A set of 49 glass lantern slides of his time in the WWI medical camp were used to illustrate lectures about his experiences; a reprint of the lecture text is in the collection. There are also a handful of photographic portraits of Ridlon. Correspondents include: R. Osgood, A. Steindler, P.D. Wilson, R.K. Ghormley, J.E. Goldthwait, A.B. Judson, R.W. Lovett, H.W. Orr, S.W. Mitchell, and H. Cushing. In addition to discussing medical cases and research, letters also document Ridlon's involvement with two charitable institutions: the Home for Destitute Crippled Children (Chicago) and the Country Home for Convalescent Children. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

This material, which documents John Ridlon's medical career, consists of medical case files, casebooks, articles and papers, correspondence, photographic materials, diplomas and ephemera, and medical illustrations, relating to Ridlon's research and writings on orthopedics. Case files - a large majority of them pediatric - include tubercular infection of the joints, scoliosis and other deformities, spondylitis (spinal arthritis), and limb or joint injuries. There are hundreds of medical illustrations in the form of photographs mounted on board, photographic prints of early X-rays, and printed illustrations on loose sheets that show patients, symptoms or deformities, and treatments such as surgery, braces and casts; many of them were used by Ridlon in his published works.

Among the bound volumes are six casebooks (1889-1892); four letterbooks (1873-1903); an autograph manuscript, "Some comments on the principles and practice of Hugh Owen Thomas" (undated); a scrapbook of figures and illustrations (undated); three volumes composed of reprint clippings and manuscript notes (undated); and a bound volume of 88 reprints (1888-1923). There are also many diplomas and certificates received by Ridlon from various educational institutions.

Correspondents include: R. Osgood, A. Steindler, P. D. Wilson, R. K. Ghormley, J. E. Goldthwait, A. B. Judson, R. W. Lovett, H. W. Orr, S. W. Mitchell, H. Cushing. In addition to discussing medical cases and research, letters also document Ridlon's involvement with two charitable institutions: the Home for Destitute Crippled Children (Chicago) and the Country Home for Convalescent Children.

Accompanying the professional papers is a set of 118 black-and-white photographs taken during Ridlon's service as a surgeon in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War I. The photos were taken by several photographers at a medico-military training camp in Plattsburgh, N.Y., around 1916. Ridlon reported on these experiences at a medical conference in 1917 and used a set of 67 glass lantern slides to illustrate the lecture, 49 of which survive in the collection; a reprint of this paper is also available in the collection.

In the same series there is a set of 30 glass plate negatives and still image nitrate film negatives; these materials are closed to use but contain duplicate or similar images found in the print photographs. Finally, there are several portraits of Ridlon, chiefly photographs taken in his office and examination room, taken in 1911. A glass plate negative with a bust portrait of Ridlon rounds out the photographic series.

The collection also contains several folders of ephemera, early professional diplomas and certificates, letters of recommendation for Ridlon's Chicago appointment in 1892, and his obituary.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.