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Blanche Boyd papers, 1957-1984 10 Linear Feet — 662 Items

Blanche M. Boyd is a writer raised in South Carolina. She has also lived and worked in California, Vermont, and New York. The collection consists of correspondence (1963-1984); notes, drafts, and proofs of her books Nerves, Mourning the Death of Magic, and The Redneck Way of Knowledge; reports on the Greensboro shootings (November 1979); and materials on the Democratic National Convention of 1980. Short stories, essays, reviews of Boyd's work, and photographs are also included. Many of the letters are long and substantive, including some retained copies of Boyd's own letters. Her report on the Greensboro shootings is based on a large number of newspaper and magazine clippings, also included in the collection, as well as interviews. Materials on Boyd's trip to China in 1983 are also found in the collection.

The collection consists of correspondence (1963-1984); notes, drafts, and proofs of her books Nerves, Mourning the Death of Magic, and The Redneck Way of Knowledge; reports on the Greensboro, North Carolina shootings of Communist Worker Party members (November 1979); and the Democratic National Convention of 1980. Short stories, essays, reviews of Boyd's work, and photographs are also included. Many of the letters are long and substantive, including some retained copies of Boyd's own letters. Her report on the Greensboro shootings is based on a large number of newspaper and magazine clippings, also included in the collection, as well as interviews. Twenty cassette tapes on the Greensboro shootings; The Redneck Way of Knowledge; and Boyd's trip to China in 1983 also form part of the collection. An index to the tapes may be found at the beginning of the collection.

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Edward James Parrish papers, 1888-1926 and undated 9.2 Linear Feet — 31 boxes; 3 oversize folders; and 6 volumes — Approximately 1500 items

Tobacco manufacturer, resident of Durham, North Carolina, and Tokyo, Japan. The papers of Edward James Parrish primarily consist of business and personal papers, correspondence (chiefly 1900-1921), and photographic collections of Parrish and of his wife, Rosa Bryan Parrish. Items include a notebook on tobacco trade in China and Japan (1894-1900), letter books (1900-1904), and a scrapbook created by their only daughter Lily Parrish. Turn-of-the-century photograph albums relate to the Parrishes time in Japan (circa 1899-1905) and form a large series of their own. Two were assembled by Kichibei Murai of the Murai Brothers, a Tokyo cigarette manufacturing company of which Parrish was the first vice-president; they contain photographs of his residences and of banks, mines, oil fields, farms and tobacco factories in which he had an interest. Also included are seven fine souvenir albums with large hand-tinted albumen prints from noted Japanese studios, including that of Kusakabe Kimbei. There are also personal photograph and postcard albums of the Parrish's travels in Japan, Korea, and China, and Mrs. Parrish's reminiscences and impressions of her life in Japan. Loose family photographs and portraits dating from about 1890 to 1920 round out the collection.

The Edward James Parrish Papers include business and personal correspondence (chiefly 1900-1921) of Parrish and of his wife, Rosa Bryan Parrish. There are also various bills, a notebook on tobacco trade in China and Japan (1894-1900), letter books (1900-1904), photographic collections, several postcard albums, and a scrapbook created by Lily Parrish.

The papers also include Rosa Parrish's reminiscences and impressions of her life in Japan, as well as her writings on the status of women. There are also materials relating to Kichibei Murai's family and to Murai Brothers Company in Japan, close partners and friends of the Parrish family.

Photographic formats include glass plate negatives, loose prints, photo postcards, and over 20 albums. Two of the photograph albums date from the late 19th century and were owned by Kichibei Murai; they contain photographs of his residences and of banks, mines, oil fields, farms and tobacco factories in which he had an interest. Also included are black-and-white late 19th and early 20th century loose albumen and early gelatin silver prints of family members.

The photograph albums document the Parrish family's travels in Japan, China, and Niagara Falls, and include personal snapshots taken at these locations as well as in their home of Durham, N.C.; there are also many commercial souvenir photographs from Japan. The latter take the form of large finely handtinted albumen prints of Japanese scenery, landscapes, cultural sites and temples, clothing, entertainment, and transportation, housed in high-quality souvenir photograph albums; many of these feature highly decorated lacquer inlay covers, elaborate bindings. Most include captions. The studio of Kusakabe Kimbei, a noted photographer, created many of the prints and albums, and the work of other notable studios have also been identified.

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E. Ireland was a mature, unmarried Scottish woman at the time she authored a series of travel diaries from 1916 to 1920. Collection consists of five volumes (686 pages) of an illustrated travel diary kept by E. Ireland, a mature unmarried Scottish woman, between 20 August 1916 and 28 February 1920. The diaries document Ireland's travels throughout the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Japan, South Africa, and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). Typical entries describe local inhabitants and customs, conversations with fellow travelers, and sites visited. Many entries include sketches, pasted in postcards, photographs, postage stamps, menus, passenger lists, and other ephemera.

Collection consists of five volumes (686 pages) of an illustrated travel diary kept by E. Ireland, a mature unmarried Scottish woman, between 20 August 1916 and 28 February 1920. The diaries document Ireland's travels throughout the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Japan, South Africa, and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). Typical entries describe local inhabitants and customs, conversations with fellow travelers, and sites visited. Many entries include sketches, pasted in postcards, photographs, postage stamps, menus, passenger lists, and other ephemera.

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H. J. M. Shaw diary, 1902-1909 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 item

H. J. M. Shaw (b. 1876) was an English mining engineer and businessman who spent much of his time in China between 1902 and 1909. This collection consists of the diary of H. J. M. Shaw (b. 1876), an English mining engineer and businessman. The diary covers the period 1902-1909. The diary entries are in two distinct parts: June through August, 1902 during the start of a trip to China and April 1908 to March 1909 starting with Shaw travelling back to England with stops in Japan and Canada. Subsequent entries describe his vacation trips while back home including time spent in Ireland. The final entries describe his trip back to China and his daily activities once in Weihan, China.

This collection consists of the diary of H. J. M. Shaw (b. 1876), an English mining engineer and businessman. The diary covers the period 1902-1909 (predominantly the last 2 years) and its entries provide insight into the life of a turn-of-the-century business and vacation traveler. The diary entries are typically brief day-to-day accounts of location, weather, and people met. There are occasionally longer anecdotes regarding stories he's heard or that were related to him, meetings with Chineses government officials, and reactions to events in the news. There are also a couple drawings where Shaw attempts to show what is causing his dental problems. The diary can be seen as two distinct parts. In the first part, entries commence on June 21, 1902 during the start of a trip to China and describe events while travelling across the Atlantic to New York and then North America by train across Canada to Vancouver. Shaw then travels abord the Empress of China to Yokahama, Japan and then on to China. The second part starts with entries in April 1908 while Shaw is travelling in a houseboat along the Hsun Hsien River in China with friends. The diary then describes Shaw's trip back to England with stops in Japan and Canada along the way. When back in England, entries describe his subsequent vacation trips to visit friends in Worcestershire and taking a vacation in Ireland. Entries from October to November 1908 describe his trip back to China this time through France, Italy, Egypt, Singapore and Hong Kong. The remainder of the diary describes his daily activities in Weihan, China which typically included work in the morning, a visit to the library to meet his Chinese teacher or to a golf club in the afternoon, and dinner with his wife and friends in the evening. The diary also contains two draft letters. The first is a letter dated June 18, 1903 to the chief engineer of the Henan mining works describing how he was treated during his visit. The other is dated June 9, 1904 regarding the return of books from the mines to the Tientsin Municipal Library. There are also two newspaper clippings; one describing an explosion within the city of Canton, China and a letter to the editor response to an article in the China Times on Missionaries in China.

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The Inabelle Graves Coleman Papers, 1942-1981 (bulk 1952-1957), contain letters and more than 300 photographs documenting her life as a female Baptist missionary in Shanghai, China, and Taipei, Taiwan. Coleman was a school administrator, teacher, and author who lived much of her life abroad in service for the Southern Baptist Convention. Written almost entirely to family members, the letters date from 1946 to 1957, and contain information about her daily life and work; most were sent from Taipei, although some from Shanghai are also included.

The letters reveal tremendous enthusiasm for her work, the people around her, and those she brought into the church's ministry. This zeal for fostering the Christian life in others often overshadowed news of her regular teaching dutes, as she perhaps found no separation of the two. She wrote often of her students, and her concern for her family back in the U.S. Admiration for the people of Shanghai and Taipei are also evident. Letters frequently touch on her health while abroad, her physical surroundings, a tight schedule of teaching and ministering, and Grace Baptist Church, which she founded.

Photographs complement many of the letters, especially those about Grace Baptist Church and its programs. Subjects are mainly people and scenes in Taipei, although a large number are unidentified. Small series of photos include those of her assistants, Lillian Lu and Daisy, students, portraits of her family, as well as many of Grace Baptist Church. Included also are photographs of various church and school groups.

There are two autograph books from Chinese friends; manuscript writings include four articles written for the church, including one about the University of Shanghai's president. Also in the collection is a file of miscellaneous materials including a report of the Yates Baptist Association, biographical information, several business cards, a pamphlet in Chinese, an invitation, and clippings.

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Marquis Lafayette Wood was a Methodist clergyman, missionary, and educator. He served as President of Trinity College (Randolph County, N.C.) from 1883 to 1884. The Marquis Lafayette Wood Records and Papers primarily consist of diaries, sermons and addresses, with a small amount of correspondence, minutes, account books, and writings. Modern materials, such as Wood family genealogies and biographies, were added to the collection as well. Major subjects of the collection include Trinity College during the mid 1880s and Wood's career as a minister in North Carolina and as a missionary in China during the early 1860s. Materials range in date from 1852-1984 (bulk 1855-1892). English.

The papers of Marquis Lafayette Wood form part of the records of the President of Duke University. Wood's papers span the years 1852-1984, with the bulk occurring between 1855 and 1892. Included are diaries, correspondence, minutes, account books, writings, sermons and addresses, and other materials. The materials are useful for the study of Trinity College during the mid 1880s. Minutes from the college trustee meetings held in 1883-1884, accounts, and correspondence form the official records of Wood's presidency. Letters concerning the federal support and enrollment of Cherokee Indians at Trinity are of particular interest. Wood's diaries from 1883 and 1884 provide limited information on Trinity College.

Wood's ministerial career is the major subject documented in the collection. The diaries span the years 1856-1885; sermons correspondence, and miscellaneous volumes supplement the account of Wood's service that is reflected in the diaries. Diary entries portray Wood's life as an itinerant pastor, missionary, and presiding elder in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The papers portray Wood's life as well as provide information on a number of western North Carolina churches, including those in the Salisbury District, Iredell District, Surry Circuit, the Greensboro District, and the Charlotte District.

Of particular significance are the diaries and letters that date from 1860 to 1866, the years Wood served in China. Beginning in 1859, the diaries relate Wood's voyage to China, his observations on life and customs in China, and his views of the Chinese. Ellen (Morphis), Wood's wife, became ill while in China and died. Wood noted both her symptoms and attempted treatments in his diary. The diaries from the period also reflect Wood's observations on the Tai-Ping Rebellion. Other papers concerning Wood's service in China include synopses of letters Wood wrote to E.W. Sehon of the Missionary Society of the Episcopal Church, South.

In addition to serving as minister, Wood was interested in the history of North Carolina Methodism. Wood collected and penned accounts of early western North Carolina churches and ministers. His manuscripts on Sunday School work in the Fayetteville District and the rise of Methodism in the Yadkin Valley are among the extant notes, letters, and volumes.

Other figures and subjects reflected in the papers include Charles Force Deems, Methodist minister, Wood family genealogy, and Wood's lifelong loyalty to Trinity College. An address by Wood to the Trinity College alumni association is present.