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Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by an amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. Nightingale from 1920 to 1921, while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's photographs are of value not only for the image content, which includes street scenes, vendors, modes of transportation, shrines, temples, pagodas, monasteries, towers, and landscapes, but also for his lengthy contextual commentary written on the back of each card. The majority of the images were taken in Hangzhou (referred to as Hangchow), Suzhou (Soochow), Mount Putuo island (Pu-tu), and Shanghai, China, but there are also a few images from other cities (Ningbo, Chang'an, and Harinen?), and a set of 11 images were taken in Japan. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. (F.B.) Nightingale from 1920 to 1921 while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's collection is of value not only for the image content, which includes many street scenes with individuals in addition to well-known sites and landscapes, but also for his lengthy captions on the back of each card, commenting on food customs, architecture, folklore, commerce, and religious beliefs and practices, as seen from a Westerner's perspective.

The majority of the images were taken in Suzhou (referred to in captions as Soochow, 55 images), Hangzhou (Hangchow, 44), Mount Putuo Island (Pu-tu, 14), and Shanghai, China (13), but there are also a few photographs from other cities (Chang'an, Ningbo, Harinen?), and a set of 11 images taken in Japan. There is also one photograph of overgrown land on Nightingale's Pasadena, California property called "Palawoo." Several images feature Nightingale, and one shows the porter carrying his camera equipment. The majority of the images are crisp with little fading. A few are stamped with small identification numbers.

Subjects include numerous temples, pagodas, monasteries, monuments, tombs, and other historic sites, some of which no longer exist. Nightingale was able to capture some images of temple interiors, and he often noted which religious sites allowed entry to women. There are many photos of street life, river traffic, modes of transportation, and Chinese vendors and pedestrians going about their daily business.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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George Warren and Kate Rumsey Hinman missionary photograph albums, 1892-1900 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 2 photograph albums — 7 1/4 x 11 3/4 inches — 2 photograph albums

Two late 19th-century photo albums with small and large images primarily documenting George Warren and Kate Rumsey Hinman's travels and missionary work in central China. Most of the photographs were taken in Fuzhou (Foochow) and Shaowu, Fujian Province, where the Hinmans were assigned. The images are accompanied by detailed captions, and feature missionaries, mission and church buildings, Chinese preachers, local officials, children, river scenes, landscapes, and landmarks. There are also a few images of the Burrell School in Selma, Alabama, and two ministers in Michigan. The photographs are typically mounted one to a page, and are chiefly a mix of gelatin and collodion prints, with a few albumen prints included.

Two late 19th-century photograph albums primarily documenting George Warren and Kate Rumsey Hinman's travels and missionary work in central China. Most of the photographs were taken in Fuzhou (Foochow) and Shaowu, Fujian Province, where the Hinmans were assigned.

The earliest images, in Album 1, are of the Rev. George Stillwell of Garden, Michigan and the Rev. E. G. Palmer and family of Oxford, Michigan. A series of images of buildings, staff and students of the Burrell School in Selma, Alabama are also found in Album 1, as well as a few larger images from China. The black-and-white photographs in this album appear to be a mix of albumen and collodion or gelatin prints.

Album 2 contains 57 black-and-white photographs taken in China, Fujian Province, chiefly in Fuzhou (Foochow) and Shaowu, where the Hinmans were assigned. There are portraits of local officials, river scenes, and other landscapes. Other locations seem to be mostly in Fujian Province, and include the Ing Hok River, Ing Tai; Yeng Bing (?), a location near Fuzhou; Guling (Kuliang), a mountain location near Fuzhou, where the Hinmans stayed in a cottage; and landmarks such as monasteries, city gates, and the Bridge of 10,000 Ages in Fuzhou (also found in the Sidney Gamble photographs collection at Duke). The photographs in this album appear to be primarily collodion and gelatin prints.

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The Inabelle Graves Coleman Papers, 1942-1981 (bulk 1952-1957), contain letters and more than 300 photographs documenting her life as a female Baptist missionary in Shanghai, China, and Taipei, Taiwan. Coleman was a school administrator, teacher, and author who lived much of her life abroad in service for the Southern Baptist Convention. Written almost entirely to family members, the letters date from 1946 to 1957, and contain information about her daily life and work; most were sent from Taipei, although some from Shanghai are also included.

The letters reveal tremendous enthusiasm for her work, the people around her, and those she brought into the church's ministry. This zeal for fostering the Christian life in others often overshadowed news of her regular teaching dutes, as she perhaps found no separation of the two. She wrote often of her students, and her concern for her family back in the U.S. Admiration for the people of Shanghai and Taipei are also evident. Letters frequently touch on her health while abroad, her physical surroundings, a tight schedule of teaching and ministering, and Grace Baptist Church, which she founded.

Photographs complement many of the letters, especially those about Grace Baptist Church and its programs. Subjects are mainly people and scenes in Taipei, although a large number are unidentified. Small series of photos include those of her assistants, Lillian Lu and Daisy, students, portraits of her family, as well as many of Grace Baptist Church. Included also are photographs of various church and school groups.

There are two autograph books from Chinese friends; manuscript writings include four articles written for the church, including one about the University of Shanghai's president. Also in the collection is a file of miscellaneous materials including a report of the Yates Baptist Association, biographical information, several business cards, a pamphlet in Chinese, an invitation, and clippings.