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Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by an amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. Nightingale from 1920 to 1921, while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's photographs are of value not only for the image content, which includes street scenes, vendors, modes of transportation, shrines, temples, pagodas, monasteries, towers, and landscapes, but also for his lengthy contextual commentary written on the back of each card. The majority of the images were taken in Hangzhou (referred to as Hangchow), Suzhou (Soochow), Mount Putuo island (Pu-tu), and Shanghai, China, but there are also a few images from other cities (Ningbo, Chang'an, and Harinen?), and a set of 11 images were taken in Japan. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. (F.B.) Nightingale from 1920 to 1921 while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's collection is of value not only for the image content, which includes many street scenes with individuals in addition to well-known sites and landscapes, but also for his lengthy captions on the back of each card, commenting on food customs, architecture, folklore, commerce, and religious beliefs and practices, as seen from a Westerner's perspective.

The majority of the images were taken in Suzhou (referred to in captions as Soochow, 55 images), Hangzhou (Hangchow, 44), Mount Putuo Island (Pu-tu, 14), and Shanghai, China (13), but there are also a few photographs from other cities (Chang'an, Ningbo, Harinen?), and a set of 11 images taken in Japan. There is also one photograph of overgrown land on Nightingale's Pasadena, California property called "Palawoo." Several images feature Nightingale, and one shows the porter carrying his camera equipment. The majority of the images are crisp with little fading. A few are stamped with small identification numbers.

Subjects include numerous temples, pagodas, monasteries, monuments, tombs, and other historic sites, some of which no longer exist. Nightingale was able to capture some images of temple interiors, and he often noted which religious sites allowed entry to women. There are many photos of street life, river traffic, modes of transportation, and Chinese vendors and pedestrians going about their daily business.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The papers of tobacco industrialist and philanthropist James Augustus Thomas (1862-1940) primarily concern his commercial and diplomatic dealings in East Asia, and the opening of the tobacco market in China and other countries in the early 20th century. Materials include many boxes of correspondence, print and ephemeral materials, and photographs. Correspondents include Herbert Hoover, Robert Lansing, Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Sun Yat-sen. Includes materials relating to U.S.-China foreign and economic relations; the marketing of U.S. cigarettes in Asia; the British-American Tobacco Company; domestic policies and financial development in China; political events in East Asia and Europe; and philanthropy in China, including Thomas' efforts to bring Chinese students to Duke University. There are also some personal letters and three audiocassettes of an oral interview with Dorothy Read Thomas, Thomas's widow, with a typed transcript; interview topics include her life in China and St. Petersburg, Russia in the 1920s.

The papers of James Augustus Thomas comprise many folders of correspondence, printed material, and other papers (chiefly 1914-1940), related to his commercial and diplomatic dealings in East Asia and the opening of the tobacco market in China and other countries. Correspondents include Herbert Hoover, Robert Lansing, Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Sun Yat-sen. There are also some personal letters.

The materials document U.S.-China foreign and economic relations; the marketing of U.S. cigarettes in Asia; the British-American Tobacco Company; U.S.-Chinese trade; domestic policies and financial development in China; political events in East Asia and Europe; American foreign policy in East Asia (1920s-1930s); and philanthropy in China, including Thomas' efforts to bring Chinese students to Duke University and other North Carolina institutions.

Printed materials in the collection include reports, economic summaries, essays, conference programs, memos, and ephemera such as admission cards, tickets, and pamphlets. Some materials relate to the World's Fair in New York, and a visit by a Chinese delegation to New York in 1915, illustrated with photographs.

Additions to the collection include three letters pertaining or written to son, Jimmy, by his parents, gelatin silver photographs and a few negatives, and three audiocassettes of an oral interview (by Duke Professor Emeritus Richard Watson) with Dorothy Read Thomas, widow of James A. Thomas, which include a typed transcript. Interview topics include her life in China and Petrograd (now St. Petersburg, Russia) where she taught school briefly; and the social life and customs in Bejing and Shanghai after she married Thomas in 1922.

There are also negative microfilm reels of the series "China Through Western Eyes: Part 3, The Papers of J.A. Thomas c.1905-1923." Positive reels have been sent to the microfilm department.

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Set of 95 photographic color images in slide format, taken by Jeff Kosokoff, a librarian at Duke University, Durham, N.C., while traveling in Japan, mainland China, and Taiwan from January to April 1983. The images are arranged by geographic location, in alphabetical order: Akira, Japan; Hong Kong; Hohhot (or Huhhot), the capital of the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region in North China; the Inner Mongolia grasslands; and Taipei, Taiwan. Subjects includes the rural landscapes and cityscapes of each area and its citizens, including street scenes and street art, markets, advertising and other signs, vending machines, and modes of transportation. Photographs taken in Inner Mongolia include dwellings (yurts), families and individuals in native dress, domestic Bactrian camels, and some scenes from the city of Hohhot. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists of a set of 95 photographic color images in slide format, taken by Jeff Kosokoff, a librarian at Duke University, Durham, N.C., while traveling in Japan, mainland China, and Taiwan from January to April 1983. The images are arranged by geographic location, in alphabetical order: Akira, Japan; Hong Kong; Hohhot (or Huhhot), the capital of the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region in North China; the Inner Mongolia grasslands; and Taipei, Taiwan. Subjects includes rural landscapes and cityscapes of each area and its citizens, including street scenes and street art, markets, advertising and other signs, vending machines, and modes of transportation. There are images of an acrobatics performance and some night cityscapes. Images taken in Inner Mongolia include dwellings (yurts), families and individuals in native dress, domestic Bactrian camels, and some scenes from the city of Hohhot.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.