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The Neighborhoods Project was created as part of the Community Programs department within Duke's Center for Documentary Studies. According to the CDS website, it offered North Carolina elementary school teachers an innovative and effective way to meet social studies goals outlined in the state's standard course of study. The project provided a way to engage students in their own communities, focusing on their individual lives and stories through photographs, narrative writing, and storytelling. It provided a series of experiential learning activities that encouraged the use of photography, oral history, and narrative writing in an exploration of community and citizenship. Collection includes black-and-white photographs, negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes where whites, African Americans, and Spanish-seeking citizens live. Some materials are in Spanish. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

Collection includes black-and-white photographs (a few are hand-colored), negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Materials are sorted by school, with miscellaneous or unidentified materials in the last series. Also contains electronic and audiovisual recordings that require reformatting before use.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Oral history and research collection forming the basis for Duke University undergraduate Chris D. Howard's 1983 senior honors thesis, including research notes and recorded interviews with political and civil rights leaders in Durham, North Carolina.

Collection contains Howard's research material for an honors thesis. There are fifteen envelopes of research notes, chronologically arranged. The notes concern the early history of Durham, from 1865 to the 1960s, and events related to the struggle for racial equality in Durham, N.C. The collection includes a set of 29 audiocassettes of oral interview recordings conducted by Howard, with local individuals such as Wense Grabarek, Vivian McCoy, Floyd McKissick, Conrad Pearson, Jake Phelps, Ben Ruffin, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, and others who participated in, or witnessed this struggle. There are notes and outlines of these interviews (both those on cassette tapes and others conducted by telephone) and a list of persons interviewed by Howard, Also included are copies of two papers, written by other Duke students in 1972 and 1978, about the Civil Rights Movement in Durham, N.C. during the early 1960s. Forms part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Durham county is a county in northeast central North Carolina. The county was formed in 1881. Collection materials are predominantly arranged in chronological order beginning in 1870. Within the chronology, decades are broken down by subject. Subjects include: activism, art, business, churches, clubs, courts, education, landmarks, minorities, politics, public works, publications, senior citizens, the Watts Hospital, women, YMCA/YWCA. Subject folders contain miscellaneous manuscripts and printed materials, including numerous leaflets, booklets, pamphlets, and maps.

Collection materials are predominately arranged in chronological order beginning in 1870. Within the chronology, decades are broken down by subject. Subjects include: activism, art, business, churches, clubs, courts, education, landmarks, minorities, politics, public works, publications, senior citizens, the Watts Hospital, women, YMCA/YWCA. Subject folders contain miscellaneous manuscripts and printed materials, including numerous leaflets, booklets, pamphlets, and maps. Collection is heavy in Durham Arts Council and related Durham-area arts publications and materials, workers' rights campaigns and African American political mobility. Some parts of the collection are unprocessed. Finding aid represents present ordering of folders, box labels, and box order.

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The Few family papers includes correspondence, business and financial papers, clippings, printed material, and genealogical information. The collection was created by various members of the Thomas and Few families, with the majority being created by Mary Reamey Thomas Few and her husband, Dr. William P. Few, president of Trinity College (1910-1924) and Duke University (1924-1940). The collection ranges in date from 1861-1986 (bulk 1905-1967).

The Few family papers encompass two families: the Few family and the Thomas family. The majority of the collection was created by Mary Reamey Thomas Few and her husband, Dr. William P. Few. The collection is divided into six series: Correspondence, Genealogy, Miscellaneous, Political Papers of Mary Reamey Thomas Few, Family Materials, and Duke University Materials.

The Correspondence series is broken down into several subseries based on how the correspondence was grouped by the Few family. The majority of the correspondence was written by and to members of the Few and Thomas families, including letters between Dr. and Mrs. Few prior to their marriage as well as letters from Mrs. Few to her parents while she was an undergraduate at Trinity College (Durham, N.C.). Other subjects in the correspondence series include family and business matters and social conditions in Durham, as well as letters and telegrams sent to the family after the death of William Preston Few in 1940.

The Genealogy series includes research notes and information accumulated by Mrs. Few as well as applications for membership in several historical and genealogical societies.

The Miscelleanous series includes financial and business papers, Lyne Starling Thomas' business papers, printed material, clippings, and address/memo books.

The Political Papers series consists of correspondence, memorabilia, pamphlets, clippings, photographs and printed materials amassed by Mary Reamey Thomas Few in her capacity as a leader in the Republican Party.

The Family Materials subseries contains photographs, memorabilia, business papers, clippings, certificates and diplomas, and other materials collected by William Preston Few, Mary Randolph Few, and their sons.

The Duke University Materials series contains photographs, magazines, newspaper clippings, correspondence, booklets and brochures, and other items relating to the history of Duke University and Trinity College, collected by members of the Few family, primarily Mary Reamey Thomas Few.

Many files contain handwritten notes identifying the contents, written by the family members who originally organized and identified the materials.

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John Moses photographs, 1974-1993 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 33 items — 31 prints and 2 typed manuscripts

Collection of 23 photographs taken by John Moses, pediatrician and photographer, of teenaged parents and their children, chiefly in Durham, North Carolina and surrounding communities, and eight photographs of farmworkers taken in the South. Seeking to find the "human stories behind the statistics," he photographed the adolescent parents - almost all young women - in their homes and urban surroundings. A few images include grandparents. The photographs of farm laborers were taken in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida from 1974-1979, and include portraits of children, adults, and older people of all races at work and at home; also includes one of farmworkers protesting on a road as a bus with a Minute Maid sign rolls by. The gelatin silver prints all measure 11x14 inches. Includes an index of image titles and a three-page statement by Moses about his photography and its relevance to his medical work. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 23 photographs taken by John Moses, North Carolina pediatrician and photographer, of teenaged parents and their children, chiefly in Durham, North Carolina and surrounding communities, and eight photographs of farmworkers taken in the South.

Seeking to find the "human stories behind the statistics," Moses photographed the adolescent parents - almost all young women - in their homes and urban surroundings. A few images include grandparents. The photographs of farm laborers were taken in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida from 1974-1979, and include portraits of children, adults, and older people of all races at work and at home; also includes one of farmworkers protesting on a road as a bus with a Minute Maid sign rolls by.

The gelatin silver prints all measure 11x14 inches. Includes an index of image titles and a three-page statement by Moses about his photography and its relevance to his medical work. The description mentions oral histories conducted by Moses; these audio materials are not currently part of the collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Justin Cook photographs, 2005-2016 1.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 40 prints

Collection comprises 40 color inkjet photographs taken from 2005 to 2016 in Durham, North Carolina by photographer Justin Cook. The images examine the intertwined effects of violence, gangs, homicide, incarceration, poverty and urban renewal in Durham. Their subjects include African American families and their experiences of death, loss and grieving; felons' struggles post-prison; police officers and religious leaders; and gatherings of both predominantly Caucasian and African American communities. There are also several views of the city of Durham that highlight its varied and changing architecture. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 40 color inkjet photographs taken from 2005 to 2016 in Durham, North Carolina by photographer Justin Cook. The images are a decade-long photographic look at the intertwined effects of violence, gangs, homicide, incarceration, poverty and urban renewal in Durham. In Cook's own words, "the intimate personal narratives reveal two Durhams and two Americas... While young professionals flock to one Durham and developers remake it in their image, another Durham, scarred by segregation, fights for the right to exist, and struggles to keep its young people alive." Cook's photographs have as their subjects African American families and their experiences of death, loss and grieving; felons' struggles post-prison; police officers and religious leaders; and gatherings of both predominantly Caucasian and African American communities. There are also several views of the city of Durham that highlight its varied and changing architecture.

The signed and numbered prints are arranged in a narrative order created by the photographer and are accompanied by original captions. The first 37 are from the Made in Durham zine; three extra images have been included by the photographer at the end of the collection. The prints are all 13x19 inches in size, and were printed on Epson matte photo paper.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Lesbian Health Resource Center records, 1987-2005 4.5 Linear Feet — 3375 Items

Durham-based community organization that provided health advice and workshops for lesbians. Successor to the North Carolina Lesbian and Gay Health Project, founded in 1982. The LHRC opened in 1996. Collection includes administrative materials, grant and funding applications, volunteer orientation agendas, and a resource library maintained by the LHRC during the 1990s. Topics include mental and physical health for lesbians, in particular HIV/AIDS prevention, breast cancer prevention and screenings, and safe sex practices. Also includes materials about the LHRC's plans for a Lesbian Health Clinic in North Carolina, its ongoing relationships with other community organizations, and workshop materials on feminism, health, and leadership. Membership and participation lists are closed until 2030. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The records of the LHRC are in many was a continuation of the records from the North Carolina Lesbian and Gay Health Project, also held by the Bingham Center. Early materials frequently reference or were created by NCLGHP members, and there are also overlapping interests with some resources for gay men, despite the fact that the majority of the materials are targeted towards the lesbian community and their activities in the Triangle.

The grant materials and other financial files that make up the first series include applications, correspondence, and general information about the budget of the LHRC and the grants that it sought for programs and operations. Also included in this series are materials from the 501(c)3 application, as well as some correspondence from the IRS regarding the organization's tax status.

The LHRC's Lesbian Health Clinic files detail the planning and fundraising by the organization in preparation for opening the LHC. This series includes correspondence, steering committee minutes, handouts from different fundraising and awareness events, and other notes and research about healthcare and the operation of a health clinic.

The collection's subject files are largely drawn from the LHRC Resource Library, which was maintained by the LHRC for use by its members. Topics include healthcare, particularly women's health and lesbian health; cancer, especially breast cancer; AIDS and the spread of HIV; safe sex; domestic violence; parenting; homophobia, especially within the medical community; and other topics like health reading materials or other resources.

Some of the LHRC's activities and events are documented in the fourth series, including information and planning materials from the NCGLHP's participation in the Breast Cancer Leadership Summit and subsequent breast cancer awareness events in the early 1990s. Other activities represented include North Carolina Pride Days, breastcasting, a lesbian sex group, and general healthcare workshops.

Finally, the administrative files relate to the running of the LHRC, including everything from document masters for letterhead and logos to the volunteer orientation materials from orientations as late as 2005. Also includes some information from partner organizations, including the Mautner Project, Lesbian Avengers, and local community organizations including Triange Community Works. Related to this series is the Oversize Materials series, which consists of two document masters for posters promoting awareness about breast cancer and AIDS in the lesbian community.

The Restricted series is actually just one box of material, mainly membership and participation lists, which is closed until 2030.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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The North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company Archives document the founding and development of N.C. Mutual in Durham, N.C., and contribute to the historic record on African American businesses and entrepreneurship in the South and in the United States. Dating from 1850 to 2008, with the majority of the items created from 1920 to 2008, the material covers nearly every aspect of N.C. Mutual's operations, management, and milestones. There are corporate office files, including the offices of five company presidents; annual statements; reports; surveys; memos; legal and financial papers; original life insurance policies; training material; programming and outreach files; many ephemera and artifacts; and thousands of historical photographs of staff and their families, offices, buildings, and Durham scenes. Significant businessmen represented in the papers include founders John Merrick and Aaron Moore; and presidents Bert Collins, Joseph Goodloe, William Kennedy Jr., William Kennedy, III, Charles C. Spaulding, Asa T. Spaulding, and current president James H. Speed. The collection is especially rich in print material, including many issues of three company publications: The Mutual (1903-1929), The Whetstone (1924-1998), and The Weekly Review (1925-1998). It is also notable for its assemblage of material on United States African American history, including much information on other companies, and public relations material dating from the earliest years to present times, including advertising ephemera, advertising campaigns, and other related items. Other materials document NCM's outreach to the African American community throughout its history to counter racism, unemployment, and diseases by means of public health programs, church affiliations, mentoring, and scholarship programs. Over one hundred selected digitized photographs and a few documents are also available online. Acquired and curated jointly by the North Carolina Central University's University Archives, Records and History Center and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The records in the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company Archives document the history of the oldest currently active African American insurance company in the United States. The materials date from 1850 to 2008, with the majority of the items dating from 1898 to 2008, and cover nearly all aspects concerning the operation, management, and milestones of NC Mutual (NCM). The archive comprises corporate office files, including the offices of five company presidents; annual statements, reports, surveys, and memos; legal and financial files; original life insurance policies and other documents; advertising, internal and external publications, pamphlets, posters, and other print material; training material; many historic photographs; public relations and outreach material; memorabilia; and audiovisual recordings. The bulk of the collection concerns the company's home office in Durham, N.C. but there is a significant amount of material that relates to NCM district offices located throughout the United States, particularly in the South, as well as records that refer to other related organizations such as insurance companies and financial institutions.

The collection contributes significantly to documentation on the history of African American businesses in the United States, particularly in the South, and on the socioeconomic status of African Americans in the South in the 20th century. There is also valuable information on public health issues affecting 20th-century African Americans and public health programming created by NC Mutual as well as other agencies. In addition, through company records and many ephemeral publications such as obituaries, the collection offers detailed documentation of the work status and personal lives of the company's many employees and their life insurance customers, predominantly African American women and men.

The collection is rich in print materials, and includes nearly complete runs of three company publications: The Mutual (1903-1929), The Whetstone (1924-1998), and The Weekly Review (1925-1998). It is also notable for public relations materials dating from the earliest years to the mid-2000s, including advertising ephemera, materials related to advertising campaigns, and other items. Additionally, there are records of NCM's extensive community outreach such as public health, mentoring, and scholarship programs, and documents relating to the company's ties with Durham's churches such as White Rock Baptist, and with other organizations such as Mechanics and Farmers Bank.

Corporate office files form the bulk of the collection, covering nearly every aspect of the company's operations and activities from its founding in 1898. There are extensive correspondence files as well as meeting notes and minutes, many legal and financial reports, and surveys of the insurance industry. Materials relating to a published history of NCM written by one of its presidents, William Kennedy Jr., are located in the Office of the Presidents Series. Company presidents represented most substantially in the files include: William Kennedy Jr. (1952-1958), Asa T. Spaulding (1959-1967), Joseph Goodloe (1968-1972), William Kennedy III (1972-1990), and Bert Collins (1990-2003). Earlier and later presidents and leaders, including founders Merrick and Moore, and presidents C.C. Spaulding and James Speed are also represented in smaller amounts of material. Personnel records are also present and are closed to use until 2074, 75 years after the date of most recent record.

Among the several thousand photographs in the collection, hundreds date from the first decades following the company's founding, and offer important and vivid historical evidence concerning NCM's history, its employees and their families, and the history of Durham, N.C. Many are oversize, and feature twenty panoramic photographs of conventions and other events from the early to mid-20th century. The collection also contains photographs of founders Merrick and Moore and their families, NC Mutual office buildings throughout its history, and many large photographic portraits of senior administration from the earliest years to the mid-2000s. Other photos capture employees at banquets and conventions throughout the company's history; some large sets of images from the early to mid-20th century document employee's homes as well. From the historic photographs and other images not represented in the collection, NCM created a permanent exhibit in its home office's "Heritage Hall" commemorating the company's history; these exhibit images, panels, and labels are also preserved in this collection.

Acquired and jointly curated by the North Carolina Central University's University Archives, Records, and History Center, and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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OutRight records, 1983-1995 5.25 Linear Feet

OutRight is a Triangle-area organization that was founded in 1990 and is now disbanded. OutRight provided support for gay youth and other young people with questions about their sexual orientation. The OutRight records consist of meeting minutes, correspondence, financial records, resources and programs (including clippings, flyers, and pamphlets), and literature on AIDS and sexuality. The materials also include reports on nationwide trends and LGBTQ issues.

The OutRight Records chiefly consist of minutes from meetings, correspondence, financial records, publicity (including clippings, flyers, and pamphlets), and literature on AIDS and sexuality. Also included are reports on nationwide trends and LGBTQ issues, the organization's by-laws, fundraising, correspondence, program planning, and administrative information.