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Aden Field is an author and poet from Durham, North Carolina, who co-founded the Regulator along with other Durham community organizations. This collection consists of his journals, writings, postcard collections, community projects and files, and his collection of correspondence and writings from friends and family. It documents his friendships and relationships, Durham community events and activities, and his career as a writer and teacher in North Carolina.

This collection includes Field's correspondence, writings, journals, postcard binders, and files from his management and work at The Regulator, Collaborations, Black Mountain Project, Urban Hiker, and several local arts councils and youth writing programs. Materials have been sorted into series but largely remain labeled and foldered according to Field's own arrangement scheme.

Field's Journals Series contain incredibly detailed chapters of his life, which were created and re-typed by Field as a project in the 1990s. Early journals are volumes 1-4; he began titling them in the 1980s. Entries include his daily activities, Durham news, horoscope (I Ching), financial spending, and introspective analysis of his thoughts, writings, and relationships. Binders are dated and sorted by date, YYMMDD.

Field's postcard binders project began in the 1990s to assemble a Book of Men, featuring postcards of images of men in art from art galleries around the world. Other binders he created included postcards documenting American society and culture from the nineteenth century through the 1990s. He also created a Book of Women and collected assorted postcards that remain unassembled into binders, all held in this series.

Field's writings range from poetry to plays to prose, and the Writings Series includes drafts and published versions arranged in both chronological and alphabetical files. The chron files are dated YYMMDD. The alphabetical files are arranged by title.

Field's many businesses and projects are sorted by group name, with some groups' files containing only one or two items and some groups filling an entire box (see especially Collaborations, The Regulator, and Urban Hiker). These files include correspondence, publications, board minutes, notes by Field, and account ledgers. Field served as treasurer for many Durham organizations. Personal tax and investment information has been removed when identified.

The Name and Correspondence Files document Field's personal relationships and his communications as an author and community activist. Files are not strictly correspondence; some include artwork, writings, and publications, including zines and newsletters. Materials are filed by author/creator.

Finally, Field's personal materials include childhood and adolescent scrapbooks and yearbooks; photographs and snapshots with friends and family; headshots and portraits of Field; and personal accounting and financial ledgers.

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Alvin T. Parnell photographs of Durham, North Carolina, circa 1898-1986, bulk 1910-1960 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 183 items — 2 boxes; 183 items

Alvin T. Parnell was a commercial photographer based in Durham, N.C. Collection chiefly consists of 167 black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority, chiefly taken by Parnell from 1920 through the 1950s, are views of downtown streets, commercial and industrial buildings, churches, and infrastructure, especially transportation. Many sites are related to the tobacco manufacturing businesses based in Durham. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. Other images range widely and include a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, a minstrel band, a cart advertising Bull Durham tobacco, and tobacco fields with posed workers, white and African American. In addition, there are portraits of prominent Durham individuals and families. Formats include 85 vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, chiefly 8x10 inches, 82 contact prints, and 12 safety negatives. Includes an information folder with 1986 obituary and collection information.

Collection comprises 167 early to mid-20th century black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority of the images were taken by Alvin T. Parnell, a commercial photographer with a studio in downtown Durham, from about 1920 to 1950; prints from 1898 to 1919 likely were from the Cole-Holladay studio, which Parnell took over around 1920. Formats include a few vintage mounted albumen and gelatin silver prints, unmounted vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, and small contact prints made from original nitrate negatives. There are also twelve safety film negatives present, from which some copy prints were made. Includes an information folder with Parnell's 1986 obituary and collection information.

The largest group of photographs, taken from the late 1910s through the early 1950s, features views of Durham's growing downtown, often commissioned by Parnell's business and City Hall clients. In the background of the many street scenes one can see the progression of small storefront businesses that made up life on Main Street in a 20th century Southern Piedmont city. Given Durham's role as a birthplace for the post-Civil War tobacco manufacturing industry, it is not surprising that there are numerous photographs of buildings and industrial sites belonging to American Tobacco, Blackwell Tobacco, and Liggett Myers. Parnell also photographed buses, trolleys, and other scenes for an early Durham power and transportation company, Durham Public Services.

Other images focus on people, and range widely in subject matter: men posed at a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, fraternities, children on a playground, and a minstrel band. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. There are also portraits of prominent individuals and families: an elderly Bennehan Cameron with family members; John Ruffin Green (one of Durham's earliest tobacco entrepreneurs); Washington Duke and sons with associates at a barbeque; the Rosenstein family (optometrists from New York who came to Durham in 1904); William Umstead (U.S. Senator from northern Durham County); and various police chiefs and businessmen. There are also a few portraits of women, some with captions and some unidentified.

There are also twelve safety film negatives in the collection, sized 8x10 and 4x5 inches, from which a selection of copy prints were made after the collection was acquired. A few have no existing prints – these are noted in the collection guide.

In addition to photographs in this collection, some if not most of the earlier images of Durham in the Durham Chamber of Commerce collection in the Rubenstein Library are likely to have been taken by Parnell. His work is also likely to be found in other collections related to Durham residents containing photographs.

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The Behind the Veil Oral History Project was undertaken by Duke University's Lyndhurst Center for Documentary Studies in 1990. It seeks to record and preserve the living memory of African-American life during the age of legal segregation in the American South, from the 1890s to the 1950.

The Behind the Veil: Documenting African-American Life in the Jim Crow South Records span the years 1940-1997 (bulk 1993-1997) and are comprised chiefly of interviews recorded on cassette tapes. The 1260 interviews, 1993-1997, in this collection cover a number of topics related to African-American life in the 20th century with a focus on the age of southern segregation. The collection includes interviews with people from Albany, Ga.; Fargo, Ark.; Birmingham and Tuskegee, Ala.; Charlotte, Durham, Enfield, New Bern and Wilmington, N. C.; LeFlore County, Miss.; Memphis, Tenn.; Muhlenburg County, Ky.; New Iberia and New Orleans, La.; Norfolk, Va.; Columbia, Orangeburg, St. Helena, and Summerton, S. C.; and Tallahassee, Fla. In addition to interviews conducted specifically for the Behind the Veil project, the collection includes six interviews from the James City Historical Society, Craven County, N.C. as well as eight interviews conducted by Paul Ortiz in Tallahassee, Fla., in the summer of 1997 as part of his dissertation research.

The collection includes duplicate sets of approximately 1700 interview tapes. The Master Tapes Series is closed except for appropriate use by authorized staff from the Behind the Veil project and the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The Use Tapes Series contains copies of the tapes for use by researchers. The Printed Materials Series provides biographical information about informants, interview agreement forms, proper names sheets, and brief summaries (one-three pages) of each of the 1260 interviews. Also included are some personal papers, the earliest of which is dated 1940. The Transcripts Series currently includes unverified transcripts of 314 interviews in the collection. These transcripts are also available as electronic documents. A disk directory log exists. Contact Research Services staff for more information. More transcripts will be available each semester.

The Behind the Veil collection will eventually include approximately 5100 photographs and slides. This Visual Materials Series will contain items donated by informants and others in the communities where Behind the Veil field-workers conducted interviews. The vast majority of these pictures show family and community members at home or at special events. A smaller number portray buildings and other local places. Images of political events are notably rare in the collection. We also anticipate the eventual addition of the Behind the Veil project's papers, which will be held as the Administrative Files Series.

Behind the Veil interviewers were provided with a list of Interview Questions before they entered the field. Although most interviews in the collection do not follow the list question by question, the list provides a useful research guide to the type of inquiry many interviews follow. The list of questions is included as an appendix in this guide. Frequently discussed topics include family history, local neighborhoods, educational background, employment history, religious institutions, experiences of segregation, local political activities, civic organizations and activities, black-owned businesses and local culture. Behind the Veil informants represent a number of occupational groups, including domestic workers, educators, homemakers, health professionals, manufacturing workers, miners, ministers, political figures, professionals and servicemen.

Database:

A Behind the Veil Database, created by Alex X. Byrd, will soon accompany the collection. The fields included are in two categories: Informant and Circumstance of Interview. The Informant fields are Last Name, First Name, Middle or Maiden Name, Sex, Zip Code, Date of Birth, Place of Birth, and Principal Occupations. The Circumstance of Interview fields are Date of Interview, Location of Interview, Processing Subseries, and Interviewers. The other fields are: was the informant part of a group interview?; has the interview been transcribed?; if part of a group interview, under whose name is the material filed?; number of tapes for interview.

Consult reference staff concerning the availability of the database.

The addition (acc# 2001-0183)(100 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) includes a course syllabus, interviews of African-American North Carolinians on cassette tapes, some student self-evaluations, contracts, indices, and transcript excerpts. The area most represented is Durham, N.C. Students were to aim for insight into how African-Americans built communities during an age of racial oppression. The interviews include much information about family history and social and community issues.

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Caroline Vaughan photographs, 1977-1992 6 Linear Feet — 5 boxes; 64 items — 63 prints; one brochure

Collection comprises 63 exhibit-quality black-and-white photographic portraits of Durham, North Carolina citizens of all races, ages, genders, and sexual orientations, taken from 1989 to 1992 for a Center for Documentary Studies project. Subjects include activists, writers, older people, working class men, friends, couples, and families. Many of the individuals were alumni of Duke University. Also includes several prints and a brochure from an exhibit entitled "Home Ground," featuring Vaughan's family and landscapes from two family farms, 1977-1987. Formats include gelatin silver, Polaroids (some in color), and four palladium/plantinotype prints, along with a hand-pigmented, textured print. The photographs range in size from about 8 3/8 x 10 3/4 inches to 11x14 inches and are all matted, captioned, and signed. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection chiefly comprises 63 exhibit-quality black-and-white photographic portraits of Durham, North Carolina citizens of all races, ages, genders, and sexual orientations, taken by Durham photographer Caroline Vaughan from 1989 to 1992 for a Center for Documentary Studies project. Subjects include activists, writers, older people, working class men, gay and straight couples, friends, and families, Many of the individuals were alumni of Duke University who were involved in sixties activism and remained in the area.

There are several photographers featured in the portraits whose work is also in the Rubenstein Library collections: Peter Goin, Alex Harris, Jeeva Rajgopaul, and Margaret Sartor.

Also includes a smaller series of black-and-white palladium/platinotype prints and a bifold brochure from a Duke University exhibit entitled "Home Ground." These prints feature Vaughan's family members posed in the studio and at two family farms in Oxford, N.C. and News Ferry, Virginia, taken from 1977 to 1987 and printed in 1992 and 1993.

The photographs were taken with large-format cameras and an instant camera (Polaroid), and printed and toned by Vaughan chiefly from 1990 to 1993. Formats include gelatin silver, Polaroids (some in color), and palladium/plantinotype prints, along with one hand-pigmented, textured print. The prints range in size from about 8 3/8 x 10 3/4 inches to 11 x 14 inches and are printed on a variety of papers. Some of the palladium prints feature a circular image format. With a few exceptions, the prints are signed, dated, and matted. Titles were taken from original captions inscribed by the photographer on the prints or mats. Some titles for some uncaptioned prints were taken from the photographer's online gallery. Many prints have data on exposure times, shutter, speed, and other data marked on the back.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The collection houses work created by students enrolled in documentary studies courses at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. The student projects focus primarily on exploring and documenting the social lives and experiences of people living in and around rural and urban areas of Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina, through photography or oral history. Subjects include but are not limited to local school environments; churches and religious life; ethnic communities and neighborhoods; war veterans; the 9/11 attacks; the labor and civil rights movements as experienced by local individuals; students at Duke University; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; beauty pageants; local music scenes; and the built environment and culture of North Carolina towns, and cities. Audiovisual materials include sound recordings and moving images, and may require reformatting before contents can be accessed. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection houses photographs, interviews, essays, and other documentary works created by students enrolled in courses or thesis projects on documentary studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), from 1980 to 2011. Most of the student projects focus on the social life and customs of persons living in and around Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina. Themes include life in cities and towns, particularly in Durham; rural life; schools and other institutions such as churches and retirement homes, and charitable organizations such as soup kitchens and orphanages; community centers such as stores, daycares, and laundromats; African American communities and neighborhoods, particularly in Durham; beauty pageants; local music; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; midwives; the 9/11 attacks in New York City; and Duke University students and campus life. One series of images portrays the Chuck Davis African American Dance Ensemble in Durham. Oral histories of N.C. civil rights and labor activists, American war veterans, and other individuals are associated with certain courses.

The majority of projects focus on Durham area locales, but other cities and towns in N.C. documented include Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Seagrove, Wanchese, Cane Creek, Oxford, Carrboro, Orange Factory, Rougemont, Saxapahaw, Salisbury, Northside, Corinth, and Cedar Grove. There are a few projects based in Virginia, and summer projects located in Massachusetts, Tennessee, Tel-Aviv, and France.

The collection also includes a few grant-supported projects by professional documentarians Eric Green, Kate Rhodenbaugh, Carolina Wang, and Donna Lennard, and photographic work by Bill Bamberger, a faculty member at Duke.

Black-and-white prints make up the majority of formats, but there are also many slides. The more recent additions increasingly include oral histories on audio cassettes and CD-ROMS and other project-related digital media. These are marked in the folder descriptions. Original audiovisual and electronic media are closed to use and may require the production of use copies before they can be accessed.

The courses were all sponsored by the Center for Documentary Photography, which in 1989 changed its name to the Center for Documentary Studies. Among the faculty teaching courses for the Center for Documentary Studies are noted documentarians Bill Bamberger, John Biewen, David Cecelski, Alex Harris, and Margaret Sartor, some of whom have contributed their own documentary work to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Durham county is a county in northeast central North Carolina. The county was formed in 1881. Collection materials are predominantly arranged in chronological order beginning in 1870. Within the chronology, decades are broken down by subject. Subjects include: activism, art, business, churches, clubs, courts, education, landmarks, minorities, politics, public works, publications, senior citizens, the Watts Hospital, women, YMCA/YWCA. Subject folders contain miscellaneous manuscripts and printed materials, including numerous leaflets, booklets, pamphlets, and maps.

Collection materials are predominately arranged in chronological order beginning in 1870. Within the chronology, decades are broken down by subject. Subjects include: activism, art, business, churches, clubs, courts, education, landmarks, minorities, politics, public works, publications, senior citizens, the Watts Hospital, women, YMCA/YWCA. Subject folders contain miscellaneous manuscripts and printed materials, including numerous leaflets, booklets, pamphlets, and maps. Collection is heavy in Durham Arts Council and related Durham-area arts publications and materials, workers' rights campaigns and African American political mobility. Some parts of the collection are unprocessed. Finding aid represents present ordering of folders, box labels, and box order.

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The Durham Traditional Arts Survey was conducted in the early 2000s as part of the Document Durham project within the Community Programs department at the Center for Documentary Studies. Participants consisted of folklorists and photographers who traveled through Durham County, attempting to document the diversity of various communities by focusing on traditional artists within those communities. One outcome of the DTAS was the Home Made Visible: Durham 2002 exhibition, which highlighted Durham traditional arts and crafts. Includes fieldwork reports, interview tapes, slides, photographs, and other documentary material from the research and observations conducted by participants in the Durham Traditional Arts Survey Project. Durham communities and artists represented in the project include African American, African immigrants, Latino, Middle Eastern, Jewish, South Indian, and Asian, as well as occupational traditions and rural community traditions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Includes fieldwork reports, interview tapes, slides, photographs, and other documentary material from the research and observations conducted by participants in the Durham Traditional Arts Survey Project. Durham communities and artists represented in the project include African American, African immigrants, Latino, Middle Eastern, Jewish, South Indian, and Asian, as well as occupational traditions and rural community traditions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Hugh Mangum photographs, circa 1890-1922 10 Linear Feet — 38 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 1141 items

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Hugh Mangum was a commercial portrait photographer from Durham, North Carolina. Collection contains 937 glass plate negatives and printed black-and-white photographs taken by Mangum from about 1890 to 1922 as he traveled a rail circuit through North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia and in photography studios he and partners established in Roanoke, Pulaski, and East Radford, Virginia. The images are chiefly individual and group portraits of residents in those areas - women, children, and men, either in a studio setting or outdoors. The majority are white men and women, but there are also many African Americans. Some people have been identified; Mangum and his wife are present in several images. There are several street scenes from Radford, as well as Warrenton (probably N.C.), and Christiansburg, Virginia. Of the photographic prints, there are 55 prints made from selected negatives, and 50 inkjet digital prints from a 2012 exhibit. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Hugh Mangum Photographs collection dates from approximately 1890 through 1922, and contains 937 glass plate negatives and a selection of black-and-white prints, of portraits and scenes taken by Hugh Mangum, a portrait photographer based in Durham, North Carolina. There is also a set of 25 exhibit prints and 25 smaller viewing prints from a 2012 Center for Documentary Studies exhibit curated by a Duke University student.

The images were taken as Mangum traveled a rail circuit through North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. He also likely took some of these images in the photography studios he and partners established in Roanoke, Pulaski, and East Radford, Virginia. Communities marked on a few of the plates include Warrenton (probably North Carolina rather than Virginia), and Christiansburg, Virginia. Localities known to have been visited by Mangum in N.C. include Winston-Salem, High Point, Raleigh, Reidsville, Lexington, Durham, and Greensboro; in Virginia, Martinsville, East Radford, and Pulaski. From an annotated trunk lid found in the collection it seems he also visited Texas but it is unknown if any of the images in the collection were taken there.

The images are chiefly individual and group portraits of local residents, although there are several town scenes with landmark buildings. There are women, children, and men, either in a studio setting or outdoors; the majority are white but there are many African Americans. There are buildings such as barns, schools, and houses often present in the group portraits, and in many cases there are dogs, chickens, cats, and horses. Sometimes the individual poses with a possession such as a bicycle or musical instrument. One image is of a train accident with a large group of bystanders. Often numbers are stamped or written on the plate. The library staff has assigned unique numbers to each image and plate. There are multiple images of Hugh Mangum and the Mangum and Carden families; see the glass plate negative notes below for more details. The last dated print in the collection is a mounted print of Mangum's body in an open casket, 1922.

Mangum photographs are distinctive for the level of comfort exhibited by his subjects in front of the camera. This ease in front of the camera is readily noted due to the large quantity of "penny picture camera" negatives in the collection that contain multiple images of numerous subjects. Often the first picture of a subject appears rather stiff and formal as in traditional nineteenth century photographs. In the second and subsequent pictures, the subject often visibly relaxes, assumes different poses, uses props, removes or adds a hat, and may smile broadly at the camera. This progressive transition in poses from formal to very informal is a hallmark of the Mangum collection. The collection may be of particular interest to researchers studying late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century fashion trends.

The glass plate negatives are closed to use, but researchers may use online digitized images which represent the entirety of the collection of negatives. In addition, the collection also makes available for research use original contact prints, contact sheets, one panoramic print, and print reproductions created for exhibition and other purposes.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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"Phone Home Durham" exhibit prints, 2012-2015 and undated 2 Linear Feet — 3 boxes; 85 13x19 inch inkjue prints; 43 manuscript items

Collection comprises 85 13x19 inch photographic prints and other documents related to the exhibit, "Phone Home Durham, 2015." The images were all taken by 50 residents of Durham County, North Carolina, chiefly with mobile phones but also with handheld cameras, and are mostly color digital prints, with a few black-and-white prints. The photographers focused on urban settings, although there are a few rural images taken in Durham County. The images reflect society and customs in 21st century Durham, with subject content including protests relating to race issues, street scenes, graffiti, abandoned houses, local shops and businesses, industrial buildings, and a few landscapes with trees and sunsets. The exhibit prints are accompanied by exhibit guides and other publicity related to the 2015 exhibition, several photographers' statements, and the original exhibit proposal by Duke University professor and photographer Tom Rankin. The exhibit was co-curated by Aaron Canipe, Alexa Dilworth, Jeremy Lange, and Jim Lee. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection comprises 85 13x19 inch inkjet prints of photographs, chiefly in color, taken by 50 photographers from Durham County, North Carolina. The images were selected from submissions to the Center for Documentary Studies in response to a call for "images of Durham County [N.C.] taken with mobile phone cameras or other hand held devices." The size of the actual image on the 13x19 print varies and can be as small as 4x6 inches.

The photographers focused on urban settings, although there are a few rural images taken in Durham County. The images reflect society and customs in 21st century Durham, with subject content including protests relating to race issues, street scenes, graffiti, abandoned houses, local shops and businesses, industrial buildings, and a few landscapes with trees and sunsets. Locations include the Durham History Hub, Museum of Life and Science, Duke University, Liberty Cafe, Taqueria Gonzales, Geer Street, Eno River State Park, Ellerbee Creek bridge, Pelican Snoballs, Catsburg Store, the beaver pond off of Avondale Drive, Compare Foods, Durham Central Park, Cocoa Cinnamon coffee shop, Durham County Detention Facility, West Chapel Hill Street bridge, Beyu Cafe, the Durham Bulls ballpark, the 40th Centerfest, El Vaquero Western Wear Shop, 21c Museum Hotel, and the Scrap Exchange.

The exhibit was guest curated by Aaron Canipe, Alexa Dilworth, Jeremy Lange and Jim Lee and displayed in different rotations at the Power Plant Gallery at the American Tobacco Campus from May 29, 2015 to August 22, 2015.

The photographic prints are accompanied by five exhibit guides arranged by dates of exhibition, with thumbnails of each image, the photographer's name, and captions or additional information. Other documents are a flyer explaining request for submissions, a Durham County Library program flyer, and photographers' statements about their images. Also located here is the proposal for the exhibit written by Tom Rankin, documentary photographer and Director of the Master of Fine Arts Program at Duke University.

The following photographers are represented in the collection: D.L. Anderson, Kristina Baker, Daniele Berman, Eric Boven, Michaela Brooks, Aaron Canipe, Mario Chen, Christina Chia, Ira Christmas, Olisa Corcoran, Diane Davis, Wilfred Drath, B.J. Fusaro, Roman Gabriel, Alexa Gerend, Cynthia Gurganus, Izzy (Isaac) Hart, Jim Haverkamp, Warren Hicks, Juliet Jensen, Jim Kellough, Frank Konhaus, Stephanie Leathers, Ryan Mason, Mark Maya, Eleanor Mills, Jesse Moore, John Moses, Callistus Ndemo, Michael Palko, Bill Pope, Courtney Reid-Eaton, Julie Rhodes, Jacqueline Rimmler, Emily Rush, Katherine Scott, Adelle Smith, Amanda Smith, Daniel Smith, Lisa Sorg, Jennifer Stratton, Gina Streaty, Amanda Stricklett, Dawn Surratt, Lynda-Marie Taurasi, Aiyana Torres, Cait Ushpol, Ross Wade, Carin Walsh, and Josh Zaslow.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Youth Document Durham and Durham Works were programs sponsored by Duke University and the Center for Documentary Studies that brought together young people ages 12–16 from diverse Durham communities to document their lives, local history, and contemporary social issues through photography, oral history, and narrative writing. The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works project records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the history and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Many of the students are African American or Hispanic and their topics often highlight social conditions and race relations in African American and Hispanic communities in Durham neighborhoods and in a few other locations, including South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of oral interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, documented through audiocassette recordings, photographs, writings, and some transcripts, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for the program from its beginnings through 2008. There is also a database created by Center for Documentary Studies staff that records the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews. This data also contains restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works program records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the histories and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Although the vast majority of the projects focus on Durham, there is also one project based in South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The collection is divided into four series: Interviews, Photographic Material, Project Files, and Additions.

The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for those years. The contents of each series is described in full below. There is also a Community Stories database that houses the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews, and restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist.

The Interviews Series forms the bulk of the collection, and houses the materials generated by the student projects. Each session was organized around a topic which usually would be repeated in subsequent years, such as "Durham Works" or "Old Five Points." Folders usually house one set of interviews conducted by one or more students, and contents typically consist of one or more cassette tapes of the oral interviews, consent forms and other documentation about the interviewees, and writings by the students that came out of their experiences as interviewers. Some interviews have been transcribed. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; viewing or listening copies need to be made before contents can be accessed. Folders are arranged in number order as assigned by Center for Documentary Studies Staff; they are not in chronological order. An alternate listing at the end of this collection inventory groups boxes by project title rather than folder number order.

In addition to oral histories and writings, the students also produced many images of their subjects and their communities. Photographic prints and negatives of their work are housed in the Photographic Materials Series. Students also produced poems and drawings, and these are chiefly found in the Project Files Series.

Supporting program materials - curriculum guides, notes on staff meetings, staff guidelines, assessments of outcomes - are found in the Project Files Series. Also housed here are additional photographic images, mostly of the project students and staff, CDs with final projects, and the many publications that came out of the Center for Documentary Studies program. These booklets contain mostly interview transcriptions but also include photographs, drawings, annotations, and poetry. Also included is a retrospective collection of Youth Document Durham participant photos and essays, edited by Hong-An Truong and published in 2005.

Later accessions to the collections are found in the Additions Series. These items consist of audiovisual materials, photographs, and some printed materials. In addition to the Youth Document Durham project, related projects included in the Additions series are the Youth Treatment Court, which seems to have been a division of Youth Document Durham, and the Connect Program, which included projects from Old Five Points as well as special group projects for youth.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.