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Cataloged from item. Collection comprises a diary (124 pgs.) maintained by an unidentified woman who was educated, knowledgeable about sailing, and quite religious, during her voyages and travels around the northern coast of Scotland to cities in Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, England, France, and Spain.

Collection comprises a diary (124 pgs.) maintained by an unidentified woman who was educated, knowledgeable about sailing, and quite religious, during her voyages and travels around the northern coast of Scotland to cities in Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, England, France, and Spain. The diary began with a business trip, when she accompanied her husband (who was likely captain of the unnamed ship), from Workington, Eng., to Horten, Norway, in order to deliver a cargo of rails to the Norwegian government. The rest of the travel was apparently for pleasure. The author described ocean and weather conditions, with emphasis on dangers for ships; lighthouses; shipwrecks; landscapes; architecture; historic sites and ruins; castles; cathedrals and churches; palaces; paintings, sculptures, and artists; bridges and engineers; and gardens. She also commented on the inhabitants of and various practices in individual European countries, often in comparison to England, and with a particular focus on the women in each country. She made occasional literary references. More often she interwove her Evangelical beliefs into her descriptions, with references to the resurrection of the dead, comments on Protestant denominations, and strongly worded anti-Catholic sentiments. Includes visits to William Thorburn, who was then British Consul to Sweden; Antwerp's Cathedral of Our Lady; Waterloo battlefield; the Norman Cathedral at Durham; and the Castle site at Newcastle.

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George E. Scott papers, 1854-1910 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — approx. 721 Items

Correspondence, photographs, printed material, legal papers, and a journal, relating to the personal and business life of George E. Scott, buyer and seller of lumber in Ala. and Fla. Some material also concerns the Perdido Bay Lumber Company in Pensacola, Fla. Includes a journal Scott kept (1873-1874) while on a ship carrying lumber and naval stores from Boston to Florida. Also includes two years of courtship letters while Scott was in England.

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The Morris and Dorothy Margolin film collection dates from 1947 to 1982 and includes twenty-five 16mm and seven Super 8 motion picture films created by Morris Margolin, chiefly documenting Morris and Dorothy's international travels. The films include footage from Pakistan, Bulgaria, Ethiopia, and Kenya -- rare destinations for Western travelers in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. Highlights include an abundance of images of the Soviet Union and Israel, and images of Capetown documenting the apartheid years. All of the films are color, and a few include sound elements such as narration, music, or even sound effects. The collection also includes a handful of home movies that document family trips and events such as graduations and birthdays, and one film that appears to be a professionally produced documentary about the Soviet Union. The films are complemented by over 4,000 color slides of still images taken during their travels. The collection, arranged chronologically, also includes Digital Betacam preservation tapes, DVD masters and DVD use copies.

The Morris and Dorothy Margolin Film Collection includes 32 home movies that capture the Margolins' travels between 1947 and 1976. Destinations represented in the collection include Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Denmark, England, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Greece, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jamaica, Kenya, Majorca, Monaco, Morocco, Norway, Pakistan, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Scotland, South Africa, the Soviet Union, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, and Yugoslavia. All of the films are in color, and a few include sound.

Also included is a handful of home movies that document family trips and events such as graduations and birthdays, and one film that appears to be a professionally produced documentary about the Soviet Union acquired by the Margolins during their travels.

Particularly notable is the adventurous nature of many of the countries visited, such as the Soviet Union, Pakistan, Bulgaria, Ethiopia, and Kenya -- rare destinations for Western travelers in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. The films are also noteworthy because Morris often trained his camera on his surroundings, recording everyday life as well as architectural and geographical features of the countries he visited. His wife Dorothy also makes frequent appearances in the films.

The films are complemented by over 4,000 color slides taken in most of these same countries from 1959 to 1982. Of particular interest are images from the former Soviet Union and Israel, both from the mid-1960s, images of South Africa during apartheid, as well as early images of France, Italy, and Thailand.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Postcard collection, 1893-2010s 87 Linear Feet — 65,750 Items

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Collection contains postcards acquired at various times by the Rubenstein Library at Duke. Collection is organized into three main categories--International, United States, and Miscellaneous. The International postcards are arranged by country and include cards from France, Italy, Canada, England, Germany, Japan, Spain, and Russia. The collection includes a set of early 20th century postcards from Thessaloniki (also known as Salonica and Selanik), Greece. The United States postcards cover many states, with large numbers from North Carolina and Virginia. The Miscellaneous category contains postcards with different subjects, including modes of transportation, food, tourism, agriculture, wars and battles, heads of state, flowers and plants, advertising, love and friendship, Confederate memorials, poetry, and animals. There are cards intended to be humorous, as well as cards depicting racist stereotypes and caricatures of African American and Native American people. Also included is a series of postcards with images relating to European artists.

Collection contains postcards acquired at various times by the Rubenstein Library at Duke. Collection is organized into three main categories--International, United States, and Miscellaneous. The International postcards are arranged by country and include cards from France, Italy, Canada, England, Germany, Japan, Spain, and Russia. The collection includes a set of early 20th century postcards from Thessaloniki (also known as Salonica and Selanik), Greece. The United States postcards cover many states, with large numbers from North Carolina and Virginia. The Miscellaneous category contains postcards with different subjects, including modes of transportation, food, tourism, agriculture, wars and battles, heads of state, flowers and plants, advertising, love and friendship, Confederate memorials, poetry, and animals. There are cards intended to be humorous, as well as cards depicting racist stereotypes and caricatures of African American and Native American people. Also included is a series of postcards with images relating to European artists.

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Robert Leslie papers, 1783-1934 and undated, bulk 1814-1872 23.7 Linear Feet — Approximately 15,398 Items

Merchant, of Petersburg, Va. Correspondence, accounts, invoices, statements, and legal papers (chiefly 1814-1872) of Leslie, a member of the Virginia mercantile firm of Leslie and Shepherd, and a slave owner. The papers before 1819 largely concern the processing and sale of cotton, tobacco, rice, and western lands. Most of the papers after 1819 pertain to tobacco manufacture in the Richmond-Petersburg area. Other topics include Leslie's career, family, and travels in England; his western landholdings and efforts to develop the West; his slaveholding and attitude toward it; mercantile prices and U.S.-British trade; and absentee landlordship referring to the maintenance of American property owned by Englishmen. Later material includes scattered correspondence and business papers of Leslie's nephews, Robert L. Watson and John McGill, whom Leslie had admitted to partnership in the firm.

Correspondence, accounts, invoices, statements, and legal papers, chiefly spanning the years 1814-1872, of Robert Leslie, a member of the Virginia mercantile firm of Leslie and Shepherd, and a slave owner. The papers before 1819 largely concern the processing and sale of cotton, tobacco, rice, and western lands. Most of the papers after 1819 pertain to tobacco manufacture in the Richmond-Petersburg area. Other topics include Leslie's career, family, and travels in England; his western landholdings and efforts to develop the West; his slaveholding and attitude toward it; mercantile prices and U.S.-British trade; and absentee landlordship referring to the maintenance of American property owned by Englishmen. Later material includes scattered correspondence and business papers of Leslie's nephews, Robert L. Watson and John McGill, whom Leslie had admitted to partnership in the firm.

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Robert Newton Page papers, 1892-1930, bulk 1916-1920 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 2,764 Items

Bank president and U.S. Representative from North Carolina. Correspondence, clippings, and other papers (largely 1916-1920) relating chiefly to Page's resignation from Congress and his 1920 North Carolina gubernatorial campaign. Includes information on Page's congressional career, as well as letter from Page's brother, Walter Hines Page, while ambassador to England describing the English countryside and his activities as ambassador. Correspondents include Claude Kitchin, Angus Wilton McLean, and Charles Manly Stedman.

The papers in this collection deal largely with Page's resignation from Congress and his gubernatorial race in 1920. Most of the letters were written before his defeat in the first primary in 1920. The clippings deal exclusively with that race. The printed material contains not only papers of a political nature but also literature of the first World War period urging the purchase of War Savings Stamps.

The letter book (1916) is comprised solely of telegrams and letters which both oppose and applaud Page's refusal to seek re-election to Congress because Wilson had asked Congress to make the decision as to whether or not American citizens should be warned to stay off vessels of belligerent countries, which decision he thought Wilson should make himself. In 1916 Page wrote to his constituents explaining his stand and stating that the large loan to England by American capitalists and the profits of munition makers had destroyed even the semblance of neutrality in the U.S.

The letters from his constituents begin in 1904. In 1916 some of them wrote Page to oppose preparedness. On July 22, 1914 Page's brother, Walter Hines, then ambassador to England, wrote from a country house out from London which they had rented for three months. He speaks of the beauty of the English countryside, the life of an ambassador to England, his approval of what that session of Congress had done, and his close relations with the British Foreign Office (claims he induced the British government to keep quiet about Mexico).

Among the other papers, there is an invitation to a prohibition banquet in December 1916; a 1916 report on what had been accomplished among the natives of Alaska with the appropriations granted to the Bureau of Education by Congress; 1918 report of the N. C. Council of Defense to Gov. Thomas W. Bickett on its first year of war work; letters in 1918 and 1919 from people pledging their support to Page as a candidate for the governorship of N.C., a letter of December 28, 1918 from H.E.C. Bryant in which the author freely expresses his opinion as to Cameron Morrison and the role he thinks Sen. Furnifold M. Simmons and a number of other N. C. politicoes might play in the next gubernatorial election; letters attacking the political machine of Simmons, who supported Morrison in the 1920 campaign, and accusing Sen. Lee Overman of taking orders from Simmons; copy of an address delivered by Page on Mar. 11, 1920 to the students at the Univ. of N.C.; campaign literature; and a copy of Gardner for Governor Bulletin, April 1920.