Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Place Greensboro (N.C.) Remove constraint Place: Greensboro (N.C.)
Number of results to display per page
View results as:

Search Results

Collection
Printed materials including reports, event programs, newsletters, and brochures published by the Beloved Community Center between 2002-2013. Topics include local governance, the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the Greensboro Police Department. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Beloved Community Center is a community-based, grassroots organization dedicated to social activism, advocacy, and uplift in the Greensboro, NC area. The collection comprises printed materials, including reports, event programs, newsletters, and brochures published by the Beloved Community Center between 2002-2013. Topics include local governance, the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the Greensboro Police Department. Reports include: "A Decade of Building a Spirit of Beloved Community" and "Our Democratic Mission: Transitioning the Greensboro Police Department from Double Standards and Corruption to Accountability and Professionalism." Newsletters and brochures included are: "Towards a New Democratic Conversation: Connecting Mass Movements to Building Local People Power and Governance," "Celebrating 20 Years: A New Era for Greensboro and the Nation," "The Democracy Road: Toward a More Racially Just City, A Sustainable Economy, Good Jobs for All, and Relevant, Equitable Education." Also included is the event program for the "Swearing in and Seating of the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission." Reports include: "A Decade of Building a Spirit of Beloved Community" and "Our Democratic Mission: Transitioning the Greensboro Police Department from Double Standards and Corruption to Accountability and Professionalism." Newsletters and brochures included are: "Towards a New Democratic Conversation: Connecting Mass Movements to Building Local People Power and Governance," "Celebrating 20 Years: A New Era for Greensboro and the Nation," "The Democracy Road: Toward a More racially Just City, A Sustainable Economy, Good Jobs for All, and Relevant, Equitable Education." Also included is the event program for the "Swearing in and Seating of the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission."

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection
Fred Chappell is an author and a poet, and is a retired English professor from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Dabney Stuart is also an author and poet, and is a retired English professor at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. Accession (2009-0211) (150 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1984-2009) consists of Fred Chappell's letters to Dabney Stuart, covering a wide range of topics from personal stories and updates on families to his musings on literature and poetry in general. Chappell frequently offers feedback on Stuart's latest writings, as well as seeks input from Stuart on his own work. Occassional drafts are included for Stuart to read.

Accession (2009-0211) consists of Fred Chappell's letters to Dabney Stuart between 1984 and 2009. Most are handwritten by Chappell, and discuss both men's latest writings and activities, including family trips and academic conferences. Chappell frequently offers opinions on books that he has reviewed, as well as musings on literature in general. He often mentions Shenandoah, Stuart's literary journal from Washington and Lee University, and discusses his latest contributions. Chappell also provides feedback on Stuart's poetry, including works such as Light Years, "Gospel Singer," Narcissus Dreaming, Don't Look Back, Long Gone, Sweet Lucy Wine, and Plain Talk.