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Carlyle Marney papers, 1899-1979 58 Linear Feet — Approx. 45,000 Items

The papers of Carlyle Marney span the years 1899-1979, although the bulk of the collection begins in the late 1950s. Included are correspondence, drafts of writings and sermons, press releases, leaflets, pamphlets, bulletins, financial records, clippings, newsletters, calendars, reports, course materials, minutes, printed material, notes, pictures, tapes, and films. Reflected in the papers is information on rural poverty, the American Baptist Convention, the Baptist Church, especially in Texas and North Carolina, Christian writings, Abingdon Press, which published many of Marney's books, and racial prejudice. Concerning prejudice see in particular the Writings and Speeches Series: Marney (Structures of Prejudice) and the Correspondence Series (Church and Race Conference).

The principal focus of the collection is Marney's professional career as a Baptist clergyman, serving two lengthy pastorates at First Baptist Church in Austin, Texas (1948-1958), and at Myers Park Baptist Church in Charlotte, North Carolina (1958-1967), and as Founder-Director of Interpreters' House, an ecumenical center of study and work at Lake Junaluska, N.C. (1967-1978). He divided his duties to eventually develop a tripartite profession as a pastor, author, and speaker. He transcended his Southern roots to attain a national reputation as a speaker and theologian. The collection illuminates Marney as an independent and controversial figure within the Southern Baptist Church. One of the hallmarks of his ministry, which separated him from most Southern Baptists, was his ecumenical focus. According to his biographer, John J. Carey, "Marney sought to be a force for Baptist renewal and to broaden the ecclesiastical and theological bases of the Southern Baptists."¹

The Correspondence Series, Writings and Speeches Series, and Engagements Series form the major groups in the collection. The Correspondence Series, which comprises almost one-third of the bulk of the collection, consists chiefly of professional correspondence, but there is also a group of folders for Marney family members. Prominent correspondents include James T. Cleland, William Sloan Coffin, Pope A. Duncan, Findley Edge, Harry Golden, William J. Kilgore, Martin Luther King, Jr., Karl Menninger, Bill Moyers, Guy Ranson, and Elton Trueblood. Abingdon Press and the American Baptist Convention also have major files in this series. The Association of Southern Baptists for Scouting, Christian Century Foundation, and the Myers Park Baptist Church are other organizations represented in this series. The above-named topics also appear under appropriate topical headings in the Subject Files Series. There are also files in the Correspondence Series for the Church and Race Conference (Charlotte, N. C., 1965) and the God is Dead movement.

Both published and unpublished works appear in the Writings and Speeches Series. Marney was the author of twelve books and contributed articles to various theological journals; other single sermons appear in various anthologies. Most of his books were published by Abingdon Press, a Methodist publisher. There is also a copy of the book published in 1953, These Things Remain, as well as television programs, 1954, under the same title. Included in this series are the texts of unpublished books, such as City of Light/City of Wilderness,Great Encounter,Recovery of the Church, and Tragic Man/Tragic House.

In the files of writings of other persons are works of Karl Menninger and Guy Ranson, who also appear in Marney's correspondence. Other writers appearing in this section are Rufus Carrollton Harris, William Jackson Kilgore, Franklin Hamlin Littell, John David Maguire, Orval Hobart Mowrer, H. Richard Niebuhr, Schubert Miles Ogden, Clyde Penrose St. Amant, and John Egnar Skoglund.

The Engagements Series, 1958-1978, primarily reflects the latter portion of Marney's career, during his tenure at Myers Park Baptist Church and at Interpreters' House. Both this series and the Calendars Series testify to Marney's busy schedule of speaking appointments, especially during the Myers Park pastorate. In fact, the church hired a full-time administrator to aid in managing the daily activities of the church. Marney preached at major colleges, universities, and seminaries across the United States, including Harvard University, Yale University, and Duke University. He accepted a variety of speaking engagements including the Chautauqua Institute in New York; the Massanetta Center in Virginia; worship services; conferences and symposia; religious organizations, such as Temple Beth El Sisterhood; retreats; and the North Carolina Council of Churches. In addition, Marney spoke at military installations, the Southern Textile Association, and various secular organizations and clubs, such as the Chamber of Commerce, Sertoma Club, and YMCA.

Two major topics in the Subject Series are the Christian Century Foundation, of which Marney was a trustee, and the Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention. These two topics overlap with files in the Correspondence Series. Other files of interest include Abingdon Press, the Boy Scouts of America, the Committee on Religion in Appalachia, First Baptist Church (Austin), Myers Park Baptist Church, and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. There is also a mimeographed copy of a diary (prepared from tapes), 1954, Sept.-Nov., that Marney wrote on a trip to Korea and Japan, as part of a preaching mission for the Army and Air Force in the Far East.

The President's National Advisory Commission on Rural Poverty Series contains reports on aspects of rural poverty, such as economics, education, conservation and development of natural resources, health and medical care, government, housing, and farming.

The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Series includes notes on such topics as Christian missions, church history, theology, and Old and New Testament studies. An early volume, 1899-1902, contains notes for a class by W. O. Carver on Christian missions.

The Notes Series contains notes Marney made from the works of various theologians and other authors, such as F.S.C. Northrop, Hans Reichenbach, A. C. Reid, Paul Tillich, Harold H. Titus, Arnold J. Toynbee, and Alfred North Whitehead.

In the Audiovisual Series features sermons, lectures, and books in the following formats: cassette tapes, reel-to-reel tapes, and motion picture films. Of particular interest are the series of reel-to-reel tapes of Laymen's Hour recordings and the Massanetta Springs Recordings made by Marney. The Laymen's Hour was a radio broadcast; most of the recordings in this series are in 1965, with one in 1962. Massanetta Springs, Inc. is the Conference Center of the Synod of Virginia, Presbyterian Church, U. S., located near Harrisonburg, Va. These recordings, 1957-1974, were a series of annual lectures at Bible conferences at the center. Originals are closed to use, but listening copies are available for many of the recordings; otherwise staff need to arrange to have use copies made. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this collection.

1. John J. Carey, Carlyle Marney: A Pilgrim's Progress(Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 1980) , p. 36.

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Edward James Parrish papers, 1888-1926 and undated 9.2 Linear Feet — 31 boxes; 3 oversize folders; and 6 volumes — Approximately 1500 items

Tobacco manufacturer, resident of Durham, North Carolina, and Tokyo, Japan. The papers of Edward James Parrish primarily consist of business and personal papers, correspondence (chiefly 1900-1921), and photographic collections of Parrish and of his wife, Rosa Bryan Parrish. Items include a notebook on tobacco trade in China and Japan (1894-1900), letter books (1900-1904), and a scrapbook created by their only daughter Lily Parrish. Turn-of-the-century photograph albums relate to the Parrishes time in Japan (circa 1899-1905) and form a large series of their own. Two were assembled by Kichibei Murai of the Murai Brothers, a Tokyo cigarette manufacturing company of which Parrish was the first vice-president; they contain photographs of his residences and of banks, mines, oil fields, farms and tobacco factories in which he had an interest. Also included are seven fine souvenir albums with large hand-tinted albumen prints from noted Japanese studios, including that of Kusakabe Kimbei. There are also personal photograph and postcard albums of the Parrish's travels in Japan, Korea, and China, and Mrs. Parrish's reminiscences and impressions of her life in Japan. Loose family photographs and portraits dating from about 1890 to 1920 round out the collection.

The Edward James Parrish Papers include business and personal correspondence (chiefly 1900-1921) of Parrish and of his wife, Rosa Bryan Parrish. There are also various bills, a notebook on tobacco trade in China and Japan (1894-1900), letter books (1900-1904), photographic collections, several postcard albums, and a scrapbook created by Lily Parrish.

The papers also include Rosa Parrish's reminiscences and impressions of her life in Japan, as well as her writings on the status of women. There are also materials relating to Kichibei Murai's family and to Murai Brothers Company in Japan, close partners and friends of the Parrish family.

Photographic formats include glass plate negatives, loose prints, photo postcards, and over 20 albums. Two of the photograph albums date from the late 19th century and were owned by Kichibei Murai; they contain photographs of his residences and of banks, mines, oil fields, farms and tobacco factories in which he had an interest. Also included are black-and-white late 19th and early 20th century loose albumen and early gelatin silver prints of family members.

The photograph albums document the Parrish family's travels in Japan, China, and Niagara Falls, and include personal snapshots taken at these locations as well as in their home of Durham, N.C.; there are also many commercial souvenir photographs from Japan. The latter take the form of large finely handtinted albumen prints of Japanese scenery, landscapes, cultural sites and temples, clothing, entertainment, and transportation, housed in high-quality souvenir photograph albums; many of these feature highly decorated lacquer inlay covers, elaborate bindings. Most include captions. The studio of Kusakabe Kimbei, a noted photographer, created many of the prints and albums, and the work of other notable studios have also been identified.

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E. Ireland was a mature, unmarried Scottish woman at the time she authored a series of travel diaries from 1916 to 1920. Collection consists of five volumes (686 pages) of an illustrated travel diary kept by E. Ireland, a mature unmarried Scottish woman, between 20 August 1916 and 28 February 1920. The diaries document Ireland's travels throughout the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Japan, South Africa, and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). Typical entries describe local inhabitants and customs, conversations with fellow travelers, and sites visited. Many entries include sketches, pasted in postcards, photographs, postage stamps, menus, passenger lists, and other ephemera.

Collection consists of five volumes (686 pages) of an illustrated travel diary kept by E. Ireland, a mature unmarried Scottish woman, between 20 August 1916 and 28 February 1920. The diaries document Ireland's travels throughout the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Japan, South Africa, and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). Typical entries describe local inhabitants and customs, conversations with fellow travelers, and sites visited. Many entries include sketches, pasted in postcards, photographs, postage stamps, menus, passenger lists, and other ephemera.

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H. J. M. Shaw diary, 1902-1909 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 item

H. J. M. Shaw (b. 1876) was an English mining engineer and businessman who spent much of his time in China between 1902 and 1909. This collection consists of the diary of H. J. M. Shaw (b. 1876), an English mining engineer and businessman. The diary covers the period 1902-1909. The diary entries are in two distinct parts: June through August, 1902 during the start of a trip to China and April 1908 to March 1909 starting with Shaw travelling back to England with stops in Japan and Canada. Subsequent entries describe his vacation trips while back home including time spent in Ireland. The final entries describe his trip back to China and his daily activities once in Weihan, China.

This collection consists of the diary of H. J. M. Shaw (b. 1876), an English mining engineer and businessman. The diary covers the period 1902-1909 (predominantly the last 2 years) and its entries provide insight into the life of a turn-of-the-century business and vacation traveler. The diary entries are typically brief day-to-day accounts of location, weather, and people met. There are occasionally longer anecdotes regarding stories he's heard or that were related to him, meetings with Chineses government officials, and reactions to events in the news. There are also a couple drawings where Shaw attempts to show what is causing his dental problems. The diary can be seen as two distinct parts. In the first part, entries commence on June 21, 1902 during the start of a trip to China and describe events while travelling across the Atlantic to New York and then North America by train across Canada to Vancouver. Shaw then travels abord the Empress of China to Yokahama, Japan and then on to China. The second part starts with entries in April 1908 while Shaw is travelling in a houseboat along the Hsun Hsien River in China with friends. The diary then describes Shaw's trip back to England with stops in Japan and Canada along the way. When back in England, entries describe his subsequent vacation trips to visit friends in Worcestershire and taking a vacation in Ireland. Entries from October to November 1908 describe his trip back to China this time through France, Italy, Egypt, Singapore and Hong Kong. The remainder of the diary describes his daily activities in Weihan, China which typically included work in the morning, a visit to the library to meet his Chinese teacher or to a golf club in the afternoon, and dinner with his wife and friends in the evening. The diary also contains two draft letters. The first is a letter dated June 18, 1903 to the chief engineer of the Henan mining works describing how he was treated during his visit. The other is dated June 9, 1904 regarding the return of books from the mines to the Tientsin Municipal Library. There are also two newspaper clippings; one describing an explosion within the city of Canton, China and a letter to the editor response to an article in the China Times on Missionaries in China.

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Diaries from Jeanette Reid Healy's honeymoon, 1920-1922, kept as she and her husband Augustine Healy traveled around the world. Countries visited include Japan, China, Vietnam, Cambodia, Singapore, India, Pakistan, and Kenya. Includes 169 photographs of the couple's safari in Kenya, including images of William Judd, their guide.

Diaries of Jeanette Reid Healy, of Chicago, Ill., describing her two-and-a-half-year honeymoon with husband Augustine Healy touring Japan, Korea, China, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Cambodia, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore, India, Pakistan, and Kenya, principally describing the tourist sights and places they visited. Jeanette includes her impressions of the local landmarks, temples, museums, scenery, and people, often describing native dress, hairstyles, and appearances. The Healys were passionate hunters, particularly Augustine, so the diaries include detailed descriptions of their tiger and bear hunting in India, as well as their three-month African safari with extensive big game hunting of elephants, lions, rhinosaurus, and large deer. They were guided by William Judd; a clipping of his death notice is included. Included are 169 photographs from their safari, as well as the diaries' original book sleeve, bound in zebra skin.

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Set of 96 black-and-white glass lantern slides used in the United States for the teaching of history and geography. All of the slides except one were published by the Keystone View Company of Meadville, Pennsylvania. The 97th slide is a clear film transparency of a map of Germany following World War I, published by the Excelsior Illustration Company. Images include well-known United States historic sites; landmarks in colonial cities such as Williamsburg and Boston; views and cultural scenes from the Middle East, Japan, Hawaii, Korea, and the Philippines; a U.S. suffragists' parade in 1913; a set of Japanese and Western wedding scenes; and a few images of U.S. troops taken during the Mexican, Cuban and Philippine conflicts and in World War I. One slide shows the ruins of Belleau, France, circa 1918. Another features a memorial portrait of Secretary of State John Hay (d. 1905). The slides all measure 4 x 3.25 inches. They are accompanied by two booklets with detailed narrative entries for most of the slides. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Set of 96 black-and-white glass lantern slides used in the United States for the teaching of history and geography, probably in secondary schools and colleges. All of the slides except one were published by the Keystone View Company of Meadville, Pennsylvania. The 97th slide is a clear film transparency of a map of Germany following World War I, published by the Excelsior Illustration Company. Titles were transcribed from the originals as assigned by the Keystone Company.

Images include well-known United States historic sites; landmarks in colonial cities such as Williamsburg and Boston; views and cultural scenes from the Middle East, China, Japan, Hawaii, Korea, and the Philippines; a set of Japanese and Western wedding scenes; and a few images of U.S. troops taken during the Mexican, Cuban and Philippine conflicts and in World War I. One slide shows the ruins of Belleau, France, circa 1918. Other images include a U.S. suffragists' parade in 1913, a memorial portrait of John Hay, Secretary of State (died in 1905), the ship U.S.S. Maine, the "Rough Riders," and a portrait of the American Consul in Cuba. The slides all measure 4 x 3.25 inches. They are accompanied by two booklets with detailed narrative entries for most of the slides.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The Morris and Dorothy Margolin film collection dates from 1947 to 1982 and includes twenty-five 16mm and seven Super 8 motion picture films created by Morris Margolin, chiefly documenting Morris and Dorothy's international travels. The films include footage from Pakistan, Bulgaria, Ethiopia, and Kenya -- rare destinations for Western travelers in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. Highlights include an abundance of images of the Soviet Union and Israel, and images of Capetown documenting the apartheid years. All of the films are color, and a few include sound elements such as narration, music, or even sound effects. The collection also includes a handful of home movies that document family trips and events such as graduations and birthdays, and one film that appears to be a professionally produced documentary about the Soviet Union. The films are complemented by over 4,000 color slides of still images taken during their travels. The collection, arranged chronologically, also includes Digital Betacam preservation tapes, DVD masters and DVD use copies.

The Morris and Dorothy Margolin Film Collection includes 32 home movies that capture the Margolins' travels between 1947 and 1976. Destinations represented in the collection include Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Denmark, England, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Greece, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jamaica, Kenya, Majorca, Monaco, Morocco, Norway, Pakistan, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Scotland, South Africa, the Soviet Union, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, and Yugoslavia. All of the films are in color, and a few include sound.

Also included is a handful of home movies that document family trips and events such as graduations and birthdays, and one film that appears to be a professionally produced documentary about the Soviet Union acquired by the Margolins during their travels.

Particularly notable is the adventurous nature of many of the countries visited, such as the Soviet Union, Pakistan, Bulgaria, Ethiopia, and Kenya -- rare destinations for Western travelers in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. The films are also noteworthy because Morris often trained his camera on his surroundings, recording everyday life as well as architectural and geographical features of the countries he visited. His wife Dorothy also makes frequent appearances in the films.

The films are complemented by over 4,000 color slides taken in most of these same countries from 1959 to 1982. Of particular interest are images from the former Soviet Union and Israel, both from the mid-1960s, images of South Africa during apartheid, as well as early images of France, Italy, and Thailand.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Postcard collection, 1893-2010s 87 Linear Feet — 65,750 Items

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Collection contains postcards acquired at various times by the Rubenstein Library at Duke. Collection is organized into three main categories--International, United States, and Miscellaneous. The International postcards are arranged by country and include cards from France, Italy, Canada, England, Germany, Japan, Spain, and Russia. The collection includes a set of early 20th century postcards from Thessaloniki (also known as Salonica and Selanik), Greece. The United States postcards cover many states, with large numbers from North Carolina and Virginia. The Miscellaneous category contains postcards with different subjects, including modes of transportation, food, tourism, agriculture, wars and battles, heads of state, flowers and plants, advertising, love and friendship, Confederate memorials, poetry, and animals. There are cards intended to be humorous, as well as cards depicting racist stereotypes and caricatures of African American and Native American people. Also included is a series of postcards with images relating to European artists.

Collection contains postcards acquired at various times by the Rubenstein Library at Duke. Collection is organized into three main categories--International, United States, and Miscellaneous. The International postcards are arranged by country and include cards from France, Italy, Canada, England, Germany, Japan, Spain, and Russia. The collection includes a set of early 20th century postcards from Thessaloniki (also known as Salonica and Selanik), Greece. The United States postcards cover many states, with large numbers from North Carolina and Virginia. The Miscellaneous category contains postcards with different subjects, including modes of transportation, food, tourism, agriculture, wars and battles, heads of state, flowers and plants, advertising, love and friendship, Confederate memorials, poetry, and animals. There are cards intended to be humorous, as well as cards depicting racist stereotypes and caricatures of African American and Native American people. Also included is a series of postcards with images relating to European artists.

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William E. Tolbert was a Union soldier and businessman of Chambersburg, Pa. Collection includes correspondence and business, personal, and legal papers of Tolbert and several members of the Tolbert (Talbot) and Huber families of Chambersburg, Pa., containing information about family affairs, Republican Party affairs in Chambersburg, and William E. Tolbert's activities with the Chief Engineer's Office of the U.S. Military Railroad in the Division of the Mississippi. There are a number of letters (1883-1922) to Emma Tolbert from her friend Elizabeth Russell, who was a Methodist missionary in Nagasaki, Japan.

Collection includes correspondence and business, personal, and legal papers of Tolbert and several members of the Tolbert (Talbot) and Huber families of Chambersburg, Pa., containing information about family affairs, Republican Party affairs in Chambersburg, and William E. Tolbert's activities with the Chief Engineer's Office of the U.S. Military Railroad in the Division of the Mississippi. There are a number of letters (1883-1922) to Emma Tolbert from her friend Elizabeth Russell, who was a Methodist missionary in Nagasaki, Japan.