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Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers. The photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or from Korea. The images depict soldiers at work and enjoying recreational time. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Collection includes an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs carefully arranged and mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers inlaid with mother-of-pearl. Photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or Korea, as the latter was strongly influenced by Japanese culture until the end of World War II.

The images depict soldiers in and out of uniform and often engaged in recreational pursuits. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Included with the album is an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by an amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. Nightingale from 1920 to 1921, while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's photographs are of value not only for the image content, which includes street scenes, vendors, modes of transportation, shrines, temples, pagodas, monasteries, towers, and landscapes, but also for his lengthy contextual commentary written on the back of each card. The majority of the images were taken in Hangzhou (referred to as Hangchow), Suzhou (Soochow), Mount Putuo island (Pu-tu), and Shanghai, China, but there are also a few images from other cities (Ningbo, Chang'an, and Harinen?), and a set of 11 images were taken in Japan. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. (F.B.) Nightingale from 1920 to 1921 while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's collection is of value not only for the image content, which includes many street scenes with individuals in addition to well-known sites and landscapes, but also for his lengthy captions on the back of each card, commenting on food customs, architecture, folklore, commerce, and religious beliefs and practices, as seen from a Westerner's perspective.

The majority of the images were taken in Suzhou (referred to in captions as Soochow, 55 images), Hangzhou (Hangchow, 44), Mount Putuo Island (Pu-tu, 14), and Shanghai, China (13), but there are also a few photographs from other cities (Chang'an, Ningbo, Harinen?), and a set of 11 images taken in Japan. There is also one photograph of overgrown land on Nightingale's Pasadena, California property called "Palawoo." Several images feature Nightingale, and one shows the porter carrying his camera equipment. The majority of the images are crisp with little fading. A few are stamped with small identification numbers.

Subjects include numerous temples, pagodas, monasteries, monuments, tombs, and other historic sites, some of which no longer exist. Nightingale was able to capture some images of temple interiors, and he often noted which religious sites allowed entry to women. There are many photos of street life, river traffic, modes of transportation, and Chinese vendors and pedestrians going about their daily business.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Set of 95 photographic color images in slide format, taken by Jeff Kosokoff, a librarian at Duke University, Durham, N.C., while traveling in Japan, mainland China, and Taiwan from January to April 1983. The images are arranged by geographic location, in alphabetical order: Akira, Japan; Hong Kong; Hohhot (or Huhhot), the capital of the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region in North China; the Inner Mongolia grasslands; and Taipei, Taiwan. Subjects includes the rural landscapes and cityscapes of each area and its citizens, including street scenes and street art, markets, advertising and other signs, vending machines, and modes of transportation. Photographs taken in Inner Mongolia include dwellings (yurts), families and individuals in native dress, domestic Bactrian camels, and some scenes from the city of Hohhot. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists of a set of 95 photographic color images in slide format, taken by Jeff Kosokoff, a librarian at Duke University, Durham, N.C., while traveling in Japan, mainland China, and Taiwan from January to April 1983. The images are arranged by geographic location, in alphabetical order: Akira, Japan; Hong Kong; Hohhot (or Huhhot), the capital of the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region in North China; the Inner Mongolia grasslands; and Taipei, Taiwan. Subjects includes rural landscapes and cityscapes of each area and its citizens, including street scenes and street art, markets, advertising and other signs, vending machines, and modes of transportation. There are images of an acrobatics performance and some night cityscapes. Images taken in Inner Mongolia include dwellings (yurts), families and individuals in native dress, domestic Bactrian camels, and some scenes from the city of Hohhot.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The Lucy Monroe Calhoun family photographs and papers contains loose photographs, a photograph album, Lucy Monroe Calhoun's writings and papers, along with Monroe family papers. The photographs include 740 loose black-and-white photographs, generally developing-out paper or gelatin sliver prints, as well as 7 negatives, and one slide, all featuring images of Lucy's residences, locations in a and around Peking (Beijing), and locations elsewhere in China, Cambodia, Japan, and the Philippines between 1910 and 1932. A subset of 15 photographs contains images captured during the Peking riots of 1912. The photograph album (60 pages) contains 94 albumen prints featuring images taken during the Calhoun party's travel between China and the United States in 1911, via Siberia. The Lucy Monroe Calhoun papers series features primarily Calhoun's writings, including her 276-page memoir of her life in China (1910-1936), five typescript articles on China, as well as her letters to family members, commercial postcards, and printed material. The Monroe family papers include mainly writing by family members, from letters to autobiographical and biographical pieces, along with some photographs, postcards, and a few newspaper clippings. There are also extensive letters written by Polly Root Collier and Henry Stanton Monroe, Lucy Monroe Calhoun's niece and nephew, both of whom wrote letters to family members during their stays in China. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

The Lucy Monroe Calhoun family photographs and papers contains loose photographs, a photograph album, Lucy Monroe Calhoun's writings and papers, along with Monroe family papers. The photographs include 740 loose black-and-white photographs, generally developing-out paper or gelatin sliver prints, as well as 7 negatives, and one slide, all featuring images of Lucy's residences, locations in a and around Peking (Beijing), and locations elsewhere in China, Cambodia, Japan, and the Philippines between 1910 and 1932. A subset of 15 photographs contains images captured during the Peking riots of 1912. The photograph album (60 pages) contains 94 albumen prints featuring images taken during the Calhoun party's travel between China and the United States in 1911, via Siberia. The Lucy Monroe Calhoun papers series features primarily Calhoun's writings, including her 276-page memoir of her life in China (1910-1936), five typescript articles on China, as well as her letters to family members, commercial postcards, and printed material. The Monroe family papers include mainly writing by family members, from letters to autobiographical and biographical pieces, along with some photographs, postcards, and a few newspaper clippings. There are also extensive letters written by Polly Root Collier and Henry Stanton Monroe, Lucy Monroe Calhoun's niece and nephew, both of whom wrote letters to family members during their stays in China. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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William Hillman Shockley photographs, 1896-1922 and undated, bulk 1897-1909 9.0 Linear Feet — 20 boxes; approximately 3224 items

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white photographs taken by W.H. (William Hillman) Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer between the years 1896 to 1909. Locations include China (including Manchuria); Korea; India; Japan; Australia; and Russia (including Siberia); London; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco; as well as several other south Asian locations. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Formats include more than 2000 small vintage prints, over 400 modern prints, and over 400 nitrate film and glass plate negatives. Many of the photographs bear original captions. There are also some Shockley family photographs, correspondence (1905-1922), a notebook from India, and a few items of memorabilia. Arranged in series by geographical location and format. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white images taken by W.H. Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer. Locations include China (including Manchuria), Korea, India, Japan, Australia, and Russia (including Siberia), between the years of 1897 and 1909. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Other formats in the collection include negatives, modern photographic prints, correspondence, and a few artifacts and memorabilia. Shockley also documented his experiences in Russia, China, and other places in articles and presentations for the mining industry; some are available online (retrieved April 2016).

The bulk of the collection is made up of 2,227 vintage black-and-white contact prints measuring from 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches to 4x6 inches, many of which bear original captions in Shockley's hand. They are arranged in series by geographical location and date of travel. Accompanying these small prints is a small set of larger card-mounted photographs of Shockley family members, including Shockley's wife, May Bradford Shockley, and their young son William B. Shockley. There are also over 400 original nitrate film and glass plate negatives, some of which contain images not found elsewhere in the collection.

Several hundred modern 8x10 inch prints were made by a photo collector from Shockley's original negatives, chiefly of Russia and Siberia; some of these are unique images not found among the small original prints, including images of an upper-class family on an unidentified estate in England.

Non-photographic materials consist of Shockley's field notebook from India containing an index of photographs he took there; mica mineral samples from India; original envelopes and glass plate boxes; and a bound letterbook containing approximately 100 pieces of business correspondence and a few pieces of personal correspondence, dating from 1905 to 1922.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.