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Abraham Hanson papers, 1840-1866 and undated 0.2 Linear Feet — 57 items

Abraham Hanson was an English-born American pastor and diplomat. Collection comprises 37 letters, dated 1850-1866, Abraham Hanson wrote to his wife, Lydia, and one he wrote to his father from Monrovia, Liberia, among other places. Topics include abolition, diplomatic duties, commercial affairs, emigration, shipboard travel, the condition of Liberians and his aspirations for them, health concerns, and personal matters. There are also 15 incoming letters written to Hanson and his wife, dated 1846-1866, reporting on Hanson's welfare and conditions in Liberia and Africa, along with personal travel and religious matters. Includes several condolences written to Lydia following Hanson's dearth. In addition, there is funeral sermon Hanson preached on 1848 December 10 in Wisconsin, a copy of the New York City Colonization Society's circular dated 1840 May 3, and a copy of an 1852 Liberian court decision regarding payment of tuition and provision of clothing for Robert Savage. There is also a sermon dated 1863 Dec 10, entitled "Zion's Compliance and God's Answer, Isaiah 49-16-15." Two of the letters in the collection are incomplete. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises 37 letters, dated 1850-1866, Abraham Hanson wrote to his wife, Lydia, and one he wrote to his father from Monrovia, Liberia, among other places. Topics include abolition, diplomatic duties, commercial affairs, emigration, shipboard travel, the condition of Liberians and his aspirations for them, health concerns, and personal matters. There are also 15 incoming letters written to Hanson and his wife, dated 1846-1866, reporting on Hanson's welfare and conditions in Liberia and Africa, along with personal travel and religious matters. Includes several condolences written to Lydia following Hanson's dearth. In addition, there is funeral sermon Hanson preached on 1848 December 10 in Wisconsin, a copy of the New York City Colonization Society's circular dated 1840 May 3, and a copy of an 1852 Liberian court decision regarding payment of tuition and provision of clothing for Robert Savage. There is also a sermon dated 1863 Dec 10, entitled "Zion's Compliance and God's Answer, Isaiah 49-16-15." Two of the letters in the collection are incomplete. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Ezekiel Skinner papers, 1834-1836 1 Linear Foot — 40 Items

Ezekiel Skinner (1777-1855) was a missionary and physician who worked in Monrovia, Liberia for the American Colonization Society during the 1830s. Although almost 60 years old, Skinner believed it was his duty to continue the work of his son, Benjamin Rush Skinner, who had died in Liberia a few years before. He returned to the United States in 1837. This collection consists of 15 letters and other related documents (with typed transcripts) written by Dr. Ezekiel Skinner during his time working for the American Colonization Society in Liberia. Skinner travelled to Africa twice beginning in 1834 and finally returning to the United States in 1837. These letters cover both trips and provide information about the day-to-day challenges faced by the emigrants from the United States. The majority of the letters are addressed to his family and written in the style of a journal, but there are also retained copies of Skinner's official correspondence as an officer of the Society. The contents of the letters touch upon various topics such as living conditions, missionary work, interaction with native Africans, and medical care of the emigrants.

This collection consists of 15 letters and other related documents (with typed transcripts) written by Dr. Ezekiel Skinner during his time working for the American Colonization Society in Liberia. Skinner travelled to Africa twice beginning in 1834 and finally returning to the United States in 1837. These letters cover both trips and provide information about the day-to-day challenges faced by the emigrants from the United States. The majority of the letters are addressed to his family and written in the style of a journal, but there are also retained copies of Skinner's official correspondence as an officer of the Society. The contents of the letters touch upon various topics such as living conditions, missionary work, interaction with native Africans, and medical care of the emigrants.