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Edmund John Catrow was a marine who served in the following units during World War II. Collection primarily comprises a photograph album, entitled "The Occupation of Japan: Nagasaki, Isahaya, Kumamoto, Sasebo," Catrow maintained during his service in the marines from 1945-1946. There are 277 black-and-white photographs, mostly 3 1/4 x 4 1/2 inches, plus five Japanese newspapers and several other clippings. Many of the photographs have handwritten captions in white ink.

Collection primarily comprises a photograph album, entitled "The Occupation of Japan: Nagasaki, Isahaya, Kumamoto, Sasebo," Edmund J. Catrow maintained during his service in the marines from 1945-1946. There are 277 black-and-white photographs, mostly 3 1/4 x 4 1/2 inches, plus five Japanese newspapers and several other clippings. Many of the photographs have handwritten captions in white ink. The photograph album begins with the embarkation of the 2nd Marine Division at Garapan Harbor in Saipan and continues with images of the convoy en route. Arriving in Nagasaki, Catrow found abandoned and destroyed Japanese ships and the skeletal remains of the Mitsubishi factory in the harbor. The photos from Nagasaki itself show the destruction of the atomic bomb, and document street scenes and some of the few remaining buildings, such as the train station. There are also several pictures of the Isahaya airfield, including a number of Japanese airplanes.

After Nagasaki, Catrow moved to Kumamoto, where he was assigned to a Military Police company. His photos include pictures of Japanese soldiers still in uniform, numerous images of post-war life in Japan and military life at the barracks and in town for the American occupation forces, and well as a number shots of military duties and activities. During this time, Catrow apparently provided photos for the local newspaper, the Kumamoto Nichinichi Shimsun; five newspapers containing his work are tipped into the rear of this album, which also contains a picture of Catrow in front of the newspaper office. A translation of one of the articles states that, "Catro-San... keeps a sharp eye on the city as he patrols on his jeep, but he casts another 'cultural eye' on what happens around him." After a weekend leave at Mt. Aso, which is documented in twelve photographs, Catrow left Kumamoto for Sasebo, where he was due to embark for the United States. The images there concentrate on the harbor and several Japanese and American vessels. The rest of the album is devoted to the voyage home to San Diego, including an organized wrestling match and the celebration of Christmas aboard the ship. Catrow's arrival in California is well documented, and the final images of the album are at Camp Pendleton, where he stayed while awaiting his discharge. Laid-in at the back of the album were newspaper clippings and one magazine clipping, dating between 1967 and 1972 and undated, on topics related to Saipan, all presumably added by Catrow. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Frank Espada photographs and papers, 1946-2010, bulk 1964-2000 56.2 Linear Feet — 76 boxes; 3 oversize folders — approximately 14,500 items

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Frank Espada was a political activist and documentary photographer of Puerto Rican extraction based in New York and California. His photographic archives comprise thousands of black-and-white photographs and negatives as well as supporting papers and recordings, chiefly dating from the mid-1960s through 2000. The materials relate to Espada's lifelong work documenting the Puerto Rican diaspora, civil and economic rights movements, indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco. The Puerto Rican Diaspora series includes over 150 oral history recordings. The Civil Rights series documents voter registration drives and school desegregation rallies in New York City, 1964-1970, as well as discriminatory housing and anti-poverty movements, primarily in California. The professional papers provide supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher, and include files related to research and writings, exhibits, teaching, and publicity. The earliest dated item is a 1946 essay by Espada, "What democracy means to me." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Frank Espada's photographic archives comprise thousands of photographic prints, contact sheets, and negatives, as well as professional papers, spanning the length of Frank Espada's career as a photographer and community activist from the mid-1950s through 2010. The materials document Espada's Puerto Rican diaspora around the world; indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, primarily in Guam, Tinian, and Saipan; drug abuse prevention programs and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco; and civil rights, education, and housing rights movements, primarily in New York City and San Francisco. Espada was not only an observant photographer, but was also deeply involved in all of his projects as an activist, social worker, and humanitarian.

A large series of professional papers provides supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher. The earliest dated item, an essay Espada wrote in 1946, "What democracy means to me," is found in this series, which also contains research files on documentary and research topics; preparation for his many photography projects and related exhibits; a few videocassettes; teaching syllabi and notes from his photography courses at U.C. Berkeley; awards and memorabilia; and publicity.

The largest body of materials, which numbers over 12,000 items and includes photographs as well as manuscripts and over 100 recorded oral interviews, derives from Espada's work with Puerto Rican communities in the U.S. and in Puerto Rico.

Another significant group of materials derives from Espada's activism on behalf of voter registration and school desegregation in New York City from 1962-1970, and later in California in support of anti-poverty, HIV/AIDS and drug abuse prevention and outreach, and housing rights.

Each of the photographic project series includes finished prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 24x30 inches; contact sheets and work prints; and negatives, which are housed in a separate series and are closed to use.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.