Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Place New York (N.Y.) -- Photographs Remove constraint Place: New York (N.Y.) -- Photographs

Search Results

collection icon

André Kertész photographs, 1919-1984 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 31 photographic prints — 8x10 and 11x14 inches

Collection of 31 black-and-white photographs by André Kertész provides a sampling of his compositional styles and topical interests. Taken from 1919 through 1984, the images chiefly feature street scenes from Paris (1920-1984), and several each from Budapest and New York City. There are also two female nude studies from his 1930s series "Distortions," two still lifes, and several landscapes. The majority of the gelatin silver prints are sized 8x10 inches, with four measuring 11x14 inches. On the backs are various markings, including dates and identifying marks by Kertész and others, with many bearing a Kertész estate stamp. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 31 black-and-white prints by noted photographer André Kertész provides a portfolio representing the full range of his compositional styles and topical interests. Taken from 1919 through the 1980s, the end years of his career, the images chiefly feature street scenes from Paris in the 1920s and 1930s and 1980s, with a few street scenes from Budapest (1919 and 1920), and a handful from New York City from his later years in that city, with one from 1939. There are two photographs from the 1930s series "Distortions," featuring female nudes with distortion effects. Several images include cats and dogs. There are a handful of landscapes with no known location, and two still lifes.

The majority of the prints are sized 8x10 inches, with four measuring 11x14 inches. They bear various markings on the backs, including crop marks, dates, and identifying marks by Kertész and others. All but five are marked with the Kertész estate stamp; several bear the photographer's stamp.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

Bruce Davidson photographs, 1955-2008 6 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 229 photographic prints

Bruce Davidson (b. 1933) is an American-born photographer, and a member of the Magnum Photo cooperative agency. Collection consists of 229 photographic prints, mostly black-and-white, with color work present in several series. Subjects range widely, with a focus on human interactions, minority and disenfranchised communities, urban street photography, and landscapes influenced by human activity. Locations include Chicago; Paris; England, Wales, and Scotland; Sicily and Venice; Los Angeles and the California Pacific Coast Highway; and New York City, including East Harlem, Central Park, the subway, and other locations. Also included is a large series of portraits chiefly of celebrities, and images deriving from commercial assignments. Several portraits of African Americans from Mississippi, South Carolina, and New York City were taken in 1962 while Davidson was documenting civil rights actions. Other short series feature nude female studies, French fashion shows, and scenes from the film production of Zabriskie Point by Antonioni. Sizes range from approximately 6x9 to 20x24 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The images in this collection were taken by photographer Bruce Davidson over the course of his career, from 1955 to 2008. Genres include street photography, interiors, landscapes, and portraits, all offering a complex view into interactions between people, and between humans and natural and built environments. Most were shot in black-and-white with a large-format camera, though there are also chromogenic and dye transfer color prints in several series. Most of the series in the collection house a small selection of prints from each project; the largest series, Portraits, contains almost 50 prints.

Some of Davidson's earliest photographs were shot in Montmartre, Paris in the 1950s, where he documented the solitary life of the widow of an Impressionist painter. He later returned to Paris in 1962, 1999, and 2005. He traveled the streets of New York City in the 1960s, exploring life in the Lower East Side, East Harlem, and Central Park, and continued this work from the 1970s into the 2000s. There are several series exploring Los Angeles, dating from the 1960s to the 2000s, as well as a series of images taken in Chicago during a visit in 1989. A few images are from Venice and Sicily.

Also present is a large series featuring portraits of U.S. actors, authors, politicians, artists, a conductor, and a rock musician. This series contains the earliest work in the collection, several portraits taken in 1955 of an aging couple in Arizona. A separate series, Time of Change, contains three portraits of African American rural and urban citizens in Mississippi, South Carolina, and New York City, taken in 1962 while Davidson documented the civil rights and suffrage movements in those locations.

Other series in this collection feature images of people, animals, and landscapes in England, Scotland, and coal mining communities in Wales; portraits of passengers on the New York subways; and photographs taken at fashion shoots and at filming locations for Zabriskie Point. Also included is a series of images from commercial assignments and commissions (1983-1997).

Image titles were taken from the prints or from the Magnum Photos website; a few other titles and captions derive from donor notes. Prints with no known titles are noted as such. Significant markings on the prints are also noted, as are legacy identifiers, which include various alphanumberic codes assigned by Davidson, the Magnum cooperative, and a private collector.

The prints are unmounted and were created with traditional processes, chiefly silver gelatin (black-and-white) on paper, with large-format color work present in the Chicago and Subway series, and a few smaller color prints scattered in the Commercial and California series. Print sheet dimensions are given to the nearest 1/8 inch and include variations on 8x10, 8 1/2 x 11, 11x14, 16x20, and 20x24 sizes.

Many of the images in this collection were published in photobooks and in journalistic publications, and have been exhibited widely.

collection icon

Frank Espada photographs and papers, 1946-2010, bulk 1964-2000 56.2 Linear Feet — 76 boxes; 3 oversize folders — approximately 14,500 items

online icon
Frank Espada was a political activist and documentary photographer of Puerto Rican extraction based in New York and California. His photographic archives comprise thousands of black-and-white photographs and negatives as well as supporting papers and recordings, chiefly dating from the mid-1960s through 2000. The materials relate to Espada's lifelong work documenting the Puerto Rican diaspora, civil and economic rights movements, indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco. The Puerto Rican Diaspora series includes over 150 oral history recordings. The Civil Rights series documents voter registration drives and school desegregation rallies in New York City, 1964-1970, as well as discriminatory housing and anti-poverty movements, primarily in California. The professional papers provide supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher, and include files related to research and writings, exhibits, teaching, and publicity. The earliest dated item is a 1946 essay by Espada, "What democracy means to me." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Frank Espada's photographic archives comprise thousands of photographic prints, contact sheets, and negatives, as well as professional papers, spanning the length of Frank Espada's career as a photographer and community activist from the mid-1950s through 2010. The materials document Espada's Puerto Rican diaspora around the world; indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, primarily in Guam, Tinian, and Saipan; drug abuse prevention programs and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco; and civil rights, education, and housing rights movements, primarily in New York City and San Francisco. Espada was not only an observant photographer, but was also deeply involved in all of his projects as an activist, social worker, and humanitarian.

A large series of professional papers provides supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher. The earliest dated item, an essay Espada wrote in 1946, "What democracy means to me," is found in this series, which also contains research files on documentary and research topics; preparation for his many photography projects and related exhibits; a few videocassettes; teaching syllabi and notes from his photography courses at U.C. Berkeley; awards and memorabilia; and publicity.

The largest body of materials, which numbers over 12,000 items and includes photographs as well as manuscripts and over 100 recorded oral interviews, derives from Espada's work with Puerto Rican communities in the U.S. and in Puerto Rico.

Another significant group of materials derives from Espada's activism on behalf of voter registration and school desegregation in New York City from 1962-1970, and later in California in support of anti-poverty, HIV/AIDS and drug abuse prevention and outreach, and housing rights.

Each of the photographic project series includes finished prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 24x30 inches; contact sheets and work prints; and negatives, which are housed in a separate series and are closed to use.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

Gary Davis collection of Leon Levinstein photographs, 1950s-1970s 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 38 prints

Collection consists of 38 black-and-white photographs taken by Leon Levinstein from the 1950s to the 1970s. The images, usually taken at close range and at unusual angles, portray children, women, and men of all races and backgrounds - many of them marginalized - on New York City streets and on the beach. Locations include Harlem, Manhattan, the Lower East Side, and Coney Island. There are also photographs of people in Haiti. and a few from India and Mexico. Most of the unmounted gelatin silver prints measure approximately 11x14 inches, with several larger prints. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 38 black-and-white photographs taken by Leon Levinstein from the 1950s to the 1970s. The images, usually taken at close range and at unusual angles, portray children, women, and men of all races and backgrounds - many of them marginalized - on New York City streets and on the beach. Locations include Harlem, Manhattan, the Lower East Side, and Coney Island. There are also photographs of people in Haiti. and a few from India and Mexico. Only one scene, a piano in a room, has no people in it.

Levinstein deliberately left his images untitled and undated, thus most prints in this inventory are accompanied by content descriptions created by a collector or dealer, or, in a few cases, by library staff. Almost all the prints bear a photographer's stamp on the back and a few are signed by Levinstein. Most of the prints measure approximately 11x14 inches, with a few larger prints; in the dimensions given, height precedes width.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

Lynn Saville photographs, 1972-2015 and undated 21.5 Linear Feet — 20 boxes — 295 items

The collection dates from 1972 to 2015 and consists of over 200 large color and black-and-white photographic prints of nighttime scenes selected from the work of photographer Lynn Saville in urban centers such as Paris, Rome, Venice, New York City, Durham, North Carolina, Los Angeles, Vermont, and other locations. The collection also includes 30 portraits of artists, feminists, writers, family members, and other individuals, as well as self-portraits. Supplemental materials such as book reviews and book maquettes round out the collection. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists of selections of work from photographer Lynn Saville's portraiture and night photography from urban America, dating from 1972-2015. Formats include traditional darkroom gelatin silver prints, color prints, and a small number of digital prints. Sizes range from 11x14 to 20x24 inches.

The Portraits series includes 30 images of poets, photographers, family members, friends, and prominent women such as Barbara Jordan, Adrienne Rich and Bella Abzug. The collection's primary focus, however, is Saville's more recent work, housed in the Nocturnal Photography and Dark City series, containing 205 photographs of night scenes in the United States and Europe, particularly New York City (with a focus on Brooklyn) and Paris. Other locations include Los Angeles, North Carolina, Vermont, Paris, Rome, and Venice.

Selected images are also available online as part of a Duke University Libraries digital exhibit.

There is also a Supplemental Materials series which includes printed matter such as articles and book reviews, and a documentary film directed by Anna Borden about Saville's career and photography (2003).

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

Max Belcher photographs, 1969-1998 10 Linear Feet — 48 boxes — 1425 Items

The photographs and printed materials in this collection date from 1969 to 1998, and document the work of Max Belcher, American-born photographer. The collection is organized into two series: Printed Materials and Photography. The Printed Materials Series consists of publicity, exhibit literature, and other materials related to Belcher's work as a photographer. The much larger Photography Series includes 1,027 contact sheets (860 black-and-white, 167 color), 381 photographs (239 black-and-white, 142 color), and five color fine prints spanning nearly three decades of Belcher's professional work as a photographer. This series is divided into eleven project-based subseries, which have been arranged chronologically by the start date of each project. Within each subseries, contact sheets precede photographs,and black-and-white work precedes color. Individual items in the photography series bear specific technical and identifying information, usually marked by Belcher on the backs of contact sheets and photographs. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

collection icon

Mel Rosenthal photographs, 1975-2011 3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes — Approximately 92 items

Collection consists of 80 black-and-white photographs taken by native New Yorker Mel Rosenthal, stemming from two documentary projects. The first documents the destruction by arson of an entire South Bronx neighborhood in New York City in the 1970s, with images of burned-out buildings and inhabitants who were forced to abandon their homes. The second project depicts Arab Americans, including men, women and children of Syrian, Egyptian, Moroccan, Algerian, Jordanian and Palestinian descent, living in New York State during the last decade of the 20th century and the early 2000s. Scenes include images of children, professionals, neighborhood life, and the religious lives of Christians, Muslims, Greek Orthodox, Maronites, Jews and Coptics. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 and 16x20 inches. Also included are some publicity items for exhibits and a workshop on documentary photography, and an audiocassette recording of Rosenthal speaking at an exhibit opening in 2004. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 80 black-and-white photographs taken by New York City native Mel Rosenthal, stemming from two documentary projects. The first documents the destruction by arson of an entire South Bronx neighborhood in New York City in the 1970s, with images of burned-out buildings and inhabitants who were forced to abandon their homes. The neighborhood is the same one where Rosenthal grew up, and the series features a portrait of Mel Rosenthal in his old bedroom.

The second project examines the daily lives of Arab Americans, including men, women and children of Syrian, Egyptian, Moroccan, Algerian, Jordanian and Palestinian descent, in New York State in the early 2000s. Scenes include images of children, professionals, neighborhood life, and the religious lives of Christians, Muslims, Greek Orthodox, Maronites, Jews and Coptics. It was exhibited shortly after the 2001 terrorist attacks.

Selected images in the Rosenthal collection were exhibited at Duke University and these available online. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 and 16x20 inches. Exhibit prints in their mats measure 16x20 and 20x24 inches.

Also included are some publicity items for exhibits and workshops on documentary photography, a music CD with photography by Rosenthal, and an audiocassette recording of Rosenthal speaking at an exhibit opening in 2004.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

R.C. Maxwell Company records, 1891-2001 and undated 135 Linear Feet — 118,350 Items

online icon
R.C. Maxwell Company of Trenton, N.J., was one of the earliest enduring outdoor advertising companies, founded in 1894 by Robert Chester Maxwell (1873-1955) and continued to operate primarily in the New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania area until the company was sold in 2000. The R.C. Maxwell Company Records span the years 1891-2001 and include photographs and negatives, videocassettes, ledgers and account books, scrapbooks, correspondence and legal papers relating to the company's operations in outdoor advertising. Photographs and negatives in several formats (film, glass negatives, polaroid prints) document billboard designs for a variety of advertisers as well as depicting billboard and electric sign structures and their location relative to the surrounding environment. Urban locations include Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J., Boardwalk, where a number of photographs also document the Miss America beauty pageant parade and other parades in which the R.C. Maxwell Company participated. A few photographs document billboard construction and erection; there are also photographs of the Maxwell family and of Maxwell company staff and employees. Scrapbooks contain images of billboards and wall paintings produced by the Maxwell company as well as by David L. Clark, a High Point, N.C. artist and sign painter who was R.C. Maxwell's guardian. Other scrapbooks document primarily Coca-Cola signs of the early 20th century, as well as World War I support efforts including the U.S. Food Administration (under the direction of Herbert Hoover), the U.S. Fuel Administration, and Liberty Bond campaigns. Companies represented in the collection include the Boardwalk Advertising Signs Co., C&B Electric Signs Co., Trenton Advertising Co., and Trenton Poster Advertising Co. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The R.C. Maxwell Company Records span the years 1891-2001 and include photographs and negatives, videocassettes, ledgers and account books, scrapbooks, correspondence and legal papers relating to the company's operations in outdoor advertising. Photographs and negatives in several formats (film, glass negatives, polaroid prints) document billboard designs for a variety of advertisers as well as depicting billboard and electric sign structures and their location relative to the surrounding environment. Urban locations include Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J., Boardwalk, where a number of photographs also document the Miss America beauty pageant parade and other parades in which the R.C. Maxwell Company participated. A few photographs document billboard construction and erection; there are also photographs of the Maxwell family and of Maxwell company staff and employees. Scrapbooks contain images of billboards and wall paintings produced by the Maxwell company as well as by David L. Clark, a High Point, N.C. artist and sign painter who was R.C. Maxwell's guardian. Other scrapbooks document primarily Coca-Cola signs of the early 20th century, as well as World War I support efforts including the U.S. Food Administration (under the direction of Herbert Hoover), the U.S. Fuel Administration, and Liberty Bond campaigns. Companies represented in the collection include the Boardwalk Advertising Signs Co., C&B Electric Signs Co., Trenton Advertising Co., and Trenton Poster Advertising Co.

Approximately 15,000 photographs, dating up to around 1952, have been described in the searchable ROAD Database (Resource of Outdoor Advertising Descriptions). The numbered and indexed black-and-white photographs and negatives (along with a limited number of glass negatives) include images of billboard and electric spectacular executions (illuminated billboards); road shots showing the approach views to billboard structures; images of Maxwell advertising structures; and images of urban and rural billboard displays in various states, primarily Pennsylvania and New Jersey, including a number of images of Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J. boardwalk. Because the majority of photographs show the billboards in their surroundings, the images provide a snapshot of the people and buildings near the billboard.

collection icon

Ronald Reis photographs, 1954-2014 20.5 Linear Feet — 26 boxes; approximately 4018 items

online icon
The images in this collection were taken by photographer Ron Reis from the 1950s to 1979 and from 2004 to 2014. The earlier body of work (1962-1974) contains 289 black-and-white photographs, accompanied by negatives and contact sheets. The later body of work (2004-2014) contains 3,719 black-and-white and color laser inkjet prints, with a majority of images dated 2012 to 2013. Reis focused his camera on street scenes primarily in New York and New England, but also in Colorado and the midwest, in Europe (Italy, England, Ireland, and Greece), and in the Middle East. His images capture anti-war demonstrations, feminist and gay pride parades, and ethnic festivals, while also documenting the more quotidian life of urban neighborhoods, street markets, and other public spaces such as Speakers' Corner in London's Hyde Park and New York City's Washington Square. The earlier black-and-white gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 inches, while the laser inkjet prints measure 11x17 inches. There are also manuscript and printed materials such as a curriculum vitae, some correspondence, exhibition publicity, articles, and photo essays. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The images in this collection were taken by photographer Ron Reis from the 1950s to 1979 and from 2004 to 2014. The earlier body of work contains 289 black-and-white photographs, accompanied by negatives and contact sheets, and consists of documentary images taken by Reis during the 1960s and 1970s, primarily in Connecticut, London, and New York City, with a smaller number from major European cities. The later body of work contains 3,719 laser inkjet prints of black-and-white and color documentary images taken by Reis in the 2000s, with a majority of images dated 2012 to 2013. Most of these images are of New York City street scenes.

An avid amateur street photographer influenced by Cartier-Bresson, Helen Levitt, and Louis Stettner, Reis focused his camera on street scenes in the United States, Europe, and the Middle East during the 1960s, then in the 2000s. Favorite locations chosen by Reis include London's Hyde Park Speakers' Corner, Portobello flea market, and Trafalgar Square; New York's Bryant Park, Greenwich Village, and Washington Square; and market scenes in Connecticut and Jerusalem. Other images portray anti-Vietnam War protests in Bryant Park, gay pride and ethnic festivals and parades, amusement parks, and other street scenes.

The collection is arranged in three series: Photographs, Negatives, and Manuscript and Print Materials.

The Photographs Series is divided into two chronological subseries: 1954-1979 and 2004-2014. The first subseries contains 289 11x14-inch gelatin silver prints, accompanied by negatives and contact sheets. These black-and-white images were taken by Reis during the 1960s and 1970s, primarily in Connecticut, London, and New York City, with a smaller number from Athens, Barcelona, Como, Dublin, Florence, Jerusalem, London, Rome, and Venice. In general, each 8x10-inch contact sheet is followed by selected prints from the same roll. The prints and contacts are organized chronologically.

The second subseries contains 3,719 inkjet prints, both black-and-white and color, the vast majority measuring 11x17 inches. The prints, taken between 2004 and 2014, consist mostly of New York City street scenes as well as photographs from Reis's trips to Canada, Colorado, Connecticut, Vermont, Maine, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, and North Carolina. These photographs are described at the folder level, with folders containing up to 80 prints.

The Manuscript and Print Materials include an early curriculum vita, some correspondence, exhibition fliers, negative sleeves, articles, and photo essays.

The Negatives Series is arranged by year and month, and titles were taken from original notes on the negative envelopes. They overlap with the prints in the collection to some degree, but there are also negatives present for images that are not currently in the collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

William Gedney photographs and papers, 1887, circa 1920, 1940-1998 and undated, bulk 1955-1989 115.0 Linear Feet — 336 boxes, 1 oversize folder — Approximately 66,800 items

online icon
Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam. The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The breadth of these materials offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision. Additional perspectives on his life and work can be found in his many notebooks and journals; artwork; handmade books; correspondence files; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; audiocassettes; and teaching materials. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The availability of every format in the photographic process offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision.

Additional perspectives come from his many notebooks and journals; artwork, including many sketches and drawings; handmade books and book project materials; correspondence files; memo books; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; and teaching materials, all described in fuller detail in this collection guide. Gedney's writings, in particular, provide extraordinary views into his life and work. Notebooks, memo books, travel diaries, and loose writings contain a compelling mix of personal entries, essays, poetry, quotations, expenses, travel notes, observations on slang, music and book lists, and clippings. Viewed as a whole, Gedney's professional and personal papers record his thoughts on photography, human behavior across continents, society and art, and on his own development as a photographer.

The large exhibit-quality prints, and the large groups of work prints from which they were selected, are arranged in series by bodies of work, in alphabetical order: Composers; England/Ireland; The Farm; India, subdivided into Benares and Calcutta; Night; Nudes; Paris; and United States, further divided into the subseries Kentucky, New York, San Francisco, and U.S Trips. The latter comprises his travels to other states such as Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Montana, and Tennessee. The contact sheets and negatives are described and listed under their own series.

To support himself, Gedney undertook commercial work. There is very early work for a bread company and other firms, and he then worked for Time-Life (and photographed office parties there) and other magazines. There are two larger, significant bodies of other commercial work: the earliest consists of portraits of deaf children and their teachers commissioned around 1958 by the St. Joseph's School for the Deaf. The second project, commissioned by the Social Security Administration in 1969, contains only photographic prints - portraits of rural inhabitants of Hays, Kansas (farmers, pensioners, and widows), and Federal employees. A published catalog is found in this series, listing other photographers involved in the projects. The Social Security Administration's archives hold Gedney's original negatives of this work. During the same period, Gedney visited a state mental hospital in Norton, Kansas and photographed a series of arresting portraits of the young people housed there. These bodies of work have not been published online for copyright and privacy reasons; however, the physical prints are open to onsite use.

For further descriptions of each of Gedney's major bodies of work, please follow the series links in the collection guide, keeping in mind that contact sheets, which offer the most complete set of images in thumbnail size, are represented by their own separate collection guide series.

Many of William Gedney's earliest images incorporate personally-significant locations and people. His first serious photographic study, undertaken in the 1950s, centered on his grandparents and their dairy farm in Norton Hill, New York. During this period, Gedney also photographed neighborhoods in his birthplace, Albany, and his hometown of Greenville. Later photographs of friends and family in New York (Arnold and Anita Lobel), San Francisco (Eric Hoffer and Lili Osborne), and Paris (photographer Raghubir Singh and wife Anne Henning) are found throughout the collection, as well as a few shots of his mentors Lee Friedlander and Diane Arbus. Self-portraits of Gedney show up frequently in the contact sheet images but there are no known larger images of the photographer.

Gedney was particularly drawn to human gatherings. He photographed people not only on Brooklyn's streets, but also at parties, car and flower shows, motorcycle rallies, body building exhibitions (where he also photographed Diane Arbus), and in bars and at Coney Island boardwalk and beaches. Early series include African American parades and gospel revivals. He continued to focus on crowds everywhere he traveled, particularly in large cities such as San Francisco (where he photographed Golden Gate gatherings in 1966-1967), Los Angeles, Chicago, London, and Paris, often turning his camera to young people and their street culture. In the 1960s he also documented organized labor rallies and migrant programs in Southern California (Cesar Chavez appears in several images), and in the 1970s, important marches and rallies for gay rights in California and New York.

The photographic series also house a handful of large copy prints and contact sheets of Gedney images printed by photographers Margaret Sartor, Julie Stovall and others affiliated with the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies. Finally, there is also a cluster of late 1980s contact sheets and prints processed by Gedney's former student and close friend Peter Bellamy from rolls of film found among Gedney's belongings at his death.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Preferred source for image titles: titles as written by Gedney on the backs of photographic prints. Second preferred source: titles on index cards prepared by Gedney for individual best-quality prints. Third source: captions written by Gedney on contact sheets, describing photo sequences. When no title was found, library staff have used "No title known."

Folder- and group-level titles for work prints, negatives, and papers were devised by library staff in the 1990s and 2010s, and are noted as such when known. Many if not most of these were derived from Gedney's original folder labels and notes; in the absence of an original description, titles have been devised by library staff.