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Bedford-Stuyvesant Community Cooperative audio tapes, 1966-1967 1.5 Linear Feet — Five boxes, including three boxes containing 33 audio tapes, and two boxes containing preservation master and use copies on 124 compact discs.

Thirty-three 1/4-inch open-reel audio tapes recording meetings of various directors and committee members of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Community Cooperative, especially the founders, Gerald Schaflander and Henry Etzkowitz. Issues discussed include disagreements, employment and firings, stealing, finances, violence and gang fights, drugs, students, the FBI, and black and white division of labor. Notes on some of the boxes include names of persons involved, events, quotes, and content.

Thirty-three 1/4-inch open-reel audio tapes recording meetings of various directors and committee members of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Community Cooperative, especially the founders, Gerald Schaflander and Henry Etzkowitz. Issues discussed include disagreements, employment and firings, stealing, finances, violence and gang fights, drugs, students, the FBI, and black and white division of labor. Notes on some of the boxes include names of persons involved, events, quotes, and content.

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David X. Young films, 1955-2007 12.5 Linear Feet — Seven boxes of film reels, one box of video- and audio-cassettes, and one box of CDs and DVDs.

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Collection consists of 8mm and 16mm films, videocassettes, compact discs, and audiocassettes, deriving from artist David X. Young's work in New York City, Cape Cod, and Haiti. His New York work includes films of W. Eugene Smith working in his loft studio in 1971, as well as experimental films dating from the 1950s to the 1980s. Homemade audiocassette mix tapes document Young's interest in jazz as well as his piano playing. Videocassettes consist of reference copies of several films and television programs on W. Eugene Smith. This collection is part of the Archive of Documentary Arts. Original recordings are closed to research access pending reformatting.

The David X. Young Films, 1955-2007, includes film reels, videocassettes, and audiocassettes produced primarily by artist David X. Young between 1955 and 1996, in New York City, Cape Cod, and Haiti. Although transferred to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the Rubenstein Library in 2012, the collection was originally acquired from Young’s estate by the Center for Documentary Studies, for use by Sam Stephenson in his research on W. Eugene Smith for the book The Jazz Loft Project (2010). As a consequence, nearly half the collection is comprised of materials relating to Young’s involvement in the production of "Let Truth Be The Prejudice," a half-hour documentary on Smith produced by CBS in 1971, as part of its Lamp Unto My Feet series. These materials include a composite print of the final 28-minute program, un-synced picture and soundtrack reels not used in the final program, and videocassette and disc copies of the reels created by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2007.

The balance of the collection consists primarily of elements related to film projects created by Young between 1955 and 1986, including Klaximo, Seven Haitian Moods, Duck Season. Many of the elements in the collection, representing these and other projects, were spooled--put together on one reel--to facilitate video transfer previous to the films being acquired by the Center for Documentary Studies.

In addition to these films, the collection contains nine audiocassette tapes, including radio broadcasts of music and spoken-word material, as well as one recording of David X. Young playing piano, and four VHS videocassette tapes, from television broadcasts of programs on W. Eugene Smith.

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Gaess Outdoor was a family-owned outdoor advertising company founded in the 1930s in northern New Jersey, serving the New Jersey-Metropolitan New York market. It was acquired in 1997 by Universal Outdoor, a subsidiary of Clear Channel Communications, Inc. The Gaess Outdoor Advertising Photographs collection spans the decades of the 1950s and 1960s and includes black-and-white photographs and negatives of painted and blank billboard structures, locations, proposed locations and competitors' billboards. Clients include Budweiser (Anheuser-Busch), Cities Service (Citgo), Gulf Oil, Schaefer and Schlitz. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Gaess Outdoor Advertising Photographs collection spans the decades of the 1950s and 1960s and includes black-and-white photographs and negatives of painted and blank billboard structures, locations, proposed locations and competitors' billboards. Clients include Budweiser (Anheuser-Busch), Cities Service, Gulf Oil, Schaefer and Schlitz.

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Locus, the Magazine of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Field, was co-founded by Charles N. Brown (1937-2009), Ed Meskys (1936-), and Dave Vanderwerf (1944-) in New York in 1968. It first began as a science-fiction and fantasy one-sheet news fanzine that was created to help the Boston Science Fiction Group win its 1971 Worldcon bid. Vanderwerf left after issue #4, and Meskys after #11. Charles Brown remained as editor until his death in 2009. The Locus Archives include names files for more than 800 people, many of whom are writers, editors, or publishers. The files contain correspondence, clippings, obituaries, and writings, the bulk of which relate to American writers, though there are several files kept on writers and fans from across the world, including China, Japan, and Russia. Much of the correspondence is about publishing news, corrections, and deaths in the science-fiction, fantasy, and horror community. There are several well-known correspondents including: Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov, Jim Baen, Ian and Betty Ballantine, Algis Budrys, Octavia E. Butler, Arthur C. Clarke, L. Sprague de Camp, Harlan Ellison, Robert Heinlein, Ursula K. Le Guin, Dean Koontz, Andre Alice Norton, James Tiptree, Jr. (Alice Sheldon), and Gene Wolfe.

Collection includes names files for more than 800 people, many of whom are writers, editors, or publishers. The files contain correspondence, clippings, obituaries, and writings, the bulk of which relate to American writers, though there are several files kept on writers and fans from across the world, including China, Japan, and Russia. Much of the correspndence is about publishing news, corrections, and deaths in the science-fiction, fantasy, and horror community. There are several well-known correspondents including: Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov, Jim Baen, Ian and Betty Ballantine, Algis Budrys, Octavia E. Butler, Arthur C. Clarke, L. Sprague de Camp, Harlan Ellison, Robert Heinlein, Ursula K. Le Guin, Dean Koontz, Andre Alice Norton, James Tiptree, Jr. (Alice Sheldon), and Gene Wolfe.