Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Place North Carolina -- History Remove constraint Place: North Carolina -- History

Search Results

collection icon

Alvin T. Parnell photographs of Durham, North Carolina, circa 1898-1986, bulk 1910-1960 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 183 items — 2 boxes; 183 items

Alvin T. Parnell was a commercial photographer based in Durham, N.C. Collection chiefly consists of 167 black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority, chiefly taken by Parnell from 1920 through the 1950s, are views of downtown streets, commercial and industrial buildings, churches, and infrastructure, especially transportation. Many sites are related to the tobacco manufacturing businesses based in Durham. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. Other images range widely and include a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, a minstrel band, a cart advertising Bull Durham tobacco, and tobacco fields with posed workers, white and African American. In addition, there are portraits of prominent Durham individuals and families. Formats include 85 vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, chiefly 8x10 inches, 82 contact prints, and 12 safety negatives. Includes an information folder with 1986 obituary and collection information.

Collection comprises 167 early to mid-20th century black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority of the images were taken by Alvin T. Parnell, a commercial photographer with a studio in downtown Durham, from about 1920 to 1950; prints from 1898 to 1919 likely were from the Cole-Holladay studio, which Parnell took over around 1920. Formats include a few vintage mounted albumen and gelatin silver prints, unmounted vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, and small contact prints made from original nitrate negatives. There are also twelve safety film negatives present, from which some copy prints were made. Includes an information folder with Parnell's 1986 obituary and collection information.

The largest group of photographs, taken from the late 1910s through the early 1950s, features views of Durham's growing downtown, often commissioned by Parnell's business and City Hall clients. In the background of the many street scenes one can see the progression of small storefront businesses that made up life on Main Street in a 20th century Southern Piedmont city. Given Durham's role as a birthplace for the post-Civil War tobacco manufacturing industry, it is not surprising that there are numerous photographs of buildings and industrial sites belonging to American Tobacco, Blackwell Tobacco, and Liggett Myers. Parnell also photographed buses, trolleys, and other scenes for an early Durham power and transportation company, Durham Public Services.

Other images focus on people, and range widely in subject matter: men posed at a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, fraternities, children on a playground, and a minstrel band. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. There are also portraits of prominent individuals and families: an elderly Bennehan Cameron with family members; John Ruffin Green (one of Durham's earliest tobacco entrepreneurs); Washington Duke and sons with associates at a barbeque; the Rosenstein family (optometrists from New York who came to Durham in 1904); William Umstead (U.S. Senator from northern Durham County); and various police chiefs and businessmen. There are also a few portraits of women, some with captions and some unidentified.

There are also twelve safety film negatives in the collection, sized 8x10 and 4x5 inches, from which a selection of copy prints were made after the collection was acquired. A few have no existing prints – these are noted in the collection guide.

In addition to photographs in this collection, some if not most of the earlier images of Durham in the Durham Chamber of Commerce collection in the Rubenstein Library are likely to have been taken by Parnell. His work is also likely to be found in other collections related to Durham residents containing photographs.

collection icon
Early female graduate of Duke University School of Medicine (M.D., 1946) and pediatrician in private practice in Durham Co., N.C., 1949-1987. The bulk of the papers of Bailey Daniel Webb consist of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Bailey Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, chiefly in community medicine and governance, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore. Records containing personally-identifiable medical information, chiefly pediatric case histories, have been segregated and are closed to use.

The bulk of the collection consists of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore.

Papers also include memoirs, largely in verse and written by Webb's grandmother, about slaves on her father's plantation; and an album of sayings related to "Poplar Forest," a home built by Thomas Jefferson, where a relative lived in 1970. The album's cover has an early photograph of the house pasted on. There is also a small amount of information on the histories of Wilson and Wright high schools in North Carolina and a few church histories as well.

Other folders making up approximately a quarter of the collection contain Bailey Webb's professional correspondence and papers relating to her career as a pediatrician and medical community leader in various towns and cities of North Carolina. Correspondents include members of the Trent and Semans families. Includes Webb's diplomas, typewritten memoirs of her career, begining with her medical school training at Duke in the 1940s. A few of these volumes contain patient information and photos - these are currently closed to use.

collection icon
Charles Leonard Van Noppen (1869-1935) was a publisher, editor, and author, from Greensboro, N.C. The collection contains letters and papers, mostly relating to the projected extension of Samuel A'Court Ashe's book, Biographical history of North Carolina from colonial times to the present (1908-1925). Collection also contains 356 black-and-white photographs and engravings, almost exclusively 19th century portraits of prominent male North Carolinians.

This collection contains 250 brief unpublished biographical sketches of prominent North Carolinians prepared for use in a projected extension of Samuel A. Ashe's, "Biographical History of North Carolina From Colonial Times to the Present." Other papers in the collection include printed forms returned by persons from whom biographical information had been requested, reviews of Ashe's Biographical History of North Carolina, an album entitled "Platinotypes of English Cathedrals", published in London by Eyre & Spottiswode as well as personal letters and papers of Van Noppen. The collection also includes 356 black and white photographs and engravings almost exclusively 19th Centruy portraits of prominent male North Carolinians.

collection icon

Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes papers, 1811-1990s and undated, bulk 1905-1981, bulk 1905-1981 6.2 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — Approximately 4650 items — 4650 Items

Collection consists of research materials, correspondence, writings, clippings and other printed materials, and a few photographs, mainly from the latter half of Gohdes's career. The earliest date (1811) refers to reproductions of original research materials. Correspondence with other American Literature teachers and authors, combined with other materials relating to Gohdes's institutional and organizational affiliations, in particular with Duke University, the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the journal AMERICAN LITERATURE, comprise the most substantive aspects of this collection. They provide insight into American literary scholarship in the early and mid-twentieth century. Noted authors and scholars of the time whose letters and other writings are in the collection include Alexander Blackburn, Oscar Cargill, Lewis Chase, Robert Elias, Norman Foerster, Arthur Rubin, Arthur Quinn, and Upton Sinclair. Original manuscripts by Gohdes, inscribed reprints of writings by his colleagues, and materials relating to many major British and American literary figures, make up the rest of the collection. There is substantial material on Edgar Allen Poe and American humor. The collection also includes papers documenting Gohdes's research and writing for his last book project, a history of the muscadine grape in North Carolina entitled Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography

The Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes Papers date from 1811 to the 1990s, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1905 to 1981. Collection consists of research materials, correspondence, writings, clippings and other printed materials, and a few photographs, mainly from the latter half of Gohdes's career. The earliest date (1811) refers to reproductions of original materials used in his research. Correspondence with other American Literature teachers and authors, combined with other materials relating to Gohdes's institutional and organizational affiliations, in particular with Duke University, the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the journal AMERICAN LITERATURE, comprise the most substantive aspects of this collection. They provide insight into the bureaucratic and institutional exigencies of American literary scholarship in the early and mid-twentieth century. Noted authors and scholars of the time whose letters and other writings are in the collection include Alexander Blackburn, Oscar Cargill, Lewis Chase, Robert Elias, Norman Foerster, Arthur Rubin, Arthur Quinn, and Upton Sinclair. Original manuscripts by Gohdes, inscribed reprints of writings by his colleagues, and materials relating to many major British and American literary figures, make up the rest of the collection. There is substantial material on Edgar Allen Poe and American humor. The collection also includes papers documenting Gohdes's research and writing for his last book project, a history of the muscadine grape entitled Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines.

The Gohdes Papers are divided into seven series: Biographical Data, Correspondence, Author Files, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, Scuppernong , and Clippings.

The Biographical Data Series briefly sketches the major events of Gohdes's life. It consists of only a few items, including a one-page sketch by Gohdes of his career's highlights, and photocopies of Gohdes's obituaries. Further biographical information, especially pertaining to Gohdes's academic life, can be culled from materials in the Correspondence Series.

The Correspondence Series contains letters exchanged with university administrators, publishers, colleagues, librarians, and literary figures. The series is divided into four subseries, American Literature , Lewis Chase, Duke University, and General. The bulk of the correspondence concerns professional and academic affairs, such as appointments, editorships, research and reviews, and publishing. Included are exchanges between Gohdes and Duke University administrators about English Department and American Literature affairs, as well as between Gohdes and contemporary literary critics about the study of American literature. There are also several documents that illuminate Gohdes's political affiliations and social concerns.

Materials on approximately fifty authors, largely major British and American writers, are in the Author Files Series and were originally gathered by Gohdes and his colleague, Lewis Chase. The folders contain a variety of information on the represented authors, in an equally varied mix of formats: clippings, notes, lectures, student papers, photographs, and reproductions or photocopies of original writing.

Included in the Subject Files Series are materials relating to several projects and interests which engaged Gohdes during his career. These include: bibliographies, poetry, travel narratives and the American West, and the United Nations' Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)/American Literature Section's Best American Books List. The bibliographies collected in this series reflect Gohdes's interest in this genre, as he participated in and edited many such projects throughout his career.

The Writings and Speeches Series contains manuscript and printed materials in two subseries: Writings by Gohdes and Writings by Others. The Writings by Gohdes Subseries includes manuscripts of short stories, poetry, and academic essays, as well as notes and notecards. The manuscripts also contain folders pertaining to unfinished projects and writings. The Writings by Gohdes Subseries also contains several folders of printed materials, consisting of reprints and reproductions of as well as advertising and promotional materials for Gohdes's published writings. This subseries consists almost entirely of reprints that are inscribed to Gohdes by the authors.

Materials relating to the writing and research of Gohdes's last published book, Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines, are in the Scuppernong Series. Three subseries make up this series: Correspondence, Research and Notes, and Publication Materials. Correspondence plus photocopied articles and essays about the grape and agricultural production form the bulk of the series. Also included are Gohdes's many notes and notecards, as well as reviews and materials relating to the book's publication.

The Clippings Series contains the few clippings that are not housed in the Author Files Series. These clippings mostly consist of articles relating to literary figures.

Related collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library include the records of American Literature and the Modern Language Association's American Literature Section, as well as the papers of many of Gohdes's colleagues, such as Jay B. Hubbell and Arlin Turner.

Processing Note:

Roman numerals and transcribed titles taken from the original folders have been appended to certain folders, such as the Contemporary Poetry Selections.

Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.

collection icon

Eugene Clyde Brooks papers, 1774-1971 and undated 4.1 Linear Feet — 3,105 Items

Professor of Education at Trinity College, Durham NC. Collection chiefly is composed of letters, educational reports, numerous writings and addresses, and various professional papers, all relating to tobacco relief, education, and agriculture in North Carolina. Specific topics cover the Department of Education of what was then known as Trinity College in Durham, N.C.; the history of North Carolina, from an unpublished draft; and the matter of education for rural populations in N.C. and elsewhere. Materials include a microfilm of Brooks' papers held by the Department of Archives and History in Raleigh, N.C.; telegrams; extensive manuscripts for unpublished works, lecture notes, an address by Supt. Benjamin Lee Smith of Greensboro Public Schools. Other items in the collection include a scrapbook; cards from Brooks to his wife from abroad; original poems written by Brooks; photographs; memorabilia; an itinerary of his trip with other agricultural experts to Europe; a contract in manuscript drawn up in 1774 between citizens of Mecklenburg Co. and John Patterson, a school teacher, who was engaged to teach there; a printed document concerning Judge Walter Clark; and other miscellaneous items. There is also a printed copy of the diary of Dr. J. F. Shaffner, Sr. and blueprints of the N.C. State Fairgrounds.

Collection chiefly is composed of letters, educational reports, numerous writings and addresses, and various professional papers, all relating to tobacco relief, education, and agriculture in North Carolina. Specific topics cover the Department of Education of what was then known as Trinity College in Durham, N.C.; the history of North Carolina, from an unpublished draft; and the matter of education for rural populations in N.C. and elsewhere. Materials include a microfilm of Brooks' papers held by the Department of Archives and History in Raleigh, N.C.; telegrams; extensive manuscripts for unpublished works, lecture notes, and an address by Supt. Benjamin Lee Smith of Greensboro Public Schools. Other items in the collection include a scrapbook; cards from Brooks to his wife from abroad; original poems written by Brooks; photographs; memorabilia; an itinerary of his trip with other agricultural experts to Europe; a contract in manuscript drawn up in 1774 between citizens of Mecklenburg Co. and John Patterson, a school teacher, who was engaged to teach there; a printed document concerning Judge Walter Clark; and other miscellaneous items. There is also a printed copy of the diary of Dr. J. F. Shaffner, Sr. and blueprints of the N.C. State Fairgrounds.

collection icon
Anne and Frank Warner were folklorists and folk song musicians. The Anne and Frank Warner Collection, with materials from as early as 1899 to as late as 2000, documents the Warners' active life of collecting, recording, and producing music and publications associated with traditional American folk song culture, primarily from along the eastern seaboard areas, in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina, and as far as New Hampshire to the north.

The Anne and Frank Warner Collection, with materials dating from 1899 to 2000, is a record of the Warners' active life of collecting, recording, and producing music and publications associated with traditional American folk song culture and African-American music traditions, primarily from along the eastern seaboard areas, in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina, and as far as New Hampshire to the north. The bulk of the materials date from the 1930s through the 1980s, and are organized into six series: Correspondence; Subject Files; Folk Materials; Writings; Audiovisual Materials; and Prints and Negatives. Through handwritten correspondence with a wide variety of folk singers and musicians, subject files, printed materials, film, video, photographs, and the Warners' own studio albums of folk songs, these materials document early methods for recording and collecting songs - the 20th century development of American ethnomusicology. Moreover, as an invaluable resource for studies in traditional American folk life, the collection also includes field audio recordings and photographs of folk singers, songwriters, and musicians in their element, at home with their families, singing and playing their instruments. Notable individuals referred to in the Warner Collection include: William Rose Benet, Carl Carmer, Bill Doerflinger, Lena Bourne Fish, ("Yankee") John Galusha, David Grimes (of the Philco Corporation), Wayland Hand, Rena and Nathan Hicks, Buna Vista and Roby Monroe Hicks, Ray Hicks, Peter and Beryl Kennedy, Alan Lomax, Bessie and Frank Proffitt, Carolyn Rabson, Carl Sandburg, Pete Seeger, Charles K. ("Tink") Tillett and family, and Charles L. Todd. The Warners were actively involved with a number of organizations, among them: the American Folklore Society, the Country Dance and Song Society of America, Duke University, the Library of Congress, the Newport Folk Foundation, the New York State Historical Association, and the YMCA. The Warners published a number of essays concerning traditional American folk culture and music in Think Weekly, the Appalachian Journal, Country Dance and Song, the Long Island Forum, A Celebration of American Family Folklore, and Come for to Sing. In addition to these, Ann Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs in the Frank and Anne Warner Collection, 1984, remains the authoritative compendium of the Warners' research in and collection of traditional American folk music.

The Warners' personal and professional relationships with various people and organizations can be traced through materials in the Correspondence Series, 1934-1985. Significant exchanges with the American Folklore Society, the Library of Congress, with William Rose Benet, Carl Carmer, Wayland Hand, Alan Lomax, Carl Sandburg, and Pete Seeger are extensively documented in the files. More correspondence can be found elsewhere in the collection - organized topically in the Subject Series, and according to correspondents' names in the Folk Materials Series.

The Subject Files Series, 1899-1984, houses documentary materials that give a wider context to the Warners' life and work. This series includes information about the Warners' genealogies, Frank Warner's work with youth and his career in the YMCA, material germane to the lawsuit that developed over the song "Tom Dooley," information on and clips about various performances and recordings, and other materials.

The Folk Materials Series, 1938-1982, contains correspondence between the Warners and many of the traditional American folk singers and musicians that they visited; for some of the individuals there is more information than correspondence alone. This series is organized by state, city or region, and then individual or family, for example: North Carolina, Appalachia, Rena and Nathan Hicks. The states represented are: North Carolina, New Hampshire, New York, Virginia, and West Virginia. The Warners' correspondence with both Rena and Nathan Hicks and Bessie and Frank Proffitt comprise the most extensive files. The series materials provide essential documentation for understanding the communities and the world views of the musicians.

The Writings Series, 1938-1985, contains a variety of materials, including documents that the Warners published in journals dedicated to folk life; grant applications; materials germane to the production and publication of Anne Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs; words to recorded and unrecorded folk songs in the collection, including some songs by Frank Warner; and Anne Warner's hand-written field research journals and notebooks.

An extensive collection of songs, interviews, and other recordings on audio tape reels, cassette tapes, phonograph albums, and compact discs are housed in the Audiovisual Materials Series, 1940-2000. Several motion picture films and video tape recordings also document the Warners' work and performances. Many of the items in the Audiovisual Materials Series are documented in written form in the Writings Series, including the sound recordings of folk songs and interviews collected in the Library of Congress master tapes, and which are not included in Anne Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs.

The Prints and Negatives Series, 1933-1969, extends the Warner collection's scope to include photographic images as well. There are 239 black and white prints, which are arranged alpha-numerically into lots from Lot 1 through Lot 9E. Within the lots, the prints are identified by number. In the pictures, the Warners have captured images of many traditional American folk musicians and singers. The Warners themselves appear frequently throughout the collection. The photographic documentation of the Warners' travels contains pictures of folk singers and their homes and families, including: Nathan, Roby Monroe, Buna Vista, Ray and Linzy Hicks; Lena Bourne Fish; Bessie and Frank Proffitt; the Tillett family; Louis Solomon; and Carl Sandburg.

collection icon

Gwyn B. Price papers, 1924-1972 18 Linear Feet — Approximately 13,726 Items

Long-time employee of the North Carolina Rural Electrification Authority and resident of Raleigh, N.C. Chiefly clippings on rural electrification amassed by Price during his long employment with the North Carolina Rural Electrification Authority. Also includes correspondence; a typescript of The Story of a Mountain Missionary, Rev. James Floyd Fletcher, 1858-1946 by A. J. Fletcher of Raleigh; and a mimeographed copy of Rural Electrification in North Carolina by Joseph Deutsch (Chapel Hill, 1944).

Chiefly clippings on rural electrification amassed by Gwyn B. Price during his long employment with the North Carolina Rural Electrification Authority. Also includes correspondence; a typescript of "The Story of a Mountain Missionary, Rev. James Floyd Fletcher, 1858-1946" by A. J. Fletcher of Raleigh; and a mimeographed copy of "Rural Electrification in North Carolina" by Joseph Deutsch (Chapel Hill, 1944).

collection icon

Henry Nathaniel Oakes papers, 1904-1974 9.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 5000 Items

Henry Nathaniel Oakes was a minister from North Carolina; he received his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 1974. Collection consists of research material for and drafts of Oakes's Ph.D. dissertation, which focuses on the career of Robert Elijah Jones (1872—1960), the first African American elected to the episcopacy in the former Methodist Episcopal Church (1920). Oakes's materials document the relationship between Jones and his close friend Booker T. Washington, Jones's accomodationist approach to racial integration, as well as the black struggle for equality in the predominantly white Methodist Episcopal Church in the first half of the twentieth century. Among Oakes's research papers are many folders of typed notes excerpting and commenting on Jones's statements made from 1905 to 1920 on abolition, African American business, mob violence and lynching, education, and politics. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The papers of Henry Nathaniel Oakes chiefly consist of research material for and drafts of Oakes's 1973 Ph.D. dissertation, which focuses on the career of Robert Elijah Jones (1872—1960), the first African American Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, elected in 1920. Jones was born in Greensboro, North Carolina. Oakes's materials document the relationship between Jones and his close friend Booker T. Washington, Jones's accomodationist approach to racial integration, as well as the black struggle for equality in the predominantly white Methodist Episcopal Church in the first half of the twentieth century.

The earliest dates (1904-1940s) derive from photocopied research materials pertaining to the period during which Robert Jones was active, chiefly from Methodist publications, including reports, newsclippings, articles, and correspondence. These materials contain exceprts and notes on comments Jones made from 1905 to 1920 on abolition, African American business, mob violence and lynching, education, and politics. Also among the research papers are typed notes Henry Oakes took on an unidentified work by Robert E. Jones. Typewritten notes are typically annotated with many hand-written comments and underlined passages. Handwritten notes are often found on the backs of re-used elementary school worksheets.

Additional materials in the collection include University of Iowa forms and policies; correspondence between Oakes and members of the Jones family and Univ. of Iowa faculty; a set of typed transcripts of six or seven interviews conducted by Oakes with Jones family members, ministers, and other individuals; a set of black-and-white photographs of Jones, his immediate family, and Church officials; and five microfilm reels.

Mold remediation has been carried out by Conservation staff on selected portions of the collection. To facilitate access to severely damaged items, photocopies are available for use and are housed alongside the originals.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

collection icon

Nate Larson photographs, 2015 1 Linear Foot — 2 boxes; 63 items; 13 x 19 inches

Collection comprises a set of 48 color photographs, 13 reproductions of historic postcards, and several introductory panels, from a project by photographer and artist Nate Larson entitled "Map of All the Railroads," inspired by H.V. Poor's "Map of All the Railroads in the United States in Operation and Progress" (1854). The 13x19 inch digital color photographs, taken in 2015, explore social and economic aspects of thirteen railroad-centered cities and towns identified in Poor's publication, and their progress and potential future. Images feature cityscapes, railroad tracks, buildings and businesses, abandoned sites, monuments, several portraits of people, and other subjects. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises set of 48 color photographs, 13 reproductions of historic postcards, and several introductory panels, part of a project by photographer and artist Nate Larson entitled "Map of All the Railroads," inspired by H.V. Poor's "Map of all the Railroads in the United States in Operation and Progress" (1854). The 13x19 inch digital color photographs, taken in 2015, explore social and economic aspects of thirteen railroad-centered North Carolina cities and towns identified in Poor's book, and their progress and potential future.

The cities are: Charlotte, Concord, Gaston, Goldsboro, Greensboro, Halifax, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Salisbury, Warrenton, Wayne, Whiteville, and Wilmington. Images include views of businesses, cemeteries, railroad tracks and crossings, monuments, construction sites, abandoned buildings, and several portraits of people.

The artist's statement reads: "In November 2105, I visited twelve of these cities and the site of one former city to survey their progress and contemplate their future. These photographs are observations of the man-altered American landscape and seek to understand of the human experience within it. The images function as a meditation on the passage of time, shifting dynamics of progress and development, and the peculiarities of historic events that shape the present."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

Robert Coleman Price papers, 1866-1971 0.5 Linear Feet — 52 Items

Chiefly genealogical materials gathered by Robert Price and others, mostly pertaining to the Price family. Includes genealogical charts, typescripts, and correspondence.

Chiefly genealogical materials gathered by Robert Price and others, mostly pertaining to the Price family. Includes genealogical charts, typescripts, and correspondence.