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The photographs of Cedric N. Chatterley span the years 1983-2013, and were created throughout his career as a documentary photographer, beginning with his MFA thesis project on religious experience in the U.S. The photographs are primarily black-and-white prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 18x24 inches. The most prominent themes in Chatterley's work are labor, community, and religious expression. He has photographed chicken slaughterhouse workers in Maine; Cambodian immigrants in North Carolina; David "Honeyboy" Edwards and other Southern blues musicians in Mississippi and on tour; a substance abusers' rehabilitation community in Durham, N.C.; tornado survivors in South Dakota; an abandoned religious theme park in Connecticut; and sheep rancher Judith Fae "Pachy" Burns in Montana. Some of his documentary work also includes oral history interviews. There are also several recordings of interviews with Chatterley, where he speaks about his work as a documentary photographer, and a book by Barbara Lau containing his photographs of Cambodian immigrants. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographs of Cedric N. Chatterley span the years 1983-2013, and were created throughout his career as a documentary photographer, beginning with his Master in Fine Arts thesis project, "Ambivalent Ecstasies/Converging Energies," on American religious experience. The photographs are primarily black-and-white gelatin silver prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 18x24 inches.

The most prominent themes in Chatterley's work are labor, community, and religious expression. He has photographed chicken slaughterhouse workers in Maine; Cambodian immigrants in North Carolina, a project undertaken with Barbara Lau of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University; David "Honeyboy" Edwards and other Southern blues musicians in Mississippi and on tour; a substance abusers' rehabilitation community in Durham, N.C., also with Barbara Lau; tornado survivors in South Dakota who rebuilt their town over a period of ten years; Holy Land USA, an abandoned religious theme park in Connecticut; and a woman sheep rancher's work during lambing season in Montana. Some of the images were taken with Chatterley's hand-built cameras.

A final series consists of materials relating to Barbara Lau's book, From Cambodia to Greensboro, documenting Cambodian immigrants in North Carolina, that includes images taken by Chatterley, and a set of recorded interviews from 2008 in which Chatterley speaks about his career as a documentary photographer. The cassettes have been converted to digital files and use copies are available for access. Original recordings are closed to use.

Series are arranged in chronological order; prints are numbered and captioned by the photographer.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Five Farms: Stories From American Farm Families photographs and oral histories, 2008-2009 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes; 50 color photographic prints; 940 electronic files (54.6 megabytes) — 50 prints; 940 electronic files

The Center for Documentary Studies is a center at Duke University established for the study of the documentary process. The color photographs and oral histories in the Five Farms: Stories From American Farm Families collection form part of a multimedia project carried out under the auspices of the Center for Documentary Studies. Beginning in March 2008, photographers Alix Lowrey Blair, Andrew Lewis, Tom Rankin, Elena Rue, and Steve Schapiro, along with audio specialists Ben Adler, Rob Dillard, Camille Lacapa, Susannah Lee, and John Biewen, each visited an American farm and documented the farm families' experiences over the course of a year. The locations for the Five Farms series are: a family farm on the Hopi Reservation in northeastern Arizona; an organic farm in California's Capay Valley; a dairy farm in western Massachusetts; a diversified farm in central Iowa; and an African American-owned hog farm in eastern North Carolina. Details on each farm are found in the series descriptions in this collection guide. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The color photographs and oral histories in the Five Farms: Stories From American Farm Families collection form part of a multimedia project carried out under the auspices of the Center for Documentary Studies. Beginning in March 2008, photographers Alix Lowrey Blair, Andrew Lewis, Tom Rankin, Elena Rue, and Steve Schapiro, along with audio specialists Ben Adler, Rob Dillard, Camille Lacapa, Susannah Lee, and John Biewen, each visited an American farm and documented the farm families' experiences over the course of a year. The locations for the Five Farms series are: a family farm on the Hopi Reservation in northeastern Arizona; an organic farm in California's Capay Valley; a dairy farm in western Massachusetts; a diversified farm in central Iowa; and an African American-owned hog farm in eastern North Carolina. Details on each farm are found in the series descriptions in this collection guide.

The photographs in the collection, chosen for the 2009 project exhibit, portray farmers and family members, farm workers, farm animals, and landscapes. The first set of 25 13x16-inch color digital prints, five from each photographer, is accompanied by a second set of 25 prints of the same images, but in varying sizes ranging from 12 1/8 x 17 inches to 13 3/8 x 20 inches. All prints are arranged and foldered by geographical location. The photographer's names are written on the back of all the prints, and the captions are also included on the backs of the prints in the first set.

The oral history interviews and short sound files, over 100 hours of recordings, provide many details on the lives of the families, typical activities on each farm, the local culture and natural environments, and thoughts of individuals on the past, present, and the future. Also included are digital files containing ambient sounds, theme music, and credits, all used in a five-part Public Media radio program broadcast in July 2009. Although most of the files are currently stored in .wav format, there are also a handfule of mp3 files.

The Five Farms project culminated in an exhibit from April 27-August 21, 2009 at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies; other outreach included a multimedia website and programs on public radio stations nationwide.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Jennifer Stratton photographs, 2014-2015 23 item — 1 box, 1 oversize folder

This collection includes 23 photographic prints comprising the series Where We Live: A North Carolina Portrait. Photographs taken by Jennifer Jacklin Stratton throughout the state of North Carolina in 2014-2015.

Includes prints from Stratton's participation in the Where We Live project, inspired by Alex Harris's 1971-1972 North Carolina work. Collection contains 23 color photographs printed on Hahnemuhle “13 x 19” 320g Fine Art Pearl Photo Rag. The first 12 prints were intended for inclusion in the spring 2016 Where We Live: A Portrait of North Carolina exhibition at the Rubenstein Gallery. North Carolina counties represented include Halifax, Robeson, Sampson, Nash, and Cumberland. Stratton included the following text about her work:

"What we call the beginning is often the end. To make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start. -- T.S. Eliot In making these photographs I immersed myself in Alex Harris' original 1971-72 North Carolina work, and embraced his instinct to roam widely and to engage the people he met with his camera. At first this comprised of a lot of wandering through places I had never been and getting to know people along the way. It also included choosing the unpredictability of working with a 1960s medium format camera lacking a light meter and focusing mechanism – all attempts to sense what has changed in the past forty four years and what still lingers – both in photography and in the landscape. Since 1971, there are many more people, like myself, who now call North Carolina home. Between 2000 and 2010 alone, North Carolina gained almost 1.5 million residents. As I began to photograph, I kept stumbling across the statistic that the state has more factory-farmed hogs (10.1 million) than people (9.5 million). I wondered how has this significant population growth of both livestock and people impacted environmental resources, waste disposal and energy consumption throughout the state? I wanted to explore making photographs of something difficult to see: our biological need to live in a place with access to drinkable water, breathable air, healthy soil, an impulse that ultimately connects us all. In North Carolina there is a strong historical correlation between poverty and environmental degradation. In the late 1970’s midnight dumpers deliberately dripped PCBs in fourteen counties along more than two hundred miles of highway, leading to protests in Warren County that made national news. In 2014, I followed much the same route as this highway by photographing along the proposed path for the planned Atlantic Coast Pipeline project. I found several of the counties on this route have previous histories of environmental injustice. By photographing some of the people who live in these counties under daily environmental threats such as refuse dumping, expanding landfills, industrial animal farms, and coal ash, I sought to make personal and visible the complexities of shifting state-wide developments. Long-time residents continue to endure the emptying of downtowns and homes while bearing witness to the physical degradation of the air, water, and land around them. In this corridor of environmental injustice and socioeconmic disparities, the sustainability of family life for future generations is in question.

There is loss in the landscape, but also change and growth. I do not think it is possible to put into words all that I have gained bonding to place and people through making this work. This was an opportunity to engage with the diverse perspectives that exist within a singular place. As I entered neighborhoods a stranger with my camera, I was welcomed far more than I was turned away. I found my purpose in making these photographs was as Robert Adams writes, 'to try to be coherent about the intuition and hope' I had found."

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Lindsey and Brown photographs, circa 1890 2 Linear Feet — 53 Items

Photographers of Asheville, NC. Photographs (chiefly cabinet cards produced by Lindsey and Brown) of street scenes, landscapes, and tourist attractions in late 19th-century western N.C. Descriptive text is printed on the reverse side of many of the photographs. Most photographs were taken in the vicinity of the Swannanoa, Hot Springs, the French Broad River, Round Knob, Hickory Nut Gap, Buck Forest, Highlands, and Asheville. Contains photographs of the Battery Park Hotel, Chimney Rock, Hooker's Mill, McElroy Tunnel, Devil's Pulpit, Paint Rock, the Seven Sisters, the Swannanoa tunnel stockade, the Murphy Division, Devil's Slip Gap, the Western North Carolina Railroad and U.S. Mail boys. Includes several images of African Americans in western N.C. Collection also includes 4 photographs produced by Brown alone and 3 stereoscopic views produced by Nat W. Taylor.

Collection contains photographs (chiefly cabinet cards produced by Lindsey and Brown) of street scenes, landscapes, and tourist attractions in late 19th-century western N.C. Descriptive text is printed on the reverse side of many of the photographs. Most photographs were taken in the vicinity of the Swannanoa, Hot Springs, the French Broad River, Round Knob, Hickory Nut Gap, Buck Forest, Highlands, and Asheville. Contains photographs of the Battery Park Hotel, Chimney Rock, Hooker's Mill, McElroy Tunnel, Devil's Pulpit, Paint Rock, the Seven Sisters, the Swannanoa tunnel stockade, the Murphy Division, Devil's Slip Gap, the Western North Carolina Railroad and U.S. Mail boys. Includes several images of African Americans in western N.C. Collection also includes 4 photographs produced by Brown alone and 3 stereoscopic views produced by Nat W. Taylor. The photographs are sorted by class and the photograph number is given, if known.

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Nate Larson photographs, 2015 1 Linear Foot — 2 boxes; 63 items; 13 x 19 inches

Collection comprises a set of 48 color photographs, 13 reproductions of historic postcards, and several introductory panels, from a project by photographer and artist Nate Larson entitled "Map of All the Railroads," inspired by H.V. Poor's "Map of All the Railroads in the United States in Operation and Progress" (1854). The 13x19 inch digital color photographs, taken in 2015, explore social and economic aspects of thirteen railroad-centered cities and towns identified in Poor's publication, and their progress and potential future. Images feature cityscapes, railroad tracks, buildings and businesses, abandoned sites, monuments, several portraits of people, and other subjects. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises set of 48 color photographs, 13 reproductions of historic postcards, and several introductory panels, part of a project by photographer and artist Nate Larson entitled "Map of All the Railroads," inspired by H.V. Poor's "Map of all the Railroads in the United States in Operation and Progress" (1854). The 13x19 inch digital color photographs, taken in 2015, explore social and economic aspects of thirteen railroad-centered North Carolina cities and towns identified in Poor's book, and their progress and potential future.

The cities are: Charlotte, Concord, Gaston, Goldsboro, Greensboro, Halifax, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Salisbury, Warrenton, Wayne, Whiteville, and Wilmington. Images include views of businesses, cemeteries, railroad tracks and crossings, monuments, construction sites, abandoned buildings, and several portraits of people.

The artist's statement reads: "In November 2105, I visited twelve of these cities and the site of one former city to survey their progress and contemplate their future. These photographs are observations of the man-altered American landscape and seek to understand of the human experience within it. The images function as a meditation on the passage of time, shifting dynamics of progress and development, and the peculiarities of historic events that shape the present."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Peter Goin photographs, 1987-2006 and undated 8.0 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — Approximately 1451 items

Collection consists of photographs by Peter Goin on the theme of the interactions and the connections between people and the natural world, and the way people manage, perceive, and represent "nature." The images depict altered and artificial landscapes featuring beaches, canals, farm fields, rivers, prescribed burns and reforestation sites, zoos, an abandoned town, and other places. They were shot in various locations, predominantly in North and South Carolina and Virginia, but also in Alabama, Georgia, central Florida, Arizona, California, Tennessee, and Nevada. The project resulted in a book, Humanature (1996) and an exhibit. Image formats include 16x20 inch exhibit-quality color prints, accompanied by negatives, black-and-white work prints, and book illustration prints. Research, correspondence, and other publication materials are also included in the collection. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts, Duke University.

Collection chiefly consists of photographs by Peter Goin on the theme of the interactions and the connections between people and the natural world, and the way people manage, perceive, and represent "nature." The exhibit-quality color prints (16x20 inches) and black-and-white work prints (chiefly 8x10) feature images taken Goin from 1991-1992 while he was Artist-In-Residence at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. They depict altered and artificial landscapes such as beaches, canals, farm fields, rivers and dams, managed forests, a scale model of a river, zoos, an abandoned town (Ellenton, S.C.), and other places. In these settings, people can be seen replanting trees, building ditches, hunting, or simply surveying their surroundings. Other formats include negatives, two slides, and book illustration prints. The collection also includes research, correspondence, publicity, and other materials deriving from the book Humanature.

The images were shot in various locations, predominantly in North and South Carolina and Virginia, but also in Alabama, Georgia, central Florida, Arizona, California, and Tennessee. Locations in North Carolina include Durham, the NC Zoological Park, Duke Forest, the Carnivore Preservation Trust, Outer Banks beaches, the Chatooga and Nantahala Rivers, and the Appalachian mountains near Highlands. There is also one image from Nevada. A selection was published in Goin's book, Humanature, published by University of Texas Press in 1996, and the project also generated a traveling exhibit of the same name.

A group of copy prints included in the collection were used illustrate Goin's book. These are historic images from the 1930s through the 1980s, many taken to document the work of state-run programs. As with Goin’s own work, they also show human-altered landscapes such as reforestation sites, canals, beach erosion replanting sites, and others. A few images appear to be from the 1950s and are of schoolchildren in Aiken, South Carolina. Other locations include Durham, N.C.’s Duke Forest, the Colorado River, beaches, and western deserts.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts, Duke University.

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Documentary photographer and writer based in western North Carolina. Collection contains 16 gelatin silver prints from Amberg's Sodom Laurel Album book that the Center for Documentary Studies turned into a traveling exhibit. Also includes 32 prints displayed in the Allen Building exhibition. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

Collection consists of 2 series, each holding prints from Amberg's Sodom Laurel Album, first published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2002. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

The 16 gelatin silver prints in the Traveling Exhibit series were used in a 2003 traveling exhibit created by the Center for Documentary Studies. The series includes images of Dellie Norton and her family, tobacco planters and workers, and scenes from Madison County, North Carolina.

The 32 Allen Building Exhibit prints were used in an exhibition at Duke University's Allen Building. They include both 11x14 and 16x20 gelatin silver prints. Scenes include Dellie Norton and her family, tobacco workers, cemeteries, and folk arts.

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Will Grossman photographs of Durham, North Carolina, 1969-1979, 2006 6 Linear Feet — 8 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 585 items — 585 Items

Will Grossman was a 20th century documentary photographer based in Durham, North Carolina. The 80 black-and-white images in the collection chiefly document Durham County and the city of Durham in the 1970s. There are also 488 negatives, as well as a set of 16 inkjet exhibition prints and an exhibit poster from 2006. Grossman's subjects include barns and rural landscapes; houses and churches; tobacco warehouses, a cigarette factory, and other industrial buildings; tobacco workers and other portraits of individuals, including many African Americans; scenes along the Eno River; and the Durham County Fair. A few images are from Orange County, N.C. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The 80 black-and-white images in the collection chiefly document Durham County and the city of Durham in the 1970s. There are also 488 negatives, as well as a set of 16 inkjet exhibition prints and an exhibit poster from 2006. Grossman's subjects include barns and rural landscapes; houses and churches; tobacco warehouses, a cigarette factory, and other industrial buildings; tobacco workers and other portraits of individuals, including many African Americans; scenes along the Eno River; and the Durham County Fair. A few images are from Orange County, N.C. Included in the collection is one of Grossman's most important photographs, "Sunbeam," which features three men sitting in a shaft of sunlight near a warehouse door. Prints are arranged in image number order supplied by library staff.

The 80 gelatin silver prints range in size from 4x6 to 10 3/4 x 13 3/4 inches, and are organized in the following topical series: Buildings; Durham, N.C.; Durham County Fair; Eno River; Landscapes and the Natural World; and Portraits. These series titles were supplied by library staff, with a few exceptions. There is also an exhibit prints series housing 16 digitally printed inkjet photographs that range from 8x8 to 16 x 24 3/4 inches. The sizes of the mats range from 11x14 to 24x32 inches.

Some prints bear original captions; captions supplied by library staff are in brackets. Print numbers were supplied by library staff. Among the negatives in the collection are images that represent the photographic prints in the collection, but there are also many negatives for which prints do not exist, including images of locations in Durham city and county.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Youth Document Durham and Durham Works were programs sponsored by Duke University and the Center for Documentary Studies that brought together young people ages 12–16 from diverse Durham communities to document their lives, local history, and contemporary social issues through photography, oral history, and narrative writing. The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works project records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the history and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Many of the students are African American or Hispanic and their topics often highlight social conditions and race relations in African American and Hispanic communities in Durham neighborhoods and in a few other locations, including South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of oral interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, documented through audiocassette recordings, photographs, writings, and some transcripts, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for the program from its beginnings through 2008. There is also a database created by Center for Documentary Studies staff that records the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews. This data also contains restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works program records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the histories and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Although the vast majority of the projects focus on Durham, there is also one project based in South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The collection is divided into four series: Interviews, Photographic Material, Project Files, and Additions.

The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for those years. The contents of each series is described in full below. There is also a Community Stories database that houses the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews, and restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist.

The Interviews Series forms the bulk of the collection, and houses the materials generated by the student projects. Each session was organized around a topic which usually would be repeated in subsequent years, such as "Durham Works" or "Old Five Points." Folders usually house one set of interviews conducted by one or more students, and contents typically consist of one or more cassette tapes of the oral interviews, consent forms and other documentation about the interviewees, and writings by the students that came out of their experiences as interviewers. Some interviews have been transcribed. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; viewing or listening copies need to be made before contents can be accessed. Folders are arranged in number order as assigned by Center for Documentary Studies Staff; they are not in chronological order. An alternate listing at the end of this collection inventory groups boxes by project title rather than folder number order.

In addition to oral histories and writings, the students also produced many images of their subjects and their communities. Photographic prints and negatives of their work are housed in the Photographic Materials Series. Students also produced poems and drawings, and these are chiefly found in the Project Files Series.

Supporting program materials - curriculum guides, notes on staff meetings, staff guidelines, assessments of outcomes - are found in the Project Files Series. Also housed here are additional photographic images, mostly of the project students and staff, CDs with final projects, and the many publications that came out of the Center for Documentary Studies program. These booklets contain mostly interview transcriptions but also include photographs, drawings, annotations, and poetry. Also included is a retrospective collection of Youth Document Durham participant photos and essays, edited by Hong-An Truong and published in 2005.

Later accessions to the collections are found in the Additions Series. These items consist of audiovisual materials, photographs, and some printed materials. In addition to the Youth Document Durham project, related projects included in the Additions series are the Youth Treatment Court, which seems to have been a division of Youth Document Durham, and the Connect Program, which included projects from Old Five Points as well as special group projects for youth.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.