Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Place North Carolina -- Social conditions Remove constraint Place: North Carolina -- Social conditions

Search Results

collection icon
North Carolina educator and superintendent of public schools in Greensboro, N.C. The papers of Benjamin Lee Smith, North Carolina educator and Duke University alumnus, span the years 1916-1961, and contain correspondence, memoranda, clippings, and other printed material related to public education at both the local and state levels in North Carolina. There are also several dozen photographs of N.C. school buildings and personnel, circa 1930s-1950s. Papers are arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Subject Files (the largest series in the collection), Clippings, Printed Material, and Speeches. Other topics include prohibition and the elections of 1928, and religion and politics in North Carolina. A small but significant amount of material concerns school integration in Greensboro and associated civil rights issues in North Carolina (located within boxes 10, 11, 14-16, 21, 24, 26 and 31). Collection also includes material on charitable organizations in which Smith was active, especially the Methodist Church, North Carolina Education Association (NCEA), Kiwanis Club, Boy Scouts, and the Horace Mann League.

The papers of Benjamin Lee Smith, North Carolina educator and Duke University alumnus, span the years 1916-1961, and contain correspondence, memoranda, clippings, and other printed material related to public education at both the local and state levels in North Carolina. There are also several dozen photographs of N.C. school buildings and personnel, circa 1930s-1950s. Papers are arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Subject Files (the largest series in the collection), Clippings, Printed Material, and Speeches. Other topics include prohibition and the elections of 1928, and religion and politics in North Carolina. A small but significant amount of material concerns school integration in Greensboro and associated civil rights issues in North Carolina (located within boxes 10, 11, 14-16, 21, 24, 26 and 31). Collection also includes material on charitable organizations in which Smith was active, especially the Methodist Church, North Carolina Education Association (NCEA), Kiwanis Club, Boy Scouts, and the Horace Mann League.

collection icon
The Neighborhoods Project was created as part of the Community Programs department within Duke's Center for Documentary Studies. According to the CDS website, it offered North Carolina elementary school teachers an innovative and effective way to meet social studies goals outlined in the state's standard course of study. The project provided a way to engage students in their own communities, focusing on their individual lives and stories through photographs, narrative writing, and storytelling. It provided a series of experiential learning activities that encouraged the use of photography, oral history, and narrative writing in an exploration of community and citizenship. Collection includes black-and-white photographs, negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes where whites, African Americans, and Spanish-seeking citizens live. Some materials are in Spanish. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

Collection includes black-and-white photographs (a few are hand-colored), negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Materials are sorted by school, with miscellaneous or unidentified materials in the last series. Also contains electronic and audiovisual recordings that require reformatting before use.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon
The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The collection houses work created by students enrolled in documentary studies courses at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. The student projects focus primarily on exploring and documenting the social lives and experiences of people living in and around rural and urban areas of Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina, through photography or oral history. Subjects include but are not limited to local school environments; churches and religious life; ethnic communities and neighborhoods; war veterans; the 9/11 attacks; the labor and civil rights movements as experienced by local individuals; students at Duke University; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; beauty pageants; local music scenes; and the built environment and culture of North Carolina towns, and cities. Audiovisual materials include sound recordings and moving images, and may require reformatting before contents can be accessed. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection houses photographs, interviews, essays, and other documentary works created by students enrolled in courses or thesis projects on documentary studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), from 1980 to 2011. Most of the student projects focus on the social life and customs of persons living in and around Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina. Themes include life in cities and towns, particularly in Durham; rural life; schools and other institutions such as churches and retirement homes, and charitable organizations such as soup kitchens and orphanages; community centers such as stores, daycares, and laundromats; African American communities and neighborhoods, particularly in Durham; beauty pageants; local music; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; midwives; the 9/11 attacks in New York City; and Duke University students and campus life. One series of images portrays the Chuck Davis African American Dance Ensemble in Durham. Oral histories of N.C. civil rights and labor activists, American war veterans, and other individuals are associated with certain courses.

The majority of projects focus on Durham area locales, but other cities and towns in N.C. documented include Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Seagrove, Wanchese, Cane Creek, Oxford, Carrboro, Orange Factory, Rougemont, Saxapahaw, Salisbury, Northside, Corinth, and Cedar Grove. There are a few projects based in Virginia, and summer projects located in Massachusetts, Tennessee, Tel-Aviv, and France.

The collection also includes a few grant-supported projects by professional documentarians Eric Green, Kate Rhodenbaugh, Carolina Wang, and Donna Lennard, and photographic work by Bill Bamberger, a faculty member at Duke.

Black-and-white prints make up the majority of formats, but there are also many slides. The more recent additions increasingly include oral histories on audio cassettes and CD-ROMS and other project-related digital media. These are marked in the folder descriptions. Original audiovisual and electronic media are closed to use and may require the production of use copies before they can be accessed.

The courses were all sponsored by the Center for Documentary Photography, which in 1989 changed its name to the Center for Documentary Studies. Among the faculty teaching courses for the Center for Documentary Studies are noted documentarians Bill Bamberger, John Biewen, David Cecelski, Alex Harris, and Margaret Sartor, some of whom have contributed their own documentary work to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon
online icon
Black educator, journalist, and reformer from Raleigh, North Carolina. Correspondence, scrapbooks of clippings, print material such as articles and reports, and other papers, all dating from the Civil War into the first few decades of the 20th century. Includes a fourth edition of Lunsford Lane's slave narrative. The material discusses and illuminates the problems experienced by emancipated blacks during Reconstruction and into the early 20th century, encompassing agriculture, business, race relations, reconstruction, education, politics, voting rights, and economic improvement for African Americans. Other topics include Durham and Raleigh, N.C. history; the temperance movement, Hunter's personal matters and family finances, the North Carolina Industrial Association, and the N.C. Negro State Fair. Significant correspondents include Charles B. Aycock, Thomas W. Bickett, William E. Borah, Craig Locke, Josephus Daniels, W.E.B. Du Bois, Charles G. Dawes, John A. Logan, Lee S. Overman, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, Charles Sumner, Zebulon B. Vance, and Booker T. Washington. There is also correpondence from two early African American Congressmen, Henry P. Cheatham and George H. White. Also included is a draft of a speech given by Frederick Douglass in 1880 at the 2nd Negro State Fair.

The Charles N. Hunter Papers date from the 1850s to 1932 and consist of Hunter's personal and professional correspondence, scrapbooks of clippings, articles, reports, and memorabilia. Correspondence relates to personal and financial matters, as well as to Hunter's various activities to improve African American education and economic well-being, particularly in the South. Specific topics touched on throughout his papers include race relations, voting rights, creating an educational system for African Americans, the temperance movement, reconstruction, African American business and agriculture, the North Carolina Industrial Association, and the North Carolina Negro State Fair. The three correspondence subseries form almost half of the Personal and Professional Papers Series . The correspondence subseries are: Business/Community Incoming Correspondence, Personal Incoming Correspondence, and Outgoing Correspondence. Among the correspondents are several African American Congressional representatives such as George H. White and Henry P. Cheatham; major political figures like Franklin D. Roosevelt and John Alexander Logan; important African American scholars including W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington; and many North Carolina governors, in particular Zebulon B. Vance, Charles B. Aycock, Locke Craig, and Thomas Walter Bickett. Although these letters address professional and political issues, Hunter established friendships with many of the noteable correspondents. The incoming correspondence has been arranged into letters pertaining to Hunter's business or community activities and letters relating to Hunter's personal life. There are also numerous drafts and copies of outgoing correspondence that Hunter wrote.

In the Other Professional Papers Subseries, there is a variety of miscellaneous printed materials and papers that cover Hunter's career as a teacher and principal, involvement in the N.C. Industrial Association, and role in the N.C. Negro State Fair. Included in this subseries is an array of print materials that provide a view of African American life in the South. This includes commencement invitations from historically black colleges and universities, a fourth edition of Lunsford Lane's slave narrative, and newspaper clippings. The bulk of this subseries deals with the larger Raleigh area, though some items address national issues.

The Writings and Speeches Subseries includes addresses given by Hunter and others. Most noteable is a transcription of Frederick Douglass' speech given at the 2nd Annual N.C. Negro State Fair. Amongst Hunter's writings are several pieces intended for a local encyclopedia which detail historic locales and important North Carolina men. Writings cover topics such as African American voting rights and post-Reconstruction analysis. Overall, Hunter's writings provide historical sketches of important figures, events, and reprecussions with an emphasis on local history.

The Scrapbooks Series is made up of seventeen scrapbooks assembled by Hunter which contain clippings and other items concerning race relations and other social, political, and economic affairs pertaining to African Americans. They are composed principally of newspaper clippings published in North Carolina, but their scope is national as well as local. The clippings have been copied and arranged chronologically; the originals are closed to use.

collection icon

Chris Johnson farmworker photographs, 1990s 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes

Collection comprises 124 black-and-white digital photographic prints taken by North Carolina photographer Chris Johnson, portraying North Carolina farmworkers and migrant laborers in work settings as well as in their field camps and homes, many of which are revealed as dilapidated and unsanitary. Several series document labor organization and protests, including a five-year strike protesting working conditions for Mount Olive Pickle company workers. Other subjects in the images include the children and families of the farmworkers; volunteer teachers and organizers, some of whom are from the organization Student Action with Farmworkers; tobacco and Christmas tree growing in North Carolina; and street scenes from the border crossing areas of Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 124 black-and-white photographic prints taken by North Carolina photographer Chris Johnson, portraying North Carolina farmworkers and migrant laborers in work settings as well as in their field camps and homes, many of which are revealed as dilapidated and unsanitary. Several series document labor organization and protests, including a five-year strike protesting working conditions for Mount Olive Pickle company workers. Other subjects in the images include the children and families of the farmworkers; volunteer teachers and organizers, some of whom are from the organization Student Action with Farmworkers; tobacco and Christmas tree growing in North Carolina; and street scenes from the border crossing areas of Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico.

The prints measure 13x19 inches and are unmatted.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

Frank Clyde Brown papers, 1912-1974 70 Linear Feet — 98 manuscript boxes; 1 oversize box — approximately 54,000 items

online icon
English professor, Duke University, folklorist of Durham, N.C., and founder in 1913 of the North Carolina Folklore Society. Collection centers around Frank Clyde Brown's lifelong exploration and collecting of North Carolina and Appalachian folklore, which resulted in this vast archival collection of original folklore materials and editorial records for the seven-volume Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore (published 1952-1964). Collection is comprised of field recordings on wax cylinders and phonodiscs; tens of thousands of field notes, transcriptions of original songs, stories, and traditional expressions; musical scores; and numerous journal articles, student theses, books, and lists. Also included are the papers of Charles Bond, a Duke graduate student who studied and expanded the collection in 1970. The vast majority of the folklore sources originated in North Carolina, but there are some materials from other regions. Subjects include: African American traditions; ballads and songs (music as well as lyrics); European roots of North American folklore; folk music; folk poetry; games and parties; oral traditions and storytelling; sayings, names, and superstitions; social conditions in the Southern States; work songs; and North American folklore in general. In addition, one can find rich resources on the study and teaching of folklore, and attitudes during the 1920s to 1950s about Southern customs and communities.

Collection centers around folklorist Frank Clyde Brown's papers related to his lifelong exploration and collecting of North Carolina and Appalachian folklore, which resulted in this vast archival collection of original folklore materials and editorial records for the project which published Brown's work in seven volumes as (The Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore, 1952-1964. Materials comprise about 1,049 tunes and songs recorded on wax cylinders and lacquer and aluminum phonodiscs, backup copies of the recordings on glass lacquer phonodiscs made by the Library of Congress in the 1940s, 30,000 written notes on lore, 650 musical scores, and numerous journal articles, student theses, books, lists, and other items. The folklore sources originated in at least 84 North Carolina counties, with about 5 percent from 20 other states and Canada, and came from the efforts of 650 other contributors besides Brown himself. Also included are the research notes and other papers of Charles Bond, a Duke graduate student who dealt with the collection in 1970.

Subjects range widely and include: ballads and songs (music as well as lyrics); European roots of North American folklore; folk music; folk poetry; games and parties; oral traditions and storytelling; superstitions; social conditions in the Southern States; African American traditions; work songs; and North American folklore in general. In addition, one can find rich resources on the study and teaching of folklore, and attitudes during the 1920s to 1950s about Southern customs and communities.

The collection is divided into the following series: Cylinders and Discs, which includes the Library of Congress glass lacquer phonodisc copies, Personal Papers, General Editors' Papers, Associate Editors' Papers, Charles Bond Research Material.

The Recordings Series includes 1,049 performances on original wax cylinders and phonodiscs, re-recordings of the cylinders and discs created by the Library of Congress in the 1940s, and supplementary materials. The original wax cylinders and phonodiscs were digitized and described as part of a CLIR/Mellon grant in 2015-2018.

The Personal Papers series includes Brown's correspondence, research files, and the extensive materials in the folklore collection, which include transcriptions and sheet music. All items were gathered by Brown, and taken over in 1943 by Dr. Newman Ivey White, who served as first general editor of the project from its inception then until his death in 1948. The General Editors' Papers include items which were related to and produced by the work of White, and Paull Franklin Baum who assumed duties at White's death, and saw the project through to its completion in 1964. The Associate Editors' Papers have been organized by editor, and include drafts and typescripts for various volumes.

The Charles Bond Research Material Series stems from the work of Charles Bond, a student of Professor Holger O. Nygard at Duke University. Bond opened the archival collection in 1970-1971, and prepared both an outline as well as a Tabulation of Unpublished Items in the collection. This series also includes correspondence, an index, and card files.

collection icon
online icon
Born in Caroleen, North Carolina in 1902, studio photographer Herbert Lee Waters supplemented his income from 1936 to 1942 by traveling across North Carolina and parts of Virginia, Tennessee, and South Carolina to film the people of small communities. He collaborated with local movie theaters to screen his films, which he called Movies of Local People. As a filmmaker, Waters produced 252 films across 118 communities. The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and primarily comprises 16 mm black and white reversal original motion picture films created by Waters during the filming of the Movies of Local People series. The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, also includes various preservation elements created from the original footage: 16 mm internegatives; 16 mm screening prints; 3/4 inch Umatic, Betacam SP, and Digital Betacam preservation tape masters; and VHS and DVD use copies of Waters' works. The collection contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters' film making, including: a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters to record financial and business information during the filming of Movies of Local People; photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; copy of a 2005 master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters.

The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and comprises primarily 16 mm black and white reversal original motion picture films created by Waters between 1936 and 1942 as he traveled across North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia filming the residents of small towns. Waters aimed to film as many residents in each community as possible, often setting up his camera at the main intersection in town to capture community members walking downtown. Waters also typically filmed school children entering or leaving school and workers arriving to or departing from mills, plants, and factories. Waters often included trick shots to engage his audience, such as trains moving backwards or children jumping in reverse. Although the films are dominated by shots of crowds and individual faces, Waters also captured a wide variety of activities, like school recitals, sports, mechanics at work, and manufacturing processes in factories.

The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, includes various preservation elements created from the original footage: 16 mm internegatives; 16 mm screening prints; 3/4 inch Umatic, Betacam SP, and Digital Betacam preservation tape masters; and VHS and DVD use copies of Waters' works. The majority of films represented in the collection are silent, black and white, and were filmed in North Carolina. The collection includes a small number of color films and one film with sound. Reels containing mixed black and white and color footage were separated into two reels based on picture characteristic during the preservation process.

The collection also contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters, including: photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; VHS copies of a news report and a film on Waters; a copy of the master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student Martin Johnson in 2005; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters. In addition, the collection contains a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters between the years of 1936 and 1942 to document his earnings from the Movies of Local People films. The logs provide information about film screenings in the towns that he visited, including the dates of the screenings, the theaters where the films played, admission prices, the number of tickets sold, and advertising revenues. See the digital collection to view the logbooks.

collection icon

John Moses photographs, 1974-1993 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 33 items — 31 prints and 2 typed manuscripts

Collection of 23 photographs taken by John Moses, pediatrician and photographer, of teenaged parents and their children, chiefly in Durham, North Carolina and surrounding communities, and eight photographs of farmworkers taken in the South. Seeking to find the "human stories behind the statistics," he photographed the adolescent parents - almost all young women - in their homes and urban surroundings. A few images include grandparents. The photographs of farm laborers were taken in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida from 1974-1979, and include portraits of children, adults, and older people of all races at work and at home; also includes one of farmworkers protesting on a road as a bus with a Minute Maid sign rolls by. The gelatin silver prints all measure 11x14 inches. Includes an index of image titles and a three-page statement by Moses about his photography and its relevance to his medical work. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 23 photographs taken by John Moses, North Carolina pediatrician and photographer, of teenaged parents and their children, chiefly in Durham, North Carolina and surrounding communities, and eight photographs of farmworkers taken in the South.

Seeking to find the "human stories behind the statistics," Moses photographed the adolescent parents - almost all young women - in their homes and urban surroundings. A few images include grandparents. The photographs of farm laborers were taken in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida from 1974-1979, and include portraits of children, adults, and older people of all races at work and at home; also includes one of farmworkers protesting on a road as a bus with a Minute Maid sign rolls by.

The gelatin silver prints all measure 11x14 inches. Includes an index of image titles and a three-page statement by Moses about his photography and its relevance to his medical work. The description mentions oral histories conducted by Moses; these audio materials are not currently part of the collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

Joseph Ingram Sr. papers, 1769-1935 and undated 2.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,130 Items

Joseph Ingram Sr. was a member of the Ingram family of Anson County, North Carolina. The collection contains family and business papers and correspondence of Joseph Ingram, Dr. E. N. Ingram, and various members of the Ingram family. The bulk of the collection belongs to the first half of the nineteenth century, and includes materials pertaining to the cotton industry, slavery, transportation, and social and economic conditions in Anson County, North Carolina.

The collection contains family and business papers and correspondence of Joseph Ingram, Dr. E. N. Ingram, and various members of the Ingram family. The bulk of the collection belongs to the first half of the nineteenth century, and includes materials referring to the cotton industry, slavery, transportation, and social and economic conditions in Anson County, North Carolina.

collection icon

Primarily office files, including commission and committee meeting minutes, reports, correspondence, financial records, printed material, and other items. The files document the council's attempts to marshal churches in N.C. to act on a variety of social concerns, including race relations, poverty, immigration, the death penalty, war and peace, and ecumenism. Special topics include the United Church Women, NCCC Social Ministries, and outreach to migrant and aging populations. The collection includes a scrapbook for the United Church Women, 460 black-and-white and 66 color photographs, 43 color slides, and 60 black-and-white and 142 color negatives. (59,739 items; 94.45 lf; 1935-2001 (bulk 1969-1994)(01-100, 01-135)

Addition (dated 1971-1975 and undated) contains materials related to the organization's ministry with the aging. There are brochures, fliers, publications, and manuals, many regarding how to establish a meals-on-wheels program. This accession is unprocessed.

The 2006 addition (2007-0133)(5,000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1966-1982) contains operational and subject files, including correspondence, executive board meeting files, minutes, reports from sub-committees, and files related to similar religious organizations.