Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Place North Carolina -- Social life and customs Remove constraint Place: North Carolina -- Social life and customs

Search Results

collection icon
Early female graduate of Duke University School of Medicine (M.D., 1946) and pediatrician in private practice in Durham Co., N.C., 1949-1987. The bulk of the papers of Bailey Daniel Webb consist of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Bailey Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, chiefly in community medicine and governance, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore. Records containing personally-identifiable medical information, chiefly pediatric case histories, have been segregated and are closed to use.

The bulk of the collection consists of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore.

Papers also include memoirs, largely in verse and written by Webb's grandmother, about slaves on her father's plantation; and an album of sayings related to "Poplar Forest," a home built by Thomas Jefferson, where a relative lived in 1970. The album's cover has an early photograph of the house pasted on. There is also a small amount of information on the histories of Wilson and Wright high schools in North Carolina and a few church histories as well.

Other folders making up approximately a quarter of the collection contain Bailey Webb's professional correspondence and papers relating to her career as a pediatrician and medical community leader in various towns and cities of North Carolina. Correspondents include members of the Trent and Semans families. Includes Webb's diplomas, typewritten memoirs of her career, begining with her medical school training at Duke in the 1940s. A few of these volumes contain patient information and photos - these are currently closed to use.

collection icon
Betsy Gamble Hansen was an author and Duke University alumna. In 2000, she founded the Oglethorpe University Women's Network, and she belonged to Duke University's Council on Women's Studies for three years. The Betsy Gamble Hansen Papers include drafts of and papers related to Gamble's writings, especially related to her book, Portals, Menzies family correspondence, clippings, and other papers. Materials range in date from 1902 to 2003, with the bulk being from 1902-1960 and 1996-2003.

The Betsy Gamble Hansen papers are organized into two series. The Writings series includes drafts of Hansen's 2003 novel Portals, iterations of which existed under the titles A Communion of Saints, A Gathering of Saints and Sinners, The Hawk and the Myna Bird, and Tapestry Tales. Also included in this series are papers related to the publication of the book, including publishing contracts, typeface samples, prospectuses, copyright forms, and estimates. The Menzies Family correspondence and other papers series contains letters received by Hansen's grandmother, E.B. Menzies, of Hickory, North Carolina, and her immediate family, clippings, and other papers. The bulk of the correspondence in this series was written by Menzies's sons, Bruce, George, and Tom Menzies, and her daughters Mary Stuart Menzies Tarrant and Jane Menzies Gamble (Betsy Gamble Hansen's mother). Other frequent correspondents include Tom's wife, Frances Menzies, and George's wife, Betty Menzies. Also included are birthday cards, Christmas cards, and letters for E.B. Menzies from friends. Two folders labeled "Family Correspondence" consist of correspondence between E.B. Menzies's children and their spouses. Peppered throughout these folders are letters from E.B. Menzie's grandchildren, including Betsy Gamble Hansen.

Mrs. E. B. Menzies was born Reesie Tipton Warren in 1880 in Emory, Virignia and died in 1961. She lived most of her life in Hickory, NC. She married Edward Bruce Menzies in 1902, and they remained together until Edward died in 1924. Most of the pre-1930 correspondence in the collection consists of letters from E.B. Menzies's extended family and a few letters from her children while away at camp. The children wrote infrequently in the 1930s. During this time Tom, George, and Bruce traveled across the country from their hometown of Hickory, North Carolina, in search of work, while Jane and Mary Stuart remained at home. From 1932-1935, the three men each attended the Colorado School of Mines and performed construction work for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) project to build the Hoover Dam, then held temporary jobs in several different cities before settling in California. Tom and Bruce attended college while George appears to have continued working.

During World War II, each of E.B. Menzies's sons enlisted as United States Navy Seabees in the Pacific Theater, and began to write home much more frequently. Tom graduated in 1942 and was immediately subject to the draft, while Bruce and George began service several months later. None of the three men appear to have seen much conflict, and each survived the war unharmed, although Bruce did stay in a Navy Hospital for some time, apparently due to a stomach illness. Jane and Mary Stuart kept in frequent contact with their brothers throughout the war. All three men were discharged by 1945.

In the late 1940s and 1950s, each of E.B. Menzies's sons settled in California with their wives and children. George began working for a rail line, Tom took a job at a mill, and Bruce sold insurance. E.B. Menzies moved to California to teach for two years before moving back to North Carolina. Each of her children kept in regular correspondence with her throughout the 1950s, but the letters stop in 1961, when E.B. Menzies died.

In addition to the correspondence in this series, this series contains clippings and other papers compiled by E.B. Menzies, including a small amount of financial papers, prescriptions, and materials relating to her children.

collection icon
Collection consists of computer files comprising oral histories conducted by students with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transexual, or Queer (LGBTQ) Duke alumni. The oral histories document the inviduduals' experiences as members of the LGBTQ community before, during, and after their time at Duke. The alumni attended Duke between the mid-1970s and 2000s and describe experiences at and around Duke and Durham, North Carolina from a variety of perspectives and time periods. The oral histories were collected as part of the Spring 2015 class LGBTQ History and Activism: Duke, Durham, and Beyond. Computer files include audio files (WAV and MP3), field notes and tape logs (DOC and DOCX), and the occasional supporting document file.

Collection consists of computer files comprising oral histories conducted by students with LGBTQ Duke alumni in 2015 and 2016. The oral histories document the inviduduals' experiences as members of the LGBTQ community before, during, and after their time at Duke. The alumni attended Duke between the mid-1970s and 2000s and describe experiences at and around Duke and Durham, North Carolina from a variety of perspectives and time periods.

Some interviews also compare the LGBTQ experience at Duke and in Durham to other locations around the country over different time periods.

collection icon

Dula Family papers, 1894-1946 2 Linear Feet — 380 Items

Lenoir, N.C. residents. Collection consists primarily of letters from Alfred Weimer Dula to his wife Adelaide (Mast) Dula and letters from Harry Stuart Hickman to his wife Elizabeth (Dula) Hickman. Many of the letters deal with experiences during WWII. Alfred Dula was one of the first optometrists in N.C. and wrote to his wife while travelling to small towns. Harry Hickman wrote from Aviation Medical School, San Antonio, Tex. There are other miscellaneous letters to and from various family members, some from abroad. There is one travel diary of a trip from Montreal to points in Europe.

Collection consists primarily of letters from Alfred Weimer Dula to his wife Adelaide (Mast) Dula and letters from Harry Stuart Hickman to his wife Elizabeth (Dula) Hickman. Both families were residents of Lenoir, N.C. and members of the Dula family that were related to Tom Dula. Many of the letters deal with experiences during World War II. Alfred Dula was one of the first optometrists in N.C. and wrote to his wife while travelling to small towns. Harry Hickman wrote from Aviation Medical School, San Antonio, Texas. There are other miscellaneous letters to and from various family members, some from abroad. There is one 20th c. travel diary of a trip from Montreal to points in Europe.

collection icon

Eliza Wright Murphy papers, 1847-1927 1.2 Linear Feet — 950 Items

Teacher, from Atkinson, N.C. The papers of Eliza Wright Murphy consist of correspondence, poems, school essays, receipts, printed material, reports, and photographs. Most of these items are the personal papers of Eliza and her brothers: Edwin Edgar Murphy (1874-1914), John Gerald Murphy (b. 1872), Paul Percy Murphy (b. 1878), Isaac Wright Murphy, and C.C. Murphy, referred to as "Neil." Also includes material concerning the Arran-on-Black River Literary and Historical Society in Wilmington, N.C., including programs, minutes, memos, and reports, and the Presbyterian Mission Hospital in Kiangyin, China. The correspondence consists of several hundred letters to Eliza and her brothers from friends and relatives in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida. News about local events and the correspondent's personal life are the chief subjects discussed. Correspondents outside of the immediate family included members of the Vidal and Wright families.

The papers of Eliza Wright Murphy span the years 1873 to 1927 and consist of correspondence, poems, school essays, receipts, printed material, reports, and photographs. Most of these items are the personal papers of Eliza and her brothers; about 30 items, however, concern the Arran-on-Black River Literary and Historical Society or the Presbyterian Church. The correspondence forms the bulk of the collection.

The correspondence consists of several hundred letters to Eliza (circa 60%), and, from the 1890s to 1927, to her brothers (circa 40%), from friends and relatives living in North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, and elsewhere; very few of the letters are addressed to Eliza's parents. News about local events and the correspondent's personal life are the chief subjects discussed. Correspondents outside of the immediate family include Eliza's uncle J.C. Wright and other relatives in Coharie, N.C.; John W. Vidal, Adolphe L. Vidal and other cousins in Gainesville, Fla.; and Elizabeth Janet Black, or "Bessie," also a cousin, who lived in Raleigh, Lumber Bridge, and elsewhere in North Carolina before finally settling in Ivanhoe. Bessie's letters include a limited discussion of her teaching career, and, after 1919, her work for the Arran-on-Black River Literary and Historical Society as its secretary.

Eliza and her brothers also wrote frequently to each other. From 1898 to 1901, there are letters from John, Edwin, and Paul while they attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Isaac while he attended Oak Ridge Institute in Oak Ridge, N.C., and, to a lesser extent, from Neil while a student at Massey Business College in Richmond, Va. These letters concern student life at their respective schools, Isaac's volunteer work for the Y.M.C.A., and the usual family matters such as inquiries as to one's health, church, and social activities. Although Eliza's brothers pursued several different careers, very few of their letters discuss their professional and business activities; instead, the focus of their letters is on family news and social activities.

The Writings series (14 items) consist of short poems and school essays (1 p.) written by Eliza during childhood and early adolescence. The Legal and Financial Papers (40 items) consist of receipts, and undated tax list for the Black River section of Pender Co., N.C., and an undated contract for the distillation of grain. The Miscellaneous Papers (25 items) include two grade reports, one each for Edwin Edgar Murphy and John G. Murphy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, concert programs, a mimeographed copy entitled "Constitution, By-Laws, and Minutes of an Educational Association in Cleveland County organized about 1860," and three photographs (circa 1890s) of five women, one of whom may be Eliza.

The first category (15 items) in the Tropical Series concerns the Arran-on-Black River Literary and Historical Society. Incorporated in 1919, its chief purpose was to collect and publish materials documenting the heritage of Scottish emigrants from the island of Arran, off the west coast of Scotland, who settled in the Black River section of Eastern North Carolina. Included are programs, minutes, memos, and reports dating from 1919 to 1923. Letters concerning this society are located in the correspondence from 1919 onward.

The second category (12 items) concerns the Presbyterian Church, especially its foreign missions. Included is a manual of the First Presbyterian Church of Wilmington, N.C. (1904); newsletters from the Foreign Missions Executive Committee (1908-1910); and a handwritten report (1913) on the hospital fund campaign, submitted by Eliza Murphy to the Wilmington Presbytery, for the mission in Kiangyin, China.

This collection best documents a young woman growing up in North Carolina during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as her relationships with her brothers and the relations among the brothers themselves, separate from her. Other aspects documented include student life in college, teaching, a family's support of the Presbyterian Church, missionary activities in China, and the Arran-on-Black River Literary and Historical Society.

collection icon

Frank Clyde Brown papers, 1912-1974 70 Linear Feet — 98 manuscript boxes; 1 oversize box — approximately 54,000 items

online icon
English professor, Duke University, folklorist of Durham, N.C., and founder in 1913 of the North Carolina Folklore Society. Collection centers around Frank Clyde Brown's lifelong exploration and collecting of North Carolina and Appalachian folklore, which resulted in this vast archival collection of original folklore materials and editorial records for the seven-volume Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore (published 1952-1964). Collection is comprised of field recordings on wax cylinders and phonodiscs; tens of thousands of field notes, transcriptions of original songs, stories, and traditional expressions; musical scores; and numerous journal articles, student theses, books, and lists. Also included are the papers of Charles Bond, a Duke graduate student who studied and expanded the collection in 1970. The vast majority of the folklore sources originated in North Carolina, but there are some materials from other regions. Subjects include: African American traditions; ballads and songs (music as well as lyrics); European roots of North American folklore; folk music; folk poetry; games and parties; oral traditions and storytelling; sayings, names, and superstitions; social conditions in the Southern States; work songs; and North American folklore in general. In addition, one can find rich resources on the study and teaching of folklore, and attitudes during the 1920s to 1950s about Southern customs and communities.

Collection centers around folklorist Frank Clyde Brown's papers related to his lifelong exploration and collecting of North Carolina and Appalachian folklore, which resulted in this vast archival collection of original folklore materials and editorial records for the project which published Brown's work in seven volumes as (The Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore, 1952-1964. Materials comprise about 1,049 tunes and songs recorded on wax cylinders and lacquer and aluminum phonodiscs, backup copies of the recordings on glass lacquer phonodiscs made by the Library of Congress in the 1940s, 30,000 written notes on lore, 650 musical scores, and numerous journal articles, student theses, books, lists, and other items. The folklore sources originated in at least 84 North Carolina counties, with about 5 percent from 20 other states and Canada, and came from the efforts of 650 other contributors besides Brown himself. Also included are the research notes and other papers of Charles Bond, a Duke graduate student who dealt with the collection in 1970.

Subjects range widely and include: ballads and songs (music as well as lyrics); European roots of North American folklore; folk music; folk poetry; games and parties; oral traditions and storytelling; superstitions; social conditions in the Southern States; African American traditions; work songs; and North American folklore in general. In addition, one can find rich resources on the study and teaching of folklore, and attitudes during the 1920s to 1950s about Southern customs and communities.

The collection is divided into the following series: Cylinders and Discs, which includes the Library of Congress glass lacquer phonodisc copies, Personal Papers, General Editors' Papers, Associate Editors' Papers, Charles Bond Research Material.

The Recordings Series includes 1,049 performances on original wax cylinders and phonodiscs, re-recordings of the cylinders and discs created by the Library of Congress in the 1940s, and supplementary materials. The original wax cylinders and phonodiscs were digitized and described as part of a CLIR/Mellon grant in 2015-2018.

The Personal Papers series includes Brown's correspondence, research files, and the extensive materials in the folklore collection, which include transcriptions and sheet music. All items were gathered by Brown, and taken over in 1943 by Dr. Newman Ivey White, who served as first general editor of the project from its inception then until his death in 1948. The General Editors' Papers include items which were related to and produced by the work of White, and Paull Franklin Baum who assumed duties at White's death, and saw the project through to its completion in 1964. The Associate Editors' Papers have been organized by editor, and include drafts and typescripts for various volumes.

The Charles Bond Research Material Series stems from the work of Charles Bond, a student of Professor Holger O. Nygard at Duke University. Bond opened the archival collection in 1970-1971, and prepared both an outline as well as a Tabulation of Unpublished Items in the collection. This series also includes correspondence, an index, and card files.

collection icon

Gregory family papers, 1762-1923 1.2 Linear Feet — 2 boxes, 416 items

Correspondence, diaries, and other papers of the Gregory family and the related Pomfret, Beasley, Davis, Smith families of King William County, Va. and later of Granville County, N.C. Correspondence of the 18th century is largely that of Sally Pomfret Beasley with friends (mostly suitors) and relatives prior to her marriage to Stephen Beasley in 1786. From 1786-1830 the correspondence is with relatives of the Smith and Beasley families who are living in North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Ohio. There is a gap in the papers from 1830-1859. After 1859, the papers are largely those of William H. (Buck) Gregory while at the University of Virginia (1859-60), in the Confederate Army (1864-65), and in the merchantile and publishing business in Oxford and Stovall, NC in the 1870's and 1880's. This correspondence contains information on tobacco culture, social life and customs, amusements, and education in North Carolina. In 1888 he married Mary J. Davis, and there is much correspondence of their courtship. Collection includes lists of students at Belmont Academy, 1859, in Granville County and at the Oxford Classical and Grammar School, 1859-60,as well as genealogical information on the Pomfret, Gregory, Smith and Alexander families. Also includes diaries for various years between 1873 and 1903.

The collection consists of papers, principally those of William H. (Buck) Gregory, Stovall, North Carolina, while at the University of Virginia, 1859-60, in the Confederate service, 1865-65, and in the mercantile and publishing businesses in Oxford during the 1870s and 1880s. In 1888 he married Mary J. Davis of "Abram's Plains", Granville County, a descendant of Col. Sam. Smith, and there is much of the correspondence that was carried on while they were courting. The collection contains some information on tobacco culture, social life and customs, amusements, education (There are lists of students at Belmont Academy, 1859, in Granville County and at the Oxford Classical and Grammar School, 1859-60.), and a considerable amount of genealogical data on the Davis, Pomfret, Gregory, Smith, Downey, Alexander, Webb, and Winston families.

The Civil War letters are centered around W. H. Gregory and his service to the Confederacy. He was sixteen at the beginning of the war and suffered a physical disability which kept him in reserve units. Letters concern the Granville Greys, Co. K of the 23rd N. C Troops, later the 1st Jr. Reserve (Co. B 70th Regt. Jr. Res.). Dr. T. R. Gregory is in a Yankee prison, and other Gregory relatives write war letters. C. W. Broadfcot, Hugh Lawson Clay, Theophilus Holmes, Joseph Jonathan Davis, Walter Clark, Allen R. Boyd, and Wm. G. Stanard are among the correspondents.

The bound volumes, include a 9 volume diary by William H. Gregory for the years 1873, 1888, 1889, 1891, 1895, 1895, 1898, 1902, and 1903. The contents of these volumes, however, are very meager. See the Samuel Smith Downey Papers to which about 62 items of early Smith-Downey family MSS. were transferred, 8-24-65, from the W. H. Gregory MSS.

collection icon
online icon
Born in Caroleen, North Carolina in 1902, studio photographer Herbert Lee Waters supplemented his income from 1936 to 1942 by traveling across North Carolina and parts of Virginia, Tennessee, and South Carolina to film the people of small communities. He collaborated with local movie theaters to screen his films, which he called Movies of Local People. As a filmmaker, Waters produced 252 films across 118 communities. The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and primarily comprises 16 mm black and white reversal original motion picture films created by Waters during the filming of the Movies of Local People series. The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, also includes various preservation elements created from the original footage: 16 mm internegatives; 16 mm screening prints; 3/4 inch Umatic, Betacam SP, and Digital Betacam preservation tape masters; and VHS and DVD use copies of Waters' works. The collection contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters' film making, including: a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters to record financial and business information during the filming of Movies of Local People; photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; copy of a 2005 master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters.

The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and comprises primarily 16 mm black and white reversal original motion picture films created by Waters between 1936 and 1942 as he traveled across North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia filming the residents of small towns. Waters aimed to film as many residents in each community as possible, often setting up his camera at the main intersection in town to capture community members walking downtown. Waters also typically filmed school children entering or leaving school and workers arriving to or departing from mills, plants, and factories. Waters often included trick shots to engage his audience, such as trains moving backwards or children jumping in reverse. Although the films are dominated by shots of crowds and individual faces, Waters also captured a wide variety of activities, like school recitals, sports, mechanics at work, and manufacturing processes in factories.

The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, includes various preservation elements created from the original footage: 16 mm internegatives; 16 mm screening prints; 3/4 inch Umatic, Betacam SP, and Digital Betacam preservation tape masters; and VHS and DVD use copies of Waters' works. The majority of films represented in the collection are silent, black and white, and were filmed in North Carolina. The collection includes a small number of color films and one film with sound. Reels containing mixed black and white and color footage were separated into two reels based on picture characteristic during the preservation process.

The collection also contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters, including: photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; VHS copies of a news report and a film on Waters; a copy of the master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student Martin Johnson in 2005; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters. In addition, the collection contains a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters between the years of 1936 and 1942 to document his earnings from the Movies of Local People films. The logs provide information about film screenings in the towns that he visited, including the dates of the screenings, the theaters where the films played, admission prices, the number of tickets sold, and advertising revenues. See the digital collection to view the logbooks.

collection icon

Hugh Mangum photographs, circa 1890-1922 10 Linear Feet — 38 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 1141 items

online icon
Hugh Mangum was a commercial portrait photographer from Durham, North Carolina. Collection contains 937 glass plate negatives and printed black-and-white photographs taken by Mangum from about 1890 to 1922 as he traveled a rail circuit through North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia and in photography studios he and partners established in Roanoke, Pulaski, and East Radford, Virginia. The images are chiefly individual and group portraits of residents in those areas - women, children, and men, either in a studio setting or outdoors. The majority are white men and women, but there are also many African Americans. Some people have been identified; Mangum and his wife are present in several images. There are several street scenes from Radford, as well as Warrenton (probably N.C.), and Christiansburg, Virginia. Of the photographic prints, there are 55 prints made from selected negatives, and 50 inkjet digital prints from a 2012 exhibit. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Hugh Mangum Photographs collection dates from approximately 1890 through 1922, and contains 937 glass plate negatives and a selection of black-and-white prints, of portraits and scenes taken by Hugh Mangum, a portrait photographer based in Durham, North Carolina. There is also a set of 25 exhibit prints and 25 smaller viewing prints from a 2012 Center for Documentary Studies exhibit curated by a Duke University student.

The images were taken as Mangum traveled a rail circuit through North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. He also likely took some of these images in the photography studios he and partners established in Roanoke, Pulaski, and East Radford, Virginia. Communities marked on a few of the plates include Warrenton (probably North Carolina rather than Virginia), and Christiansburg, Virginia. Localities known to have been visited by Mangum in N.C. include Winston-Salem, High Point, Raleigh, Reidsville, Lexington, Durham, and Greensboro; in Virginia, Martinsville, East Radford, and Pulaski. From an annotated trunk lid found in the collection it seems he also visited Texas but it is unknown if any of the images in the collection were taken there.

The images are chiefly individual and group portraits of local residents, although there are several town scenes with landmark buildings. There are women, children, and men, either in a studio setting or outdoors; the majority are white but there are many African Americans. There are buildings such as barns, schools, and houses often present in the group portraits, and in many cases there are dogs, chickens, cats, and horses. Sometimes the individual poses with a possession such as a bicycle or musical instrument. One image is of a train accident with a large group of bystanders. Often numbers are stamped or written on the plate. The library staff has assigned unique numbers to each image and plate. There are multiple images of Hugh Mangum and the Mangum and Carden families; see the glass plate negative notes below for more details. The last dated print in the collection is a mounted print of Mangum's body in an open casket, 1922.

Mangum photographs are distinctive for the level of comfort exhibited by his subjects in front of the camera. This ease in front of the camera is readily noted due to the large quantity of "penny picture camera" negatives in the collection that contain multiple images of numerous subjects. Often the first picture of a subject appears rather stiff and formal as in traditional nineteenth century photographs. In the second and subsequent pictures, the subject often visibly relaxes, assumes different poses, uses props, removes or adds a hat, and may smile broadly at the camera. This progressive transition in poses from formal to very informal is a hallmark of the Mangum collection. The collection may be of particular interest to researchers studying late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century fashion trends.

The glass plate negatives are closed to use, but researchers may use online digitized images which represent the entirety of the collection of negatives. In addition, the collection also makes available for research use original contact prints, contact sheets, one panoramic print, and print reproductions created for exhibition and other purposes.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon
Educator, insurance agent, and civic leader, of Durham, N.C. Family, business, and personal correspondence (chiefly after 1851) of Southgate and of his family. The material concerns Southgate’s insurance business, life in North Carolina, the establishment of Durham, N.C., and of Duke University; the Southgate family in the Civil War, Reconstruction in North Carolina, education and civil activities in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia, and schools in Durham; and the activities and genealogy of the Southgate family. Correspondents and persons mentioned include Mattie Logan Southgate Jones, Delia Haywood Wynne Southgate, James Haywood Southgate, and Myra Ann Muse Southgate.

Family, business, and personal correspondence (chiefly after 1851) of Southgate and of his family. The material concerns Southgate’s insurance business, life in North Carolina, the establishment of Durham, N.C., and of Duke University; the Southgate family in the Civil War, Reconstruction in North Carolina, education and civil activities in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia, and schools in Durham; and the activities and genealogy of the Southgate family. Correspondents and persons mentioned include Mattie Logan Southgate Jones, Delia Haywood Wynne Southgate, and Myra Ann Muse Southgate.