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Frank Espada photographs and papers, 1946-2010, bulk 1964-2000 56.2 Linear Feet — 76 boxes; 3 oversize folders — approximately 14,500 items

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Frank Espada was a political activist and documentary photographer of Puerto Rican extraction based in New York and California. His photographic archives comprise thousands of black-and-white photographs and negatives as well as supporting papers and recordings, chiefly dating from the mid-1960s through 2000. The materials relate to Espada's lifelong work documenting the Puerto Rican diaspora, civil and economic rights movements, indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco. The Puerto Rican Diaspora series includes over 150 oral history recordings. The Civil Rights series documents voter registration drives and school desegregation rallies in New York City, 1964-1970, as well as discriminatory housing and anti-poverty movements, primarily in California. The professional papers provide supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher, and include files related to research and writings, exhibits, teaching, and publicity. The earliest dated item is a 1946 essay by Espada, "What democracy means to me." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Frank Espada's photographic archives comprise thousands of photographic prints, contact sheets, and negatives, as well as professional papers, spanning the length of Frank Espada's career as a photographer and community activist from the mid-1950s through 2010. The materials document Espada's Puerto Rican diaspora around the world; indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, primarily in Guam, Tinian, and Saipan; drug abuse prevention programs and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco; and civil rights, education, and housing rights movements, primarily in New York City and San Francisco. Espada was not only an observant photographer, but was also deeply involved in all of his projects as an activist, social worker, and humanitarian.

A large series of professional papers provides supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher. The earliest dated item, an essay Espada wrote in 1946, "What democracy means to me," is found in this series, which also contains research files on documentary and research topics; preparation for his many photography projects and related exhibits; a few videocassettes; teaching syllabi and notes from his photography courses at U.C. Berkeley; awards and memorabilia; and publicity.

The largest body of materials, which numbers over 12,000 items and includes photographs as well as manuscripts and over 100 recorded oral interviews, derives from Espada's work with Puerto Rican communities in the U.S. and in Puerto Rico.

Another significant group of materials derives from Espada's activism on behalf of voter registration and school desegregation in New York City from 1962-1970, and later in California in support of anti-poverty, HIV/AIDS and drug abuse prevention and outreach, and housing rights.

Each of the photographic project series includes finished prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 24x30 inches; contact sheets and work prints; and negatives, which are housed in a separate series and are closed to use.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Justin Kimball photographs, 2007-2016 2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 80 prints — 13x19 inches — 13x19 inches — 80 prints

Collection comprises 80 color inkjet prints selected from photographer Justin Kimball's projects, "Elegy" and "Pieces of String." The images were taken between 2007 and 2016 in small towns in Massachusetts, New York State, and Pennsylvania, places whose cultural fabric and economic livelihood have been deeply affected by 20th century deindustrialization. The images in the "Elegy" series depict working class neighborhoods, abandoned buildings and industrial sites, and people gathered on streets and porches, leaning out of windows, and playing ball games. The images in "Pieces of String" are of the interiors of abandoned houses and other buildings, taken as the photographer accompanied his brother, an auctioneer, to these properties; all that is left, as revealed in the images, are the artifacts of the former residents' lives, and the decay of the building and the contents within. All prints measure 13x19 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 80 color inkjet prints selected from photographer Justin Kimball's projects, "Elegy" and "Pieces of String." The images were taken between 2007 and 2016 in small towns in Massachusetts, New York State, and Pennsylvania, places whose cultural fabric and economic livelihood have been deeply affected by 20th century deindustrialization.

The images in the "Elegy" series depict small town life - working class neighborhoods, streetscapes, abandoned buildings and industrial sites, and people gathered on streets and porches, leaning out of windows, and playing ball games. The images in "Pieces of String" were taken in abandoned houses and other buildings as the photographer accompanied his brother, an auctioneer, to these properties; all that is left, as revealed in the images, are the artifacts of the former residents' lives (including a box labeled "pieces of string too small to save"), and the decay of the building and the contents within.

All prints measure 13x19 inches. A printed inventory and full artist's statement and biography is included with each set of prints.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Michael Itkoff photographs, 2006-2008 1 Linear Foot — 3 boxes

The thirty 20x24 inch exhibition-quality color photographs in this collection form a body of work, entitled "Wrecked," that explores the world of American stock car racing and demolition derbies, as well as the drivers, mechanics, pit crews, and spectators who prepare for and take part in the events. The images were taken by photographer Michael Itkoff from 2006 to 2008 at speedways, fairgrounds, and garages in New York State, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The prints are accompanied by a video of a demolition derby, a demolition derby team t-shirt, and a safety vest. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The thirty 20x24 inch exhibition-quality color photographs in this collection form a body of work entitled "Wrecked," that explores the world of American stock car racing and demolition derbies, and the drivers, mechanics, pit crews, and spectators who prepare for and take part in the events. The images were taken by photographer Michael Itkoff from 2006 to 2008 at speedways, fairgrounds, and garages in New York State, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The prints are accompanied by a demolition derby team t-shirt and a safety vest. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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R.C. Maxwell Company records, 1891-2001 and undated 135 Linear Feet — 118,350 Items

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R.C. Maxwell Company of Trenton, N.J., was one of the earliest enduring outdoor advertising companies, founded in 1894 by Robert Chester Maxwell (1873-1955) and continued to operate primarily in the New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania area until the company was sold in 2000. The R.C. Maxwell Company Records span the years 1891-2001 and include photographs and negatives, videocassettes, ledgers and account books, scrapbooks, correspondence and legal papers relating to the company's operations in outdoor advertising. Photographs and negatives in several formats (film, glass negatives, polaroid prints) document billboard designs for a variety of advertisers as well as depicting billboard and electric sign structures and their location relative to the surrounding environment. Urban locations include Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J., Boardwalk, where a number of photographs also document the Miss America beauty pageant parade and other parades in which the R.C. Maxwell Company participated. A few photographs document billboard construction and erection; there are also photographs of the Maxwell family and of Maxwell company staff and employees. Scrapbooks contain images of billboards and wall paintings produced by the Maxwell company as well as by David L. Clark, a High Point, N.C. artist and sign painter who was R.C. Maxwell's guardian. Other scrapbooks document primarily Coca-Cola signs of the early 20th century, as well as World War I support efforts including the U.S. Food Administration (under the direction of Herbert Hoover), the U.S. Fuel Administration, and Liberty Bond campaigns. Companies represented in the collection include the Boardwalk Advertising Signs Co., C&B Electric Signs Co., Trenton Advertising Co., and Trenton Poster Advertising Co. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The R.C. Maxwell Company Records span the years 1891-2001 and include photographs and negatives, videocassettes, ledgers and account books, scrapbooks, correspondence and legal papers relating to the company's operations in outdoor advertising. Photographs and negatives in several formats (film, glass negatives, polaroid prints) document billboard designs for a variety of advertisers as well as depicting billboard and electric sign structures and their location relative to the surrounding environment. Urban locations include Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J., Boardwalk, where a number of photographs also document the Miss America beauty pageant parade and other parades in which the R.C. Maxwell Company participated. A few photographs document billboard construction and erection; there are also photographs of the Maxwell family and of Maxwell company staff and employees. Scrapbooks contain images of billboards and wall paintings produced by the Maxwell company as well as by David L. Clark, a High Point, N.C. artist and sign painter who was R.C. Maxwell's guardian. Other scrapbooks document primarily Coca-Cola signs of the early 20th century, as well as World War I support efforts including the U.S. Food Administration (under the direction of Herbert Hoover), the U.S. Fuel Administration, and Liberty Bond campaigns. Companies represented in the collection include the Boardwalk Advertising Signs Co., C&B Electric Signs Co., Trenton Advertising Co., and Trenton Poster Advertising Co.

Approximately 15,000 photographs, dating up to around 1952, have been described in the searchable ROAD Database (Resource of Outdoor Advertising Descriptions). The numbered and indexed black-and-white photographs and negatives (along with a limited number of glass negatives) include images of billboard and electric spectacular executions (illuminated billboards); road shots showing the approach views to billboard structures; images of Maxwell advertising structures; and images of urban and rural billboard displays in various states, primarily Pennsylvania and New Jersey, including a number of images of Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J. boardwalk. Because the majority of photographs show the billboards in their surroundings, the images provide a snapshot of the people and buildings near the billboard.